bump


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Related to bump: bump up

bump

 (bŭmp)
v. bumped, bump·ing, bumps
v.tr.
1. To strike or collide with: bumped the chair with a knee.
2. To cause to knock against an obstacle: bumped a knee against the chair.
3.
a. To knock to a new position; shift: bumped the crate out of the way.
b. To shake up and down; jolt: bumped the child on her knee; was bumped about on a rough flight.
4.
a. To displace from a position within a group or organization.
b. To deprive (a passenger) of reserved travel accommodations because of overbooking.
5. To raise; boost: bump up the price of gasoline.
6. Sports To pass (a volleyball) by redirecting it with the forearms.
v.intr.
1. To hit or knock against something: boxes bumping against one another in a truck.
2. To proceed with jerks and jolts: bumped along slowly over the rocky terrain.
3. Sports To bump a volleyball.
n.
1.
a. A blow, collision, or jolt.
b. The sound of something bumping: heard a loud bump in the dark.
2.
a. A raised or rounded spot; a bulge.
b. A slight swelling or lump.
c. Informal See baby bump.
3. A rise or increase, as in prices or enrollment.
4. A forward thrust of the pelvis, as in a burlesque striptease.
5. Sports A pass in volleyball made by redirecting the ball with the inside of the forearms, especially when extended and held together.
6. Slang
a. A small dose of an illegal drug, especially cocaine inhaled in powdered form.
b. A shot of hard liquor, sometimes accompanied by a beer chaser.
Phrasal Verbs:
bump into
To meet by chance: I often bump into him at the supermarket.
bump off Slang
To murder.

[Imitative.]

bump

(bʌmp)
vb
1. (when: intr, usually foll by against or into) to knock or strike with a jolt
2. (often foll by: along) to travel or proceed in jerks and jolts
3. (tr) to hurt by knocking: he bumped his head on the ceiling.
4. (tr) to knock out of place; dislodge: the crash bumped him from his chair.
5. (tr) Brit to throw (a child) into the air, one other child holding each limb, and let him or her down again to touch the ground
6. (Rowing) (in rowing races, esp at Oxford and Cambridge) to catch up with and touch (another boat that started a fixed distance ahead)
7. (Cricket) cricket to bowl (a ball) so that it bounces high on pitching or (of a ball) to bounce high when bowled
8. (Dancing) (intr) chiefly US and Canadian to dance erotically by thrusting the pelvis forward (esp in the phrase bump and grind)
9. (Card Games) (tr) poker to raise (someone)
10. (tr) informal to exclude a ticket-holding passenger from a flight as a result of overbooking
11. (tr) informal to displace (someone or something) from a previously allocated position: the story was bumped from the front page.
12. bump uglies slang US to have sexual intercourse
n
13. an impact; knock; jolt; collision
14. a dull thud or other noise from an impact or collision
15. the shock of a blow or collision
16. (Pathology) a lump on the body caused by a blow
17. a protuberance, as on a road surface
18. (Anatomy) any of the natural protuberances of the human skull, said by phrenologists to indicate underlying faculties and character
19. (Aeronautics) a rising current of air that gives an aircraft a severe upward jolt
20. (plural) the act of bumping a child. See sense 5
21. (Rowing) rowing the act of bumping. See bumping race
22. (Cricket) bump ball cricket a ball that bounces into the air after being hit directly into the ground by the batsman
[C16: probably of imitative origin]

bump

(bʌmp)

v.t.
1. to collide with; strike: The car bumped a truck.
2. to cause to strike or collide: He bumped the car against a tree.
3. to dislodge or displace by the force of collision.
4. Informal. to remove, dismiss, or eject: The airline bumped me from the flight.
5. Informal. to force upward; raise: Demand from abroad bumped up the price of corn.
6. Poker. raise (def. 22).
v.i.
7. to come in contact or collide with: She bumped into me.
8. to bounce along; proceed in a series of jolts: The old car bumped down the road.
9. to use pelvic bumps in erotic dancing.
10. bump into, to meet by chance.
11. bump off, Slang. to murder.
n.
12. a collision; blow.
13. a swelling from a blow.
14. a small area raised above the level of the surrounding surface; protuberance.
15. a rapidly rising current of air that gives an airplane a severe upward thrust.
16. a forward thrust of the pelvis for erotic effect.
[1560–70; imitative]

