buckminsterfullerene


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Related to buckminsterfullerene: Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, Buckyballs

buck·min·ster·ful·ler·ene

 (bŭk′mĭn-stər-fo͝ol′ə-rēn′)
n.
An extremely stable, ball-shaped carbon molecule, C60, reminiscent of a geodesic dome, and believed to occur naturally in soot. It was the first fullerene to be discovered. Also called buckyball.

[After Richard Buckminster Fuller.]

buckminsterfullerene

(ˌbʌkmɪnstəˈfʊləˌriːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a form of carbon that contains molecules having 60 carbon atoms arranged at the vertices of a polyhedron with hexagonal and pentagonal faces. It is produced in carbon arcs and occurs naturally in small amounts in certain minerals
[C20: named after Buckminster Fuller]

buck•min•ster•ful•ler•ene

(ˌbʌk mɪn stərˈfʊl əˌrin)
n.
the form of fullerene having sixty carbon atoms.
[1985; see fullerene]

buck·min·ster·ful·ler·ene

(bŭk′mĭn-stər-fo͝ol′ə-rēn′)
An extremely stable, ball-shaped carbon molecule, C60, whose structure looks like a geodesic dome. It is believed to occur naturally in soot. Also called buckyball. See Note at carbon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buckminsterfullerene - a spheroidal fullerene; the first known example of a fullerene
fullerene - a form of carbon having a large molecule consisting of an empty cage of sixty or more carbon atoms
References in periodicals archive ?
esearchers asserted that Buckminsterfullerene works by reducing the oxidative stress that causes aging.
Besides pegging buckminsterfullerene as a potential health threat, the findings show how the molecule's electrons harness and shunt light-energy as [C.
patents for buckminsterfullerenes, the recently discovered third form of carbon, in key imaging applications, including inks, toner, developer and photoreceptors.
At Vanderbilt, Rosenthal and her colleagues are experimenting with blends of quantum dots and polymers to which they add carbon-60, or buckminsterfullerene, molecules--popularly known as buckyballs.
The Nobel prize was awarded in 1996 to their discoverers, who had formally named the molecule buckminsterfullerene for its resemblance to the geodesic domes of architect R.
Lockheed Martin is sponsoring the Year of the Nano, Rice's celebration of the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the buckminsterfullerene molecule -- the "buckyball" -- that enables nanotechnology.
The most famous member of the family is buckminsterfullerene, consisting of 60 carbon atoms arranged in the pattern of a soccer ball.
His Nobel Prize was based on his co-discovery of buckminsterfullerene, an unusual carbon molecule consisting of 60 carbon atoms arranged as a spheroid, in a pattern exactly matching the stitching on soccer balls.
The researchers dubbed the molecule buckminsterfullerene for its resemblance to the domes designed by architect R.