bungle


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Related to bungle: bungle up, Bunge

bun·gle

 (bŭng′gəl)
v. bun·gled, bun·gling, bun·gles
v.tr.
To carry out badly or ruin through ineptitude; botch. See Synonyms at botch.
v.intr.
To work or act ineptly or inefficiently.
n.
A clumsy or inept performance; a botch: made a bungle of the case due to inexperience.

[Perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

bun′gler n.
bun′gling·ly adv.

bungle

(ˈbʌŋɡəl)
vb
(tr) to spoil (an operation) through clumsiness, incompetence, etc; botch
n
a clumsy or unsuccessful performance or piece of work; mistake; botch
[C16: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare dialect Swedish bangla to work without results]
ˈbungler n
ˈbungling adj, n
ˈbunglingly adv

bun•gle

(ˈbʌŋ gəl)

v. -gled, -gling,
n. v.t.
1. to do clumsily and awkwardly; botch.
v.i.
2. to perform or work clumsily or inadequately.
n.
3. something done clumsily or inadequately.
[1520–30; of uncertain orig.]
bun′gler, n.
bun′gling•ly, adv.

bungle


Past participle: bungled
Gerund: bungling

Imperative
bungle
bungle
Present
I bungle
you bungle
he/she/it bungles
we bungle
you bungle
they bungle
Preterite
I bungled
you bungled
he/she/it bungled
we bungled
you bungled
they bungled
Present Continuous
I am bungling
you are bungling
he/she/it is bungling
we are bungling
you are bungling
they are bungling
Present Perfect
I have bungled
you have bungled
he/she/it has bungled
we have bungled
you have bungled
they have bungled
Past Continuous
I was bungling
you were bungling
he/she/it was bungling
we were bungling
you were bungling
they were bungling
Past Perfect
I had bungled
you had bungled
he/she/it had bungled
we had bungled
you had bungled
they had bungled
Future
I will bungle
you will bungle
he/she/it will bungle
we will bungle
you will bungle
they will bungle
Future Perfect
I will have bungled
you will have bungled
he/she/it will have bungled
we will have bungled
you will have bungled
they will have bungled
Future Continuous
I will be bungling
you will be bungling
he/she/it will be bungling
we will be bungling
you will be bungling
they will be bungling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bungling
you have been bungling
he/she/it has been bungling
we have been bungling
you have been bungling
they have been bungling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bungling
you will have been bungling
he/she/it will have been bungling
we will have been bungling
you will have been bungling
they will have been bungling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bungling
you had been bungling
he/she/it had been bungling
we had been bungling
you had been bungling
they had been bungling
Conditional
I would bungle
you would bungle
he/she/it would bungle
we would bungle
you would bungle
they would bungle
Past Conditional
I would have bungled
you would have bungled
he/she/it would have bungled
we would have bungled
you would have bungled
they would have bungled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bungle - an embarrassing mistakebungle - an embarrassing mistake    
error, fault, mistake - a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults"
bobble - the momentary juggling of a batted or thrown baseball; "the second baseman made a bobble but still had time to throw the runner out"
snafu - an acronym often used by soldiers in World War II: situation normal all fucked up
spectacle - a blunder that makes you look ridiculous; used in the phrase `make a spectacle of' yourself
bull - a serious and ludicrous blunder; "he made a bad bull of the assignment"
fumble, muff - (sports) dropping the ball
fluff - a blunder (especially an actor's forgetting the lines)
faux pas, gaffe, slip, solecism, gaucherie - a socially awkward or tactless act
howler - a glaring blunder
clanger - a conspicuous mistake whose effects seem to reverberate; "he dropped a clanger"
misstep, trip-up, stumble, trip - an unintentional but embarrassing blunder; "he recited the whole poem without a single trip"; "he arranged his robes to avoid a trip-up later"; "confusion caused his unfortunate misstep"
Verb1.bungle - make a mess of, destroy or ruinbungle - make a mess of, destroy or ruin; "I botched the dinner and we had to eat out"; "the pianist screwed up the difficult passage in the second movement"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"
2.bungle - spoil by behaving clumsily or foolishly; "I bungled it!"
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"

bungle

verb mess up, blow (slang), ruin, spoil, blunder, fudge, screw up (informal), botch, cock up (Brit. slang), fuck up (offensive taboo slang), miscalculate, make a mess of, mismanage, muff, foul up, make a nonsense of (informal), bodge (informal), make a pig's ear of (informal), flub (U.S. slang), louse up (slang) Two prisoners bungled an escape bid last night
achieve, succeed in, fulfil, accomplish, carry off, effect

bungle

verb
1. To proceed or perform in an unsteady, faltering manner:
2. To harm irreparably through inept handling; make a mess:
Informal: bollix up, muck up.
Idiom: make a muck of.
noun
A stupid, clumsy mistake:
Informal: blooper, boner.
Slang: bloomer, goof.
Translations
يَعْمَلُ بِغَيْر إتْقان
zfušovatzpackat
forkludreforplumre
klúîra
prastai dirbti
pavirši strādātsabojāt darbu
spackať

bungle

[ˈbʌŋgl]
A. Nchapuza f
B. VT [+ work] → hacer chapuceramente
to bungle ithacer una chapuza, amolarlo (Mex)
to bungle an opportunitydesperdiciar una oportunidad

bungle

[ˈbʌŋgəl] vtrater, gâcher

bungle

vtverpfuschen, vermasseln (inf); it was a bungled jobdie Sache war vermasselt (inf)or verpfuscht
vi I see you’ve bungled again, Higginswie ich sehe, haben Sie wieder einmal alles verpfuscht or vermasselt (inf), → Higgins

bungle

[ˈbʌŋgl] (fam)
1. vtfare un pasticcio di
2. vifare pasticci

bungle

(ˈbaŋgl) verb
to do (something) clumsily or badly. Someone has bungled.
References in classic literature ?
Bungle away at it then, and bring it to me (turns to go).
In spite of the clearest directions, Miss Bartlett contrived to bungle her arrival.
I am so out of sorts that I bungle at an easy job like this
But you are not to order her around, Bungle, as you do us.
Women were fluttery creatures, and here mere mastery would prove a bungle.
To all appearances it was a bungle, the way the chain tangled and kept the anchor from reaching the bottom.
SO, the waste bin-and-bag bungle is being imposed on us and the boodle is beginning to be made manifest under the menace of "you have broken the God-given (council) rules, consequently you are being financially whacked, so pay up or get pinched.
Of course anyone watching the clips knows that Williams didn't bungle the story.
A MERSEYSIDE entertainer who used to be Bungle on Rainbow failed to make the cut on The Voice - but made judge Ricky Wilson's day.
IT'S one of TV's strangest comebacks the man who used to play Bungle in vintage ITV kids' show Rainbow auditions on The Voice.
Bungle loves his food so we also found this is a great way to bond with him.
Stockton Council's animal welfare officers were alerted and took the dog, which has since been named Bungle, to a vet.