buffalo robe

buffalo robe

n.
The dressed skin of the North American bison, used as a lap robe, cape, or blanket.

buf′falo robe`


n.
the prepared skin of an American bison, with the hair left on, used as a lap robe, rug, etc.
[1675–85, Amer.]
References in classic literature ?
She got so cold that we made her hide her head under the buffalo robe.
I piled straw and buffalo robes into the box, and took two hot bricks wrapped in old blankets.
The girls had on cotton dresses under their shawls; they kept shivering beneath the buffalo robes and hugging each other for warmth.
Tell me, why this strong young colt, foaled in some peaceful valley of Vermont, far removed from all beasts of prey --why is it that upon the sunniest day, if you but shake a fresh buffalo robe behind him, so that he cannot even see it, but only smells its wild animal muskiness --why will he start, snort, and with bursting eyes paw the ground in phrensies of affright?
The latter was squatted on his buffalo robe, his strong features and red skin glaring in the broad light of a blazing fire, while he recounted astounding tales of the bloody exploits of his tribe and himself in their wars with the Pawnees; for there are no old soldiers more given to long campaigning stories than Indian "braves.
He gazed for a time in mute bewilderment upon his victim; then drawing his buffalo robe over his head, he sat down beside the corpse, and remained brooding over his crime and his loss.
When an Indian chief comes among his white fathers," returned Duncan, with great steadiness, "he lays aside his buffalo robe, to carry the shirt that is offered him.
Pelagie was hurt and angry enough about it; and she ordered rugs and buffalo robes to be brought and laid thick upon the tiles, till the little one's steps were surer.
Typically, the transferor sets out a buffalo robe on the ground with the item to be transferred as well as other items used in the ceremony.
The men in winter wear a leathern shirt & cloth leggings, with a Buffalo robe thrown over their shoulders & in summer their suit of clothes is limited to a Blanket.
While coping with the loss of buffalo and the ensuing violent attacks from Blackfoot bands, many Cree leaders, especially leaders on the eastern fringes of the plains near places like Fort Carlton, recognized they also faced another, possibly more significant challenge: the increasing settlement of the North Saskatchewan River valley by Metis settlers, many of whom had moved west and north from Red River to participate in the buffalo robe trade.
It was inspired by a buffalo robe painting from Native American artist Steve Tamayo.
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