buffoon

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buf·foon

 (bə-fo͞on′)
n.
1. A clown; a jester: a court buffoon.
2. A person given to clowning and joking.
3. A ludicrous or bumbling person; a fool.

[French bouffon, from Old Italian buffone, from buffa, jest, from buffare, to puff, of imitative origin.]

buf·foon′er·y (bə-fo͞o′nə-rē) n.

buffoon

(bəˈfuːn)
n
1. a person who amuses others by ridiculous or odd behaviour, jokes, etc
2. a foolish person
[C16: from French bouffon, from Italian buffone, from Medieval Latin būfō, from Latin: toad]
bufˈfoonery n

buf•foon

(bəˈfun)

n.
1. a person who amuses others by jokes, pranks, etc.
2. a person given to coarse or offensive joking.
[1540–50; earlier buffon < French < Italian buffone=buff- (expressive base) + -one agent suffix]
buf•foon′er•y, n.
buf•foon′ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buffoon - a rude or vulgar foolbuffoon - a rude or vulgar fool    
fool, muggins, saphead, tomfool, sap - a person who lacks good judgment
2.buffoon - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behaviorbuffoon - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior
comedian, comic - a professional performer who tells jokes and performs comical acts
harlequin - a clown or buffoon (after the Harlequin character in the commedia dell'arte)
jester, motley fool, fool - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
whiteface - a clown whose face is covered with white make-up
zany - a buffoon in one of the old comedies; imitates others for ludicrous effect

buffoon

noun clown, fool, comic, comedian, wag, joker, jester, dag (N.Z. informal), harlequin, droll, silly billy (informal), joculator or (fem.) joculatrix, merry-andrew a drunken buffoon
Translations
ilveilijänarripelle

buffoon

[bəˈfuːn] Nbufón m, payaso m

buffoon

[bʌˈfuːn] nbouffon m, pitre m

buffoon

nClown m; (stupid) → Blödmann m (pej inf); to act or play the buffoonden Clown or Hanswurst spielen

buffoon

[bəˈfuːn] nbuffone/a
to play the buffoon → fare il/la buffone/a
References in classic literature ?
Look at the faces of the actors and buffoons when they come off from their business; and Tom Fool washing the paint off his cheeks before he sits down to dinner with his wife and the little Jack Puddings behind the canvas.
There were buffoons, there were improvisatori, there were ballet-dancers, there were musicians, there was Beauty, there was wine.
She must not be touched by the buffoons, nor by the ignorant vulgar, incapable of comprehending or appreciating her hidden treasures.
At a country fair there was a Buffoon who made all the people laugh by imitating the cries of various animals.
When he was just midway across, the little door opened once more, and a gaudily-dressed fellow like a buffoon sprang out, and went rapidly after the first one.
Sombre is human life, and as yet without meaning: a buffoon may be fateful to it.
Now we find the poets never represent Jupiter himself as singing and playing; nay, we ourselves treat the professors of these arts as mean people, and say that no one would practise them but a drunkard or a buffoon.
If you, sir, choose to make a buffoon of yourself," he said sharply, with a slight trembling of the lower jaw, "I can't prevent your doing so; but I warn you that if you dare to play the fool in my presence, I will teach you to behave yourself.
WHY is Birmingham blessed with such idiots and buffoons as MP Jess Phillips and Lord Mayor elect, Muhammad Afzal?
The palaces of Westminster have always been the sanctuary of buffoons and I would have little difficulty in naming a growing list of politicians who would qualify for such an adjective.
Alabama = Avid, livid, animated buffoons attacking modern art
Fortunately British hopes of success at Wimbledon this year remain intact as Andy Murray is Scottish and has been genetically programmed over many generations to ignore upper class English buffoons.