buggy


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bug·gy 1

 (bŭg′ē)
n. pl. bug·gies
1. A small, light, one-horse carriage usually having four wheels in the United States and two wheels in Great Britain.
2. A baby carriage.
3. A passenger or recreational vehicle, usually with oversized tires, designed for off-road use.
4. Informal An automobile.
5. Chiefly Southern US A shopping cart, especially for groceries.

[Origin unknown.]

bug·gy 2

 (bŭg′ē)
adj. bug·gi·er, bug·gi·est
1. Infested with bugs.
2. Computers Having many software bugs: a buggy program.
3. Slang Crazy.

bug′gi·ness n.

buggy

(ˈbʌɡɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a light horse-drawn carriage having either four wheels (esp in the US and Canada) or two wheels (esp in Britain and India)
2. (Automotive Engineering) short for beach buggy
3. short for Baby Buggy See baby carriage
4. (Automotive Engineering) a small motorized vehicle designed for a particular purpose: a golf buggy; a moon buggy.
[C18: of unknown origin]

buggy

(ˈbʌɡɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
1. infested with bugs
2. slang US insane
3. (Computer Science) informal (of a system or machine, esp a computer program) containing errors or faults
ˈbugginess n

bug•gy1

(ˈbʌg i)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a light, four-wheeled, horse-drawn carriage with a single seat and a transverse spring.
3. Older Use. an automobile, esp. a dilapidated one.
[1765–75]

bug•gy2

(ˈbʌg i)

adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
1. infested with bugs.
2. Slang. crazy; insane.
[1705–15]
bug′gi•ness, n.

Buggy

A light four-wheeled conveyance intended for personal transportation. It was an American invention that was designed specifically to provide a fast, soft ride. The soft ride was accomplished by means of a light frame and ellipse-shaped springs mounted between the axles and the frame and oriented parallel with the axles. Buggies were generally pulled by one horse, had only one bench-like seat, and had a waterproof top that was usually made of leather. They were more comfortable for traveling than by horseback and were preferred by ladies, the elderly, and families with small children. Doctors, who often were called out in inclement weather, also favored them. Buggies did, however, have the disadvantage of requiring smoother ground to travel over than that required by a horse and rider.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buggy - a small lightweight carriagebuggy - a small lightweight carriage; drawn by a single horse
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
Adj.1.buggy - informal or slang terms for mentally irregularbuggy - informal or slang terms for mentally irregular; "it used to drive my husband balmy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"
2.buggy - infested with bugs
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"

buggy

adjective
Slang. Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Chiefly British: crackers.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
Translations
عَرَبَة أَطُفالعَرَبَةُ الحِصان
bryčkakočárek
kærreklapvogn
rattaat
dječja kolica
homokfutó
eineykisvagn
一頭立て軽装馬車
경마차
nelieli, viegli rati
brička
barnvagn
รถเล็กไม่มีประตู
paytonpuset
xe đẩy trẻ em

buggy

[ˈbʌgɪ] N
1. (also baby buggy) (Brit) (= pushchair) → sillita f de paseo (US) (= pram) → cochecito m (de niño)
2. (horse-drawn) → calesa f
3. (Golf) → cochecito m
see also beach, moon

buggy

[ˈbʌgi] n
(= pram) → landau m
(= carriage) → boghei m

buggy

n (with horse) → Buggy m, → leichter Einspänner; (baby) buggy (Brit) → Sportwagen m; (US) → Kinderwagen m

buggy

[ˈbʌgɪ] n (also baby buggy) → passeggino; (cart, two-wheeled) → calesse m; (four-wheeled) → baghero

buggy

(ˈbagi) plural ˈbuggies noun
a light, open, one-horse vehicle.

buggy

عَرَبَة أَطُفال kočárek klapvogn Buggy τετράτροχο μόνιππο carrito, sillita de paseo rattaat poussette dječja kolica passeggino 一頭立て軽装馬車 경마차 buggy paraplytrille wózek carrinho de bebé, carrinho de bebê детская коляска barnvagn รถเล็กไม่มีประตู puset xe đẩy trẻ em 婴儿车
References in classic literature ?
The remodeled lunch being gaily partaken of, the studio and garden visited, and art discussed with enthusiasm, Amy ordered a buggy (alas for the elegant cherry-bounce), and drove her friend quietly about the neighborhood till sunset, when `the party went out'.
The habit had been formed as he sat in his buggy behind the jaded white horse and went slowly along country roads.
The young man was engaged to be married to the young lady, and they sometimes called upon Margaret, driving over of afternoons in a buggy.
40 steppers and a skeleton buggy to meet you at the top of the hill and drive you over to the cabin.
The most uncanny thing about this neighborhood was the number of the children; you thought there must be a school just out, and it was only after long acquaintance that you were able to realize that there was no school, but that these were the children of the neighborhood--that there were so many children to the block in Packingtown that nowhere on its streets could a horse and buggy move faster than a walk!
Here the conversation was interrupted by the approach of a small one-horse buggy to the inn.
On the 17th of February, 1835, he sold the old carriage and bought a cheap second-hand buggy--said a buggy was just the trick to skim along mushy, slushy early spring roads with, and he had always wanted to try a buggy on those mountain roads, anyway.
They entered his buggy with him and were paraded down the main street, everybody flocking to the windows and sidewalks to see.
Simpson speedily bartered with a man "over Wareham way," and got in exchange for it an old horse which his owner did not need, as he was leaving town to visit his daughter for a year, Simpson fattened the aged animal, keeping him for several weeks (at early morning or after nightfall) in one neighbor's pasture after another, and then exchanged him with a Milltown man for a top buggy.
And you could drive a buggy through the roof anywhere," said George.
Long after Robinson's buggy was out of sight, Martin stood in his doorway and stared at the five handsome figures, spelled out the even more convincing words and admired the excellent reproduction of The First State Bank.
The "smash-up" it was-I gathered from the same informant-which, besides drawing the red gash across Ethan Frome's forehead, had so shortened and warped his right side that it cost him a visible effort to take the few steps from his buggy to the post-office window.