bulrush


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bul·rush

 (bo͝ol′rŭsh′)
n.
1. Any of various aquatic or wetland sedges chiefly of the genus Scirpus, having grasslike leaves and usually clusters of small, often brown spikelets.
2. Any of several wetland plants of similar aspect, such as the papyrus and the cattail.

[Middle English bulrish : perhaps alteration (influenced by bule, bull) of bole, stem; see bole1 + rish, rush; see rush2.]

bulrush

(ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ)
n
1. (Plants) a grasslike cyperaceous marsh plant, Scirpus lacustris, used for making mats, chair seats, etc
2. (Plants) a popular name for reed mace1
3. (Bible) a biblical word for papyrus1
[C15 bulrish, bul- perhaps from bull1 + rish rush2, referring to the largeness of the plant; sense 2 derived from the famous painting by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912), Dutch-born English painter, of the finding of the infant Moses in the "bulrushes" — actually reed mace]

bul•rush

(ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ)

n.
2. any of various rushes of the genera Scirpus, of the sedge family, and Typha, of the cattail family.
[1400–50; late Middle English bulrish papyrus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bulrush - tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of downbulrush - tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of down; its long flat leaves are used for making mats and chair seats; of North America, Europe, Asia and North Africa
cattail - tall erect herbs with sword-shaped leaves; cosmopolitan in fresh and salt marshes
2.bulrush - tall rush with soft erect or arching stems found in Eurasia, Australia, New Zealand, and common in North America
rush - grasslike plants growing in wet places and having cylindrical often hollow stems
genus Juncus, Juncus - type genus of the Juncaceae; perennial tufted glabrous marsh plants of temperate regions: rushes
Translations
الدّيس: عُشْبَةٌ مائِيَّه
rákos
skúfgras; sef
meldas
meldrs
hasır otusaz

bulrush

[ˈbʊlrʌʃ] Nespadaña f

bulrush

nRohrkolben m; in the bulrushesim Schilfrohr

bulrush

[ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ] nstiancia

bulrush

(ˈbulraʃ) noun
a tall strong water plant.
References in classic literature ?
Above, the sky would be of a cold blue colour, save for a fringe of flame-coloured streaks on the horizon that kept turning ever paler and paler; and when the moon had come out there would be wafted through the limpid air the sounds of a frightened bird fluttering, of a bulrush rubbing against its fellows in the gentle breeze, and of a fish rising with a splash.
But don't move a step forward, or your life is not worth a bulrush.
The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former.
Wright is a man of action, harpoon in hand, searching for the orange glow in the bulrush.
Other suitable plants are floating aquatics and aerators plus the slim-fit, stripy-leaved rush Zebrinus, corkscrew rush and mini bulrush, Typha minima.
In some cases, anthropogenic burning is used to control bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus), enabling the plant, according to those who extract this fiber, to grow in a way that keeps the tissue free of pests (Aponte et al.
Today Sweetgrass basket making involves four woven ingredients, including bulrush (Scirpus lacustris), long leaf pine needles (pinus palustris), sweetgrass (muhlenbergia), sewn with strips of palmetto leaf (Sabal palmetto).
The primary focus of BFA will be on guiding the responsible selection and harvesting of feedstocks such as sugar cane, corn, bulrush and switchgrass used to make plastics from agricultural materials.
We do our best to bring all the important, particularly the traditional products like nagra, kolapuri traditional slippers, world-renowned Faisalabad textile from major cities of Pakistan, including silk for wedding dresses, ready-to-wear hand-made clothes from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa which Pathan ladies wear, leather products, hand-made carpets and the handicrafts made of bulrush sticks from the plant that grows abundantly only in Pakistan.
The authors have, for decades, taught courses on locating and preparing local plants: this pairs recipes with insights on plant properties and provides a peppering international dishes that use the plants, from Softstem Bulrush to Black Locust Flower Fritters.
The biodegradable plastics chosen were bagasse, a bagasse bamboo blend, polylactic acid, wheatstraw (a composite of lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose, (10) fiber pulp (recycled paper fiberl (11)), potato starch (a potato based resin (12)), and a bamboo bulrush (a composite of neutral and acid detergent fiber, hemicellulose, cellulose, lignin and ash (13)) wheatstraw blend.