buffalo


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Buf·fa·lo

 (bŭf′ə-lō′)
A city of western New York at the eastern end of Lake Erie on the Canadian border. It is a major Great Lakes port of entry and an important manufacturing and milling center.

Buf′fa·lo′ni·an adj. & n.

buf·fa·lo

 (bŭf′ə-lō′)
n. pl. buffalo or buf·fa·loes or buf·fa·los
1.
a. Any of several large African and Asian ruminant mammals of the family Bovidae, such as the water buffalo and the African buffalo.
b. The North American bison.
c. The flesh of the North American bison, used as food.
2. Any of several North American suckers of the genus Ictiobus, having a dark body and an arched back. Also called buffalo fish.
tr.v. buf·fa·loed, buf·fa·lo·ing, buf·fa·loes
1. To intimidate or frighten, as by a display of authority: "The board couldn't buffalo the federal courts as it had the Comptroller" (American Banker).
2. To confuse or deceive: "Too often ... job seekers have buffaloed lenders as to their competency and training" (H. Jane Lehman).

[Italian bufalo or Portuguese or Spanish búfalo, from Late Latin būfalus, from Latin būbalus, antelope, buffalo, from Greek boubalos, antelope, perhaps from bous, cow; see gwou- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: When most Americans hear the word buffalo, they probably think of the American bison. In fact, buffalo originally referred to the water buffalo (an animal that was introduced to western Europe from Asia in late antiquity) and other large bovid animals of Eurasia and Africa. The history of buffalo begins with the Greek word boubalos, "antelope." The Romans borrowed this word as būbalus, "antelope." In his work on natural history, however, the Roman author Pliny the Elder notes that the common people used būbalus to refer to the urus, the huge wild ox (now extinct) that once roamed northern Europe, and Pliny considered this to be a mistake. Eventually the Latin word, in its Late Latin form būfalus, became the name for the water buffalo when it was introduced to Europe. Būfalus developed into buffalo in Italian and búfalo in Portuguese and Spanish, and then English borrowed buffalo, with the sense "any of various species of large bovine animals," from one or more of these languages. How did the word buffalo come to be the popular name for the American bison? When the English first began to visit and settle in North America, it is likely that most of them had never seen the European bison, or wisent, the closest relative of the American bison. The wisent had mostly vanished from western Europe in the Middle Ages, the victim of hunting and deforestation. The English were probably much more familiar with domestic water buffalo, and they may even have heard of the urus, and so when they encountered the American bison, many of them called it by the name of the largest bovine animal they had known before, the buffalo. Already in 1625, English writers were using buffalo to describe the bison of America.

buffalo

(ˈbʌfəˌləʊ)
n, pl -loes or -lo
1. (Animals) Also called: Cape buffalo a member of the cattle tribe, Syncerus caffer, mostly found in game reserves in southern and eastern Africa and having upward-curving horns
2. (Animals) short for water buffalo
3. (Animals) Also called: bison US and Canadian a member of the cattle tribe, Bison bison, formerly widely distributed over the prairies of W North America but now confined to reserves and parks, with a massive head, shaggy forequarters, and a humped back.
vb (tr)
4. (often passive) to confuse
5. to intimidate
[C16: from Italian bufalo, from Late Latin būfalus, alteration of Latin būbalus; see bubal]

Buffalo

(ˈbʌfəˌləʊ)
n
(Placename) a port in W New York State, at the E end of Lake Erie. Pop: 285 018 (2003 est)

buf•fa•lo

(ˈbʌf əˌloʊ)

n., pl. -loes, -los, (esp. collectively) -lo, n.
1. any of several large wild oxen of the family Bovidae, as the bison or water buffalo.
2. a buffalofish.
v.t. Informal.
3. to puzzle or baffle; confuse.
4. to intimidate by a display of power, importance, etc.
adj.
5. patterned in buffalo plaid.
[1535–45; < Portuguese bufalo < Late Latin būfalus, variant of Latin būbalus < Greek boúbalos]

Buf•fa•lo

(ˈbʌf əˌloʊ)

n.
a port in W New York, on Lake Erie. 310,548.