bump


Past participle: bumped
Gerund: bumping

Imperative
bump
bump
Present
I bump
you bump
he/she/it bumps
we bump
you bump
they bump
Preterite
I bumped
you bumped
he/she/it bumped
we bumped
you bumped
they bumped
Present Continuous
I am bumping
you are bumping
he/she/it is bumping
we are bumping
you are bumping
they are bumping
Present Perfect
I have bumped
you have bumped
he/she/it has bumped
we have bumped
you have bumped
they have bumped
Past Continuous
I was bumping
you were bumping
he/she/it was bumping
we were bumping
you were bumping
they were bumping
Past Perfect
I had bumped
you had bumped
he/she/it had bumped
we had bumped
you had bumped
they had bumped
Future
I will bump
you will bump
he/she/it will bump
we will bump
you will bump
they will bump
Future Perfect
I will have bumped
you will have bumped
he/she/it will have bumped
we will have bumped
you will have bumped
they will have bumped
Future Continuous
I will be bumping
you will be bumping
he/she/it will be bumping
we will be bumping
you will be bumping
they will be bumping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bumping
you have been bumping
he/she/it has been bumping
we have been bumping
you have been bumping
they have been bumping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bumping
you will have been bumping
he/she/it will have been bumping
we will have been bumping
you will have been bumping
they will have been bumping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bumping
you had been bumping
he/she/it had been bumping
we had been bumping
you had been bumping
they had been bumping
Conditional
I would bump
you would bump
he/she/it would bump
we would bump
you would bump
they would bump
Past Conditional
I would have bumped
you would have bumped
he/she/it would have bumped
we would have bumped
you would have bumped
they would have bumped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bump - a lump on the body caused by a blowbump - a lump on the body caused by a blow
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
2.bump - something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundingsbump - something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundings; "the gun in his pocket made an obvious bulge"; "the hump of a camel"; "he stood on the rocky prominence"; "the occipital protuberance was well developed"; "the bony excrescence between its horns"
frontal eminence - either prominence of the frontal bone above each orbit
occipital protuberance - prominence on the outer surface of the occipital bone
belly - a part that bulges deeply; "the belly of a sail"
caput - a headlike protuberance on an organ or structure; "the caput humeri is the head of the humerus which fits into a cavity in the scapula"
mogul - a bump on a ski slope
nub, nubble - a small lump or protuberance
snag - a sharp protuberance
wart - any small rounded protuberance (as on certain plants or animals)
projection - any solid convex shape that juts out from something
3.bump - an impact (as from a collision); "the bump threw him off the bicycle"
impact - the striking of one body against another
jolt, jounce, jar, shock - a sudden jarring impact; "the door closed with a jolt"; "all the jars and jolts were smoothed out by the shock absorbers"
concussion - any violent blow
rap, tap, strike - a gentle blow
bang, bash, smash, knock, belt - a vigorous blow; "the sudden knock floored him"; "he took a bash right in his face"; "he got a bang on the head"
buffeting, pounding - repeated heavy blows
sideswipe - a glancing blow from or on the side of something (especially motor vehicles)
slap, smack - a blow from a flat object (as an open hand)
Verb1.bump - knock against with force or violence; "My car bumped into the tree"
collide with, impinge on, hit, run into, strike - hit against; come into sudden contact with; "The car hit a tree"; "He struck the table with his elbow"
bump into, jar against, knock against, run into, butt against - collide violently with an obstacle; "I ran into the telephone pole"
2.bump - come upon, as if by accident; meet with; "We find this idea in Plato"; "I happened upon the most wonderful bakery not very far from here"; "She chanced upon an interesting book in the bookstore the other day"
3.bump - dance erotically or dance with the pelvis thrust forward; "bump and grind"
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
4.bump - assign to a lower position; reduce in rank; "She was demoted because she always speaks up"; "He was broken down to Sergeant"
assign, delegate, designate, depute - give an assignment to (a person) to a post, or assign a task to (a person)
sideline - remove from the center of activity or attention; place into an inferior position; "The outspoken cabinet member was sidelined by the President"
reduce - bring to humbler or weaker state or condition; "He reduced the population to slavery"
murder, off, bump off, slay, polish off, dispatch, remove, hit - kill intentionally and with premeditation; "The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered"
5.bump - remove or force from a position of dwelling previously occupied; "The new employee dislodged her by moving into her office space"
throw - cause to fall off; "The horse threw its inexperienced rider"
displace - cause to move, usually with force or pressure; "the refugees were displaced by the war"

