bucktail

buck·tail

 (bŭk′tāl′)
n.
1. Hair from the tail of a deer, often dyed and used especially in artificial fishing flies.
2. An artificial fly made with bucktail.

bucktail

(ˈbʌkˌteɪl)
n
(Fishing) a fishing lure adorned with deer hair
References in periodicals archive ?
A live shad or bucktail jig tossed in the swift water below either dam can connect with a striper that makes largemouth bass look puny by comparison.
If you are fly-fishing - and you must on the Tweed - flies tied with red or hot orange bucktail will trigger off that aggression and induce takes whether it's frosty or not.
Cameron Bucktail Watershed Association, Sinnemahoning Creek, $14,485
Does the ban include bucktail jigs, weedless rubber-legged bass jigs, jig-and-pig-rigs, spinner-baits, crappie jigs, lead-wrapped flies, ice jigs, weighted hooks, lures like Silver Buddies that smallmouths love, Mann's tail spinners, bait walker and bottom bouncer trolling/drifting rigs?
The diamond jigging chapters are written according to types of fish, whereas the bucktail chapters are written according to types of habitat.
A contemporary source wrote in her diary, "Tish says, 'there is a Bucktail soldier [Derickson] here devoted to the President, drives with him, and when Mrs.
Bobby took the fish on her husband David's favourite spinning lure Dave's Delight ( a variant of a Flying Bucktail.
Tripp has also unearthed this diary entry by a Washington socialite, from November 16, 1862: "Tish says, 'there is a Bucktail soldier here devoted to the President, drives with him, and when Mrs.
Strata Spoon Variety Kit: ``The Variety spoon kit contains a combination of standard and bucktail spoons in different sizes (from 1/4 ounce to 1 oz.
To protect Lincoln, a military guard called the Bucktail Brigade was stationed on the grounds.
The seeming ease with which he made common cause with the Federalists undermined his position at home, and soon the Bucktail faction (under the leadership of Martin Van Buren) stripped Clinton of his offices one by one.