buckminsterfullerene


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Related to buckminsterfullerene: Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, Buckyballs

buck·min·ster·ful·ler·ene

 (bŭk′mĭn-stər-fo͝ol′ə-rēn′)
n.
An extremely stable, ball-shaped carbon molecule, C60, reminiscent of a geodesic dome, and believed to occur naturally in soot. It was the first fullerene to be discovered. Also called buckyball.

[After Richard Buckminster Fuller.]

buckminsterfullerene

(ˌbʌkmɪnstəˈfʊləˌriːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a form of carbon that contains molecules having 60 carbon atoms arranged at the vertices of a polyhedron with hexagonal and pentagonal faces. It is produced in carbon arcs and occurs naturally in small amounts in certain minerals
[C20: named after Buckminster Fuller]

buck•min•ster•ful•ler•ene

(ˌbʌk mɪn stərˈfʊl əˌrin)
n.
the form of fullerene having sixty carbon atoms.
[1985; see fullerene]

buck·min·ster·ful·ler·ene

(bŭk′mĭn-stər-fo͝ol′ə-rēn′)
An extremely stable, ball-shaped carbon molecule, C60, whose structure looks like a geodesic dome. It is believed to occur naturally in soot. Also called buckyball. See Note at carbon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buckminsterfullerene - a spheroidal fullerene; the first known example of a fullerene
fullerene - a form of carbon having a large molecule consisting of an empty cage of sixty or more carbon atoms
References in periodicals archive ?
Buckminsterfullerene has potential medical applications in the treatment of cancer and HIV, and also in the creation of body armour.
These carbon allotropes include lonsdaleite (Frondel and Marvin 1967), buckminsterfullerene (Kroto et al.
Harold Kroto, who shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of buckminsterfullerene (the molecules commonly known as buckyballs), is a chemist at Florida State University in Tallahassee.
has developed the capability to expose rodents to nanoscale spherical Buckminsterfullerene "buckyball" particles.
Buckminsterfullerene, or "Bucky balls") are nanomaterials that gained attention after the first preparation of [C.
The Buckminsterfullerene, or "buckyball," launched the field of carbon nanotechnology and won its co-discoverers the 1996 Nobel Prize in chemistry.
Each wheel was a molecule called buckminsterfullerene, which consists of 60 carbon atoms arranged in a pattern that looks like the surface of a soccer ball.
Buckminsterfullerene, or carbon-60, which was discovered in
In the 1980s and 1990s, researchers also began to synthesize and characterize nanostructures, such as buckminsterfullerene, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, and nanowires, with novel and useful properties.