buffalo


Past participle: buffaloed
Gerund: buffaloing

Imperative
buffalo
buffalo
Present
I buffalo
you buffalo
he/she/it buffalos
we buffalo
you buffalo
they buffalo
Preterite
I buffaloed
you buffaloed
he/she/it buffaloed
we buffaloed
you buffaloed
they buffaloed
Present Continuous
I am buffaloing
you are buffaloing
he/she/it is buffaloing
we are buffaloing
you are buffaloing
they are buffaloing
Present Perfect
I have buffaloed
you have buffaloed
he/she/it has buffaloed
we have buffaloed
you have buffaloed
they have buffaloed
Past Continuous
I was buffaloing
you were buffaloing
he/she/it was buffaloing
we were buffaloing
you were buffaloing
they were buffaloing
Past Perfect
I had buffaloed
you had buffaloed
he/she/it had buffaloed
we had buffaloed
you had buffaloed
they had buffaloed
Future
I will buffalo
you will buffalo
he/she/it will buffalo
we will buffalo
you will buffalo
they will buffalo
Future Perfect
I will have buffaloed
you will have buffaloed
he/she/it will have buffaloed
we will have buffaloed
you will have buffaloed
they will have buffaloed
Future Continuous
I will be buffaloing
you will be buffaloing
he/she/it will be buffaloing
we will be buffaloing
you will be buffaloing
they will be buffaloing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been buffaloing
you have been buffaloing
he/she/it has been buffaloing
we have been buffaloing
you have been buffaloing
they have been buffaloing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been buffaloing
you will have been buffaloing
he/she/it will have been buffaloing
we will have been buffaloing
you will have been buffaloing
they will have been buffaloing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been buffaloing
you had been buffaloing
he/she/it had been buffaloing
we had been buffaloing
you had been buffaloing
they had been buffaloing
Conditional
I would buffalo
you would buffalo
he/she/it would buffalo
we would buffalo
you would buffalo
they would buffalo
Past Conditional
I would have buffaloed
you would have buffaloed
he/she/it would have buffaloed
we would have buffaloed
you would have buffaloed
they would have buffaloed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buffalo - large shaggy-haired brown bison of North American plainsbuffalo - large shaggy-haired brown bison of North American plains
genus Bison - sometimes considered a subgenus of genus Bos: American buffalo
bison - any of several large humped bovids having shaggy manes and large heads and short horns
buffalo - meat from an American bison
2.Buffalo - a city on Lake Erie in western New York (near Niagara Falls)
Empire State, New York State, NY, New York - a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies
3.buffalo - meat from an American bison
American bison, American buffalo, Bison bison, buffalo - large shaggy-haired brown bison of North American plains
game - the flesh of wild animals that is used for food
4.buffalo - any of several Old World animals resembling oxen including, e.g., water buffalo; Cape buffalo
Bovidae, family Bovidae - true antelopes; cattle; oxen; sheep; goats
bovid - hollow-horned ruminants
Asiatic buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, water buffalo, water ox - an Asian buffalo that is often domesticated for use as a draft animal
anoa, Anoa depressicornis, dwarf buffalo - small buffalo of the Celebes having small straight horns
Anoa mindorensis, Bubalus mindorensis, tamarao, tamarau - small buffalo of Mindoro in the Philippines
Cape buffalo, Synercus caffer - large often savage buffalo of southern Africa having upward-curving horns; mostly in game reserves
Verb1.buffalo - intimidate or overawe
cow, overawe - subdue, restrain, or overcome by affecting with a feeling of awe; frighten (as with threats)

buffalo

noun
Related words
collective noun herd
Translations
ثَوْر امريكيجاموس، ثَوْرجاموسَة
биволбизон
buvolbizon
bøffelbisonbisonokse
BüffelBisonins Bockshorn jagenWisent
piison
puhvelibiisoni
bivol
bivalybölény
buffallvísundur
bufalobison
水牛
버팔로
buivolas
bifelisbizons
bøffelbison
bawółbizonpolować na bawoły
byvol
bivolbizon
buffelbisonoxe
กระบือ
бізонбуйвол
con trâu

buffalo

[ˈbʌfələʊ] N (buffalo or buffaloes (pl))
1.búfalo m
2. (esp US) (= bison) → bisonte m

buffalo

[ˈbʌfələʊ] [buffalo or buffaloes] (pl) n
(in Africa)buffle m
(in US) (= bison) → bison m

buffalo

n pl <-es>, collective pl <-> → Büffel m

buffalo

[ˈbʌfələʊ] n (buffaloes (pl)) (wild ox) → bufalo/a (esp Am) (bison) → bisonte m

buffalo

(ˈbafələu) plurals ˈbuffalo ~ˈbuffalo(e)s noun
1. a large kind of ox, especially the Asian and African varieties.
2. the American variety of ox; the bison.

buffalo

جاموسَة buvol bøffel Büffel βούβαλος búfalo puhveli buffle bivol bufalo 水牛 버팔로 bizon bøffel bawół búfalo бизон buffel กระบือ bufalo con trâu 水牛
References in classic literature ?
Jake got on the front seat with Otto Fuchs, and I rode on the straw in the bottom of the wagon-box, covered up with a buffalo hide.
Pelagie was hurt and angry enough about it; and she ordered rugs and buffalo robes to be brought and laid thick upon the tiles, till the little one's steps were surer.
The Hurons drove him from the graves of his fathers, as they would chase the hunted buffalo.
Tell me, why this strong young colt, foaled in some peaceful valley of Vermont, far removed from all beasts of prey --why is it that upon the sunniest day, if you but shake a fresh buffalo robe behind him, so that he cannot even see it, but only smells its wild animal muskiness --why will he start, snort, and with bursting eyes paw the ground in phrensies of affright?
Comparing the humped herds of whales with the humped herds of buffalo, which, not forty years ago, overspread by tens of thousands the prairies of Illinois and Missouri, and shook their iron manes and scowled with their thunder-clotted brows upon the sites of populous river-capitals, where now the polite broker sells you land at a dollar an inch; in such a comparison an irresistible argument would seem furnished, to show that the hunted whale cannot now escape speedy extinction.
It would catch his feet and try to trip him; it would build itself into a wall before him to beat him back; and he would fling himself into it, plunging like a wounded buffalo, puffing and snorting in rage.
Buffalo Bill taught me the most of what I know, my mother taught me much, and I taught myself the rest.
Jim came skipping out at the gate with a tin pail, and singing Buffalo Gals.
At last I found the little buffalo path I sought, and turned along it.
Everybody knew Bagheera, and nobody cared to cross his path; for he was as cunning as Tabaqui, as bold as the wild buffalo, and as reckless as the wounded elephant.
Every day she comes and beats me with a whip of buffalo hide.
Hall wrote from Buffalo that his exchange with twelve boys had become "a perfect Bedlam.