bullfinch


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bull·finch

 (bo͝ol′fĭnch′)
n.
1. A European bird (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) having a short thick bill and in the male a red breast, blue-gray back, and black head, wings, and tail.
2. Any of several similar finches.

bullfinch

(ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ)
n
1. (Animals) a common European finch, Pyrrhula pyrrhula: the male has a bright red throat and breast, black crown, wings, and tail, and a grey-and-white back
2. (Animals) any of various similar finches
[C14: see bull1, finch; probably so called from its stocky shape and thick neck]

bullfinch

(ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ)
n
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) Brit a high thick hedge too difficult for a horse and rider to jump
[C19: perhaps changed from the phrase bull fence]

bull•finch

(ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ)

n.
a Eurasian finch, Pyrrhula pyrrhula, the male of which has a black, white, and bluish-gray back with a rosy breast.
[1560–70; bull1 (perhaps in sense “bull-necked”) + finch]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bullfinch - United States architect who designed the Capitol Building in Washington which served as a model for state capitols throughout the United States (1763-1844)
2.bullfinch - common European finch mostly black and white with red throat and breastbullfinch - common European finch mostly black and white with red throat and breast
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
genus Pyrrhula, Pyrrhula - bullfinches
Translations
hýl obecný
punatulkku
gil

bullfinch

[ˈbʊlfɪntʃ] Ncamachuelo m

bullfinch

[ˈbʊlfɪntʃ] nbouvreuil m

bullfinch

[ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ] nciuffolotto
References in classic literature ?
If they had said I was niece to a piping bullfinch, what would you care?
Bullfinch will fetch his price any day, only you'd better sell him in this country, because the dealers have so many bills of mine, and so I'd rather he shouldn't go back to England.
In that time I have had five species of butterfly, four species of moth, four species of bee, jays, dunnocks, robins, blackbirds, starlings, blue crest coal and long-tailed tits, wrens, house sparrows, goldfinch, bullfinch, siskin, bladicap and great crested woodpecker.
Police said that the arrests in Oxford were not linked to the recent Operation Bullfinch court cases.
The collared doves and rock doves too Contribute to the hullabaloo, Then a flash of colour, lovely red, When the bullfinch shows his head.
a place where I remember seeing my first stunning male bullfinch as a child.
The family requests that flowers be omitted and donations in Norma's memory be made to Make-A-Wish, 1 Bullfinch Place, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA 02114.
For herself, she chooses the bullfinch, but changes her mind to a "comical" puffin, while Packham - who Strachan worked with on kids' wildlife series The Really Wild Show in the Eighties and Nineties - takes the "dashing" sparrowhawk, who you "never see enough of".
Teaching birds to imitate human melodies was a popular hobby in the 18th and 19th centuries and the bullfinch was the favourite species.
Over the next three weeks the Springwatch cameras will be covering a new area of the reserve for the first time revealing the wet woodland, reed-bed, and rare bog areas of the reserve, to follow the lives of lapwing, redshank, teal, reed bunting, sedge warbler and, with luck, stonechat and bullfinch.
The specially-bred birds were worth a total of around PS8,500 and included an extremely rare white bullfinch with pink eyes and a white beak - it is believed there are only two of its kind in the world and it alone is thought to be worth PS1,000.
Tyseley-based Bullfinch Gas was awarded the contract to supply the allweather gas burners system being fitted into 8,000 Olympic and 620 Paralympic torches.