bumble-bee

Related to bumble-bee: Bombus
Translations

bumble-bee

(ˈbamblbiː) noun
a kind of large bee with a hairy body.
References in classic literature ?
said Toto, and ran away at a mad gallop to chase a bumble-bee.
With no little astonishment, Benassis beheld Genestas pacing to and fro in the salon, like a bumble-bee in quest of an exit from the room which he has incautiously entered.
It might have been at a trespassing bumble-bee however.
But mice eat bumble-bees and cats eat mice and old maids keep cats.
Then others of the boys spread over the downs, looking for the holes of humble-bees and mice, which they dug up without mercy, often (I regret to say) killing and skinning the unlucky mice, and (I do not regret to say) getting well stung by the bumble-bees.
Offenders forced entry to a paddock overnight on May 9 and removed a bumble-bee spring seesaw and a donkey, valued at pounds 2,500.
In late February and March you will probably see the most unmistakable species of all - the red-tailed bumble-bee.
There were 18 different bumble-bee species in Durham but we believe we are down to just six certain ones in people's gardens.
Ecologists are celebrating after spotting two rare species of bumble-bee in Warwickshire for the first time in more than 70 years.
They mimic the look and smell of plump bumble-bees to encourage insects to pollinate them.
I find from experiments that bumble-bees are almost indispensable to the fertilization of the heartsease (Viola tricolor), for other bees do not visit this flower.
Scientists studying bumble-bees have shown that sex with multiple partners helps strengthen a species against parasites and disease.