bulrush


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bul·rush

 (bo͝ol′rŭsh′)
n.
1. Any of various aquatic or wetland sedges chiefly of the genus Scirpus, having grasslike leaves and usually clusters of small, often brown spikelets.
2. Any of several wetland plants of similar aspect, such as the papyrus and the cattail.

[Middle English bulrish : perhaps alteration (influenced by bule, bull) of bole, stem; see bole1 + rish, rush; see rush2.]

bulrush

(ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ)
n
1. (Plants) a grasslike cyperaceous marsh plant, Scirpus lacustris, used for making mats, chair seats, etc
2. (Plants) a popular name for reed mace1
3. (Bible) a biblical word for papyrus1
[C15 bulrish, bul- perhaps from bull1 + rish rush2, referring to the largeness of the plant; sense 2 derived from the famous painting by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912), Dutch-born English painter, of the finding of the infant Moses in the "bulrushes" — actually reed mace]

bul•rush

(ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ)

n.
2. any of various rushes of the genera Scirpus, of the sedge family, and Typha, of the cattail family.
[1400–50; late Middle English bulrish papyrus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bulrush - tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of downbulrush - tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of down; its long flat leaves are used for making mats and chair seats; of North America, Europe, Asia and North Africa
cattail - tall erect herbs with sword-shaped leaves; cosmopolitan in fresh and salt marshes
2.bulrush - tall rush with soft erect or arching stems found in Eurasia, Australia, New Zealand, and common in North America
rush - grasslike plants growing in wet places and having cylindrical often hollow stems
genus Juncus, Juncus - type genus of the Juncaceae; perennial tufted glabrous marsh plants of temperate regions: rushes
Translations
الدّيس: عُشْبَةٌ مائِيَّه
rákos
skúfgras; sef
meldas
meldrs
hasır otusaz

bulrush

[ˈbʊlrʌʃ] Nespadaña f

bulrush

nRohrkolben m; in the bulrushesim Schilfrohr

bulrush

[ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ] nstiancia

bulrush

(ˈbulraʃ) noun
a tall strong water plant.
References in classic literature ?
Above, the sky would be of a cold blue colour, save for a fringe of flame-coloured streaks on the horizon that kept turning ever paler and paler; and when the moon had come out there would be wafted through the limpid air the sounds of a frightened bird fluttering, of a bulrush rubbing against its fellows in the gentle breeze, and of a fish rising with a splash.
The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former.
But don't move a step forward, or your life is not worth a bulrush.
Bulrush and cattail might prevent establishment of these other species in the cienega due to deep thatch and dense roots.
The slopes adjacent to the stream channel, for example, were planted with various oak species, black willow, red maple and elderberry while the wetlands area includes bulrush, arrow arum, wild rice, horsetail, arrowhead, water lilly, sago pondweed, water celery, duckweed and elodea.
These activities have encouraged reestablishment of a diverse wetland plant species community, replacing monospecific stands of bulrush now dominating Tule Lake.
Dow a]so put in alkali bulrush to keep down the wave action.
Viscose fibre is made from lumber, bulrush, linter or cellolose via a chemical process.
Unless we're hit by a frigid cold front, the January full moon phase kicks off the bulk of the crappie spawning season, when the big females start schooling up in deeper water before moving into shallow grass lines, bulrush and other cover to deposit their eggs.
After getting permission to a private 200-acre marsh interspersed with bulrush and cattail, we set an assortment of floaters within 25 yards of our hide, some emergent vegetation, and were ready for the ducks by mid-afternoon.
The nest was in a reed (Phragmites australis) floodplain marsh; the marsh vegetation consisted of reed, cattail (Typha angustifolia), and common bulrush (Scirpus planiculmis).
The theory is plants with runners such as strawberries and those with creeping stems such as bulrush, above, and ground elder can inform the rest of the plant about their status.