bullying


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bul·ly 1

 (bo͝ol′ē)
n. pl. bul·lies
1. A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.
2. A hired ruffian; a thug.
3. A pimp.
4. Archaic A fine person.
5. Archaic A sweetheart.
v. bul·lied, bul·ly·ing, bul·lies
v.tr.
1. To treat in an overbearing or intimidating manner. See Synonyms at intimidate.
2. To make (one's way) aggressively.
v.intr.
1. To behave like a bully.
2. To force one's way aggressively or by intimidation: "They bully into line at the gas pump" (Martin Gottfried).
adj.
Excellent; splendid: did a bully job of persuading the members.
interj.
Used to express approval: Bully for you!

[Possibly from Middle Dutch boele, sweetheart, probably alteration of broeder, brother; see bhrāter- in Indo-European roots.]

bul·ly 2

 (bo͝ol′ē)
n.
Canned or pickled beef. Also called bully beef.

[Perhaps French bouilli, boiled meat, label on canned beef, from past participle of bouillir, to boil, from Old French boilir; see boil1.]

bullying

(ˈbʊlɪɪŋ)
n
the intimidation of weaker people
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bullying - the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do somethingbullying - the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do something
aggression - deliberately unfriendly behavior
frightening, terrorisation, terrorization - the act of inspiring with fear
Adj.1.bullying - noisily domineering; tending to browbeat others
domineering - tending to domineer
Translations

bullying

[ˈbʊlɪɪŋ]
A. ADJ [person] → matón, valentón; [attitude] → amedrentador, propio de matón
B. Nintimidación f, abuso m

bullying

[ˈbʊliɪŋ] nbrimades fplbullying tactics nmanœuvres fpl d'intimidation

bullying

adj person, mannertyrannisch; boss, wife alsoherrisch
nTyrannisieren nt, → Schikanieren nt; (with violence) → Drangsalieren nt; (= coercion)Anwendung fvon Druck (→ of auf +acc)

bullying

[ˈbʊlɪɪŋ]
1. nprepotenze fpl
2. adj (person, tone, behaviour) → prepotente

bullying

n acoso, intimidación f, hostigamiento
References in classic literature ?
He resolved that nobody should be witness of his encounter with Tom; and determined, if he could not subdue him by bullying, to defer his vengeance, to be wreaked in a more convenient season.
Carton," said his friend, squaring himself at him with a bullying air, as if the fire-grate had been the furnace in which sustained endeavour was forged, and the one delicate thing to be done for the old Sydney Carton of old Shrewsbury School was to shoulder him into it, "your way is, and always was, a lame way.
The worst of it was that that bullying old Pumblechook, preyed upon by a devouring curiosity to be informed of all I had seen and heard, came gaping over in his chaise-cart at tea-time, to have the details divulged to him.
You have a habit of bullying women who are weak enough to fear you.
This crew's dissatisfied; this crew don't vally bullying a marlin-spike; this crew has its rights like other crews, I'll make so free as that; and by your own rules, I take it we can talk together.
There were very few people about, and though the sun was bright, and the air clear and fresh, the big, grim-looking waves, that seemed dark themselves because the foam that topped them was like snow, forced themselves in through the mouth of the harbour, like a bullying man going through a crowd.
But as to frightening or bullying, or even wheedling some sort of answer out of Mr.
He was a noisy, boisterous, reckless lad, whose good-natured eye contradicted the bluntness and bullying tenor of his speech.
They suspected, among many others, the bullying, red-bearded horsedealer whose caravans ploughed through their fastnesses belly-deep in snow.
His bullying, overbearing manner was all gone too, and he cringed along at my companion's side like a dog with its master.
They have that most dismal experience of being in a strange vessel, among strange people who care nothing about them, and of undergoing the customary bullying by strange officers and the insolence of strange servants, repeated over and over again within the compass of every month.
He had already quite a collection of prizes, worthless books on bad paper, but in gorgeous bindings decorated with the arms of the school: his position had freed him from bullying, and he was not unhappy.