bunch grass


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bunch grass

or bunch·grass (bŭnch′grăs′)
n.
Any of various grasses that grow in clumps or tufts rather than forming a sod or mat.

bunch′ grass`


n.
any of various grasses in different regions of North America, growing in distinct clumps.
[1830–40, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bunch grass - any of various grasses of many genera that grow in tufts or clumps rather than forming a sod or matbunch grass - any of various grasses of many genera that grow in tufts or clumps rather than forming a sod or mat; chiefly of western United States
grass - narrow-leaved green herbage: grown as lawns; used as pasture for grazing animals; cut and dried as hay
References in classic literature ?
Their lodges were scattered in every direction, and their horses covered every hill for a great distance round, grazing upon the upland bunch grass which grew in great abundance, and though dry, retained its nutritious properties instead of losing them like other grasses in the autumn.
Horses and mules crop the bunch grass at the end of their lariats or browse on leaves along the creek.
This bunch grass commonly formed dense clumps that were 20-60 cm across, and nearly circular in outline.
Perennial ryegrass is a bunch grass suitable for hay, silage, or pasture.
Crabgrass, a type of bunch grass, will grow rapidly into matted clumps with nearly prostrate seed clusters.
Throughout the community of thatched houses scattered about the high country, children pounded sheaves of coya, a tough bunch grass that grows abundantly in the vicinity, to make it supple.
Bufflegrass (Pennisetum ciliare), a perennial bunch grass from Africa introduced as cattle feed, has been planted in rangelands in Texas, occupies more than 2 million acres in Sonora, Mexico, and is invading other desert lands in Arizona expansion to the north and into higher elevations has been limited by winter cold.
Fewer than 600 remain because the bunch grass is being bulldozed to make way for new grazing for sheep and cattle.