buffering


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buff·er 1

 (bŭf′ər)
n.
1. One that buffs, especially a piece of soft leather or cloth used to shine or polish.
2. A buffing wheel.

buff·er 2

 (bŭf′ər)
n.
1. Something that lessens or absorbs the shock of an impact.
2. One that protects by intercepting or moderating adverse pressures or influences: "A sense of humor ... may have served as a buffer against the ... shocks of disappointment" (James Russell Lowell).
3. Something that separates potentially antagonistic entities, as an area between two rival powers that serves to lessen the danger of conflict.
4. Chemistry A solution that resists a change in acidity when an acid or base is added to it, or a substance that facilitates this resistance.
5. Computers A device or area used to store data temporarily.
tr.v. buff·ered, buff·er·ing, buff·ers
1. To act as a buffer for or between.
2. Chemistry To treat (a solution) with a buffer.
3. Computers To hold or collect (data) in a buffer.

[Probably from obsolete buff, to make a sound like a soft body being hit, of imitative origin.]

buffering

(ˈbʌfərɪŋ)
n
(Computer Science) computing temporary storage of data
Translations

buffering

[ˈbʌfərɪŋ] N (Comput) → almacenamiento m en memoria intermedia

buffering

[ˈbʌfərɪŋ] n (COMPUTING) (= storage) → mise f en mémoire tampon (= use) → utilisation f de la mémoire tamponbuffer memory n (COMPUTING)mémoire f tamponbuffer state nétat m tamponbuffer zone nzone f tampon

buffering

n (Comput) → Pufferung f

buffering

[ˈbʌfərɪŋ] n (Comput) → bufferizzazione f, memorizzazione f transitoria
References in periodicals archive ?
In many low-power but high-speed ADCs, the input pins are directly connected to the sample/hold circuit, without buffering or isolation.
Simulations make the case for uneven buffering, placed appropriately between workstations.
The differential speed from the infeed and discharge conveyors determines the position of the transfer carriage and thus the storage capacity that can be used for buffering.
This study offers promise that farmers will be able to gain income from the buffers while keeping their buffering capacities at peak levels.
Rather, buffering should begin in the fields and headwater reaches where most of the runoff, sediment, and chemical pollutants first enter the channel system.
A robust network, data buffering, and high-performance storage management solutions are needed too.
Each I/O subsystem uses its own buffering or caching mechanism, and applications generally maintain their own private I/O buffers.
A restatement of the first question is: "Which work stations need buffering against the variations in the flow of parts from other work centres?
Express Logic's ThreadX V5 introduced many new and useful features, including performance statistics collection and event-trace buffering.
The main bottleneck in these types of designs is the speed of the memory chips that are being used by the XOR engine for its data buffering (Fig 1).