bump

verb
1. knock, hit, strike, crash, smash, slam, bang He bumped his head on the low beam.
2. jerk, shake, bounce, rattle, jar, jog, lurch, jolt, jostle, jounce We left the road again and bumped over the mountainside.
noun
1. knock, hit, blow, shock, impact, rap, collision, thump Small children often cry after a minor bump.
2. thud, crash, knock, smash, bang, smack, thump, clump, wallop (informal), clunk, clonk I felt a little bump and knew instinctively what had happened.
3. lump, swelling, bulge, hump, node, nodule, protuberance, contusion She got a large bump on her forehead.
4. hump, lump The truck hit a bump and bounced.
bump into someone (Informal) meet, encounter, come across, run into, run across, meet up with, chance upon, happen upon, light upon I happened to bump into Mervyn Johns in the hallway.
bump into something crash into, knock, hit, strike, collide with, smash into, slam into, bang into They stopped moving and he almost bumped into them.
bump someone off (Slang) murder, kill, assassinate, remove, do in (slang), eliminate, take out (slang), wipe out (informal), dispatch, finish off, do away with, blow away (slang, chiefly U.S.), knock off (slang), liquidate, rub out (U.S. slang) They will probably bump you off anyway.
bump something up increase, raise, boost, expand, add to, heighten, enlarge, magnify, amplify, jack up, hoick The extra cost will bump up the price.

bump

verb
1. To come together or come up against with force:
2. To proceed with sudden, abrupt movements:
3. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
4. To lower in rank or grade:
Slang: bust.
phrasal verb
bump into
To find or meet by chance:
chance on (or upon), come across, come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
phrasal verb
bump off
Slang. To take the life of (a person or persons) unlawfully:
Informal: put away.
noun
1. Violent forcible contact between two or more things:
2. An unevenness or elevation on a surface:
3. A small raised area of skin resulting from a light blow or an insect sting, for example:
Translations
حَدْبَةٌصَدْمَةٌ، اصْطِدامضَرْبَةيَصْطَدِم بِ، يَلْتَقي صُدْفَةً
boulehrbolnáraznarazitrána
bumpramlestødstødeujævnhed
töyssy
sudar
dudorhuppanótompa ütéstompán megüt
kúla; ójafnareka í; rekast áskellur
衝突
충돌
atsitrenktiduobėtasgumbassusidurti sutrinktelėjimas
belziensgrambagrumbapunssasist
buškaizboklinanaletetitrčitiudarec
stöt
การชน
sự va mạnh

bump

[bʌmp]
A. N
1. (= blow, noise) → choque m, topetazo m; (= jolt of vehicle) → sacudida f (Aer) → rebote m; (in falling) → batacazo m
things that go bump in the nightcosas que hacen ruidos misteriosos en la noche
to come down to earth with a bumpvolver a la realidad de un golpe
2. (= swelling) → bollo m, abolladura f; (on skin) → chichón m, hinchazón f; (on road etc) → bache m
B. VT [+ car] → chocar contra
to bump one's headdarse un golpe en la cabeza
to bump one's head on a doordar con la cabeza contra una puerta
C. VI to bump along (= move joltingly) → avanzar dando sacudidas
the economy continues to bump along the bottom (Brit) → la economía continúa arrastrándose por los suelos
bump against VI + PREPchocar contra, topetar, dar contra
bump into VI + PREP
1. [+ person, vehicle] → chocar contra, dar con or contra
2. (= meet) → tropezar con, toparse con
fancy bumping into you!¡qué casualidad encontrarte aquí!
bump off VT + ADV (= kill) → cargarse a
bump up VT + ADV
1. (= increase) [+ price] → subir, aumentar
2. he was bumped up to first-class on his flight homeen el viaje de vuelta lo pusieron en primera clase
bump up against VI + PREP = bump into 1

bump

[ˈbʌmp]
n
(= blow) → coup m, choc m
(= jolt) → secousse f
(on head)bosse f; (on road)bosse f
(= minor accident) → accrochage m
We had a bump → Nous avons eu un accrochage.
to get a bump [car] → être tamponné(e)
vtheurter, cogner
[+ car] → emboutir
vi
to bump against sth → heurter qch
bump along
viavancer en cahotant
bump into
vt fus
(= collide with) [+ car] → tamponner; [+ person] → rentrer dans
We bumped into his car → Nous avons tamponné sa voiture.
He stopped suddenly and I bumped into him → Il s'est arrêté subitement et je lui suis rentré dedans.
to bump into sth [person] → se heurter contre qch
(= meet) to bump into sb → rencontrer qn par hasard
I bumped into Jane in the supermarket → J'ai rencontré Jane par hasard au supermarché.
bump up
vt (= increase) [+ amount, price] → faire grimper

