bunches


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bunch

 (bŭnch)
n.
1.
a. A group of things growing close together; a cluster or clump: a bunch of grapes; grass growing in bunches.
b. A group of like items or individuals gathered or placed together: a bunch of keys on a ring; people standing around in bunches.
2. Informal A group of people usually having a common interest or association: My brother and his bunch are basketball fanatics.
3. Informal A considerable number or amount; a lot: a bunch of trouble; a whole bunch of food.
4. A small lump or swelling; a bump.
v. bunched, bunch·ing, bunch·es
v.tr.
1. To gather or form into a cluster: bunched my fingers into a fist.
2. To gather together into a group.
3. To gather (fabric) into folds.
v.intr.
1. To form a cluster or group: runners bunching up at the starting line.
2. To be gathered together in folds, as fabric.
3. To swell; protrude.

[Middle English bonche, probably from Flemish bondje, diminutive of bont, bundle, from Middle Dutch; see bundle.]

bunch′i·ness n.
bunch′y adj.

bunches

(ˈbʌntʃɪz)
pl n
(Hairdressing & Grooming) Brit a hairstyle in which hair is tied into two sections on either side of the head at the back
References in classic literature ?
Brown, soft-eyed children ran out from the quaint stone hovels to offer nosegays, or bunches of oranges still on the bough.
Some of the patches carried with them bunches of grass and small bushes.
His nether garment was a yellow nankeen, closely fitted to the shape, and tied at his bunches of knees by large knots of white ribbon, a good deal sullied by use.
What had been the counter or "bar" of the saloon, gorgeous in white and gold, now sawn in two and divided, was set up on opposite sides of the room as separate dressing-tables, decorated with huge bunches of azaleas, that hid the rough earthenware bowls, and gave each table the appearance of a vestal altar.
This nigger had a good-natured, chuckle-headed face, and his wool was all tied up in little bunches with thread.
It was six blocks long, and in each block two or three brick stores, three stories high, towered above interjected bunches of little frame shops.
A haycart had been decked with green vines and bunches of long-stemmed field daisies, those gay darlings of New England meadows.
And speaking aloud, he continued--"Ladies, you talked of going to Hay Common to visit the gipsy camp; Sam here says that one of the old Mother Bunches is in the servants' hall at this moment, and insists upon being brought in before 'the quality,' to tell them their fortunes.
There were pears and apples, clustered high in blooming pyramids; there were bunches of grapes, made, in the shopkeepers' benevolence to dangle from conspicuous hooks, that people's mouths might water gratis as they passed; there were piles of filberts, mossy and brown, recalling, in their fragrance, ancient walks among the woods, and pleasant shufflings ankle deep through withered leaves; there were Norfolk Biffins, squab and swarthy, setting off the yellow of the oranges and lemons, and, in the great compactness of their juicy persons, urgently entreating and beseeching to be carried home in paper bags and eaten after dinner.
Barkis, but he was not there; and instead of him a fat, short-winded, merry-looking, little old man in black, with rusty little bunches of ribbons at the knees of his breeches, black stockings, and a broad-brimmed hat, came puffing up to the coach window, and said:
It happened one day that I passed a tree under which lay several dry gourds, and catching one up I amused myself with scooping out its contents and pressing into it the juice of several bunches of grapes which hung from every bush.
She was rather burdened with bunches of herbs and two onions in a bag.