bump

n
(= blow, noise, jolt)Bums m (inf); (of sth falling also)Plumps m (inf); to get a bump on the headsich (dat)den Kopf anschlagen; I accidentally gave her a bump on the chinich habe sie aus Versehen ans Kinn geboxt or gestoßen; he sat down with a bumper ließ sich plumpsen (inf); the car has had a few bumpsmit dem Auto hat es ein paar Mal gebumst (inf); each bump was agony as the ambulance …jede Erschütterung war eine Qual, als der Krankenwagen; bump and grind (inf)erotische Zuckungen pl; (= sex)Bumserei f (inf)
(on any surface) → Unebenheit f, → Hubbel m (inf); (on head, knee etc) → Beule f; (on car) → Delle f
(Aviat, = rising air current) → f
vt
stoßen (obj gegen); car wing etc, one’s own careine Delle fahren in (+acc); another carauffahren auf (+acc); to bump one’s head/kneesich (dat)den Kopf/das Knie anstoßen or anschlagen (→ on, against an +dat); her father bumped her up and down on his kneeihr Vater ließ sie auf den Knien reiten
(Sch inf) → hochwerfen
vi (= move joltingly)holpern; he fell and went bumping down the stairser stürzte und fiel polternd die Treppe hinunter; the economy is continuing to bump along the bottom (Brit) → die Wirtschaft befindet sich noch immer auf der Talsohle
adv to go bumpbumsen (inf); things that go bump in the nightGeräusche plim Dunkeln or in der Nacht

bump

[bʌmp]
1. n
a. (blow) → botta, colpo; (noise) → botto; (jolt of vehicle) → botta, scossa
b. (lump) → bernoccolo, bozzo, gonfiore m; (on skin) → gonfiore; (on road) → cunetta, bozzo
2. vt (car) → urtare, sbattere
to bump one's head → sbattere la testa
bump along viprocedere sobbalzando
bump into vi + prep
a. (vehicle) → andare a sbattere contro
b. (fam) (meet) → imbattersi in, incontrare per caso
fancy bumping into you! → ma guarda chi si vede!
bump off vt + adv (fam) → far fuori
bump up vt + adv (fam) (increase, prices) → far salire, far aumentare; (sales) → incrementare

bump

(bamp) verb
to knock or strike (something). She bumped into me; I bumped my head against the ceiling.
noun
1. (the sound of) a blow or knock. We heard a loud bump.
2. a swelling or raised part. a bump on the head; This road is full of bumps.
ˈbumper noun
a bar on a motor vehicle to lessen damage when it collides with anything.
adjective
excellent in some way, especially by being large. a bumper crop.
ˈbumpy adjective
uneven. a bumpy road.
bump into
to meet (someone) by accident. I bumped into him in the street.
bump of
(slang) to murder someone.

bump

ضَرْبَة náraz bump Plumps πρόσκρουση topetazo, tropezón töyssy bosse sudar urto 衝突 충돌 buil hump uderzenie pancada surda столкновение stöt การชน çarpma sự va mạnh 撞击

bump

n. golpe, [on the head] chichón;
v. tropezar; golpearse, darse un golpe.

bump

n bulto, nódulo (form), bola, (due to trauma, esp. about the head) chichón m
References in classic literature ?
Instantly, Sir What's-his-name recovered himself, pitched the tyrant out of the window, and turned to join the lady, victorious, but with a bump on his brow, found the door locked, tore up the curtains, made a rope ladder, got halfway down when the ladder broke, and he went headfirst into the moat, sixty feet below.
The shavings flew right and left; till at last the plane-iron came bump against an indestructible knot.
Did my spring-cart bump you about much in bringing you from the station?
I only know that there were three alarms before the bath was ready; and that on the occasion of the last and most desperate of all, I saw my aunt engage, single-handed, with a sandy-headed lad of fifteen, and bump his sandy head against her own gate, before he seemed to comprehend what was the matter.
He desired first to ask the time of day, and next--here, after a bump to the earth, one's thoughts ballooned again heavenwards--"had I seen a green copy of Shelley lying anywhere along the road?
I heard it go into the pantry, and the biscuit-tins rattled and a bottle smashed, and then came a heavy bump against the cellar door.
Now and again, from afar off, between the slam and bump of his shifting scenery, the glare of his manipulated limelight, and the controlled rolling of his thunder-drums, I catch his voice, lifted in encouragement and advice to his fellow-countrymen.
He slid to the ground, breathing heavily, and Kim could hear the over-driven heart bump and check.
A bump at the door silenced him and immediately Mr.
A bump arose at once on my sinciput, and turned out to be as pretty an organ of order as one shall see on a summer's day.
They won't mind a bump or two, and I've ordered new balls.
Jellyby, whose face reflected none of the uneasiness which we could not help showing in our own faces as the dear child's head recorded its passage with a bump on every stair--Richard afterwards said he counted seven, besides one for the landing--received us with perfect equanimity.