bungle

(redirected from bunglers)
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bun·gle

 (bŭng′gəl)
v. bun·gled, bun·gling, bun·gles
v.tr.
To carry out badly or ruin through ineptitude; botch. See Synonyms at botch.
v.intr.
To work or act ineptly or inefficiently.
n.
A clumsy or inept performance; a botch: made a bungle of the case due to inexperience.

[Perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

bun′gler n.
bun′gling·ly adv.

bungle

(ˈbʌŋɡəl)
vb
(tr) to spoil (an operation) through clumsiness, incompetence, etc; botch
n
a clumsy or unsuccessful performance or piece of work; mistake; botch
[C16: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare dialect Swedish bangla to work without results]
ˈbungler n
ˈbungling adj, n
ˈbunglingly adv

bun•gle

(ˈbʌŋ gəl)

v. -gled, -gling,
n. v.t.
1. to do clumsily and awkwardly; botch.
v.i.
2. to perform or work clumsily or inadequately.
n.
3. something done clumsily or inadequately.
[1520–30; of uncertain orig.]
bun′gler, n.
bun′gling•ly, adv.

bungle


Past participle: bungled
Gerund: bungling

Imperative
bungle
bungle
Present
I bungle
you bungle
he/she/it bungles
we bungle
you bungle
they bungle
Preterite
I bungled
you bungled
he/she/it bungled
we bungled
you bungled
they bungled
Present Continuous
I am bungling
you are bungling
he/she/it is bungling
we are bungling
you are bungling
they are bungling
Present Perfect
I have bungled
you have bungled
he/she/it has bungled
we have bungled
you have bungled
they have bungled
Past Continuous
I was bungling
you were bungling
he/she/it was bungling
we were bungling
you were bungling
they were bungling
Past Perfect
I had bungled
you had bungled
he/she/it had bungled
we had bungled
you had bungled
they had bungled
Future
I will bungle
you will bungle
he/she/it will bungle
we will bungle
you will bungle
they will bungle
Future Perfect
I will have bungled
you will have bungled
he/she/it will have bungled
we will have bungled
you will have bungled
they will have bungled
Future Continuous
I will be bungling
you will be bungling
he/she/it will be bungling
we will be bungling
you will be bungling
they will be bungling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bungling
you have been bungling
he/she/it has been bungling
we have been bungling
you have been bungling
they have been bungling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bungling
you will have been bungling
he/she/it will have been bungling
we will have been bungling
you will have been bungling
they will have been bungling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bungling
you had been bungling
he/she/it had been bungling
we had been bungling
you had been bungling
they had been bungling
Conditional
I would bungle
you would bungle
he/she/it would bungle
we would bungle
you would bungle
they would bungle
Past Conditional
I would have bungled
you would have bungled
he/she/it would have bungled
we would have bungled
you would have bungled
they would have bungled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bungle - an embarrassing mistakebungle - an embarrassing mistake    
error, fault, mistake - a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults"
bobble - the momentary juggling of a batted or thrown baseball; "the second baseman made a bobble but still had time to throw the runner out"
snafu - an acronym often used by soldiers in World War II: situation normal all fucked up
spectacle - a blunder that makes you look ridiculous; used in the phrase `make a spectacle of' yourself
bull - a serious and ludicrous blunder; "he made a bad bull of the assignment"
fumble, muff - (sports) dropping the ball
fluff - a blunder (especially an actor's forgetting the lines)
faux pas, gaffe, slip, solecism, gaucherie - a socially awkward or tactless act
howler - a glaring blunder
clanger - a conspicuous mistake whose effects seem to reverberate; "he dropped a clanger"
misstep, trip-up, stumble, trip - an unintentional but embarrassing blunder; "he recited the whole poem without a single trip"; "he arranged his robes to avoid a trip-up later"; "confusion caused his unfortunate misstep"
Verb1.bungle - make a mess of, destroy or ruinbungle - make a mess of, destroy or ruin; "I botched the dinner and we had to eat out"; "the pianist screwed up the difficult passage in the second movement"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"
2.bungle - spoil by behaving clumsily or foolishly; "I bungled it!"
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"

bungle

verb mess up, blow (slang), ruin, spoil, blunder, fudge, screw up (informal), botch, cock up (Brit. slang), fuck up (offensive taboo slang), miscalculate, make a mess of, mismanage, muff, foul up, make a nonsense of (informal), bodge (informal), make a pig's ear of (informal), flub (U.S. slang), louse up (slang) Two prisoners bungled an escape bid last night
achieve, succeed in, fulfil, accomplish, carry off, effect

bungle

verb
1. To proceed or perform in an unsteady, faltering manner:
2. To harm irreparably through inept handling; make a mess:
Informal: bollix up, muck up.
Idiom: make a muck of.
noun
A stupid, clumsy mistake:
Informal: blooper, boner.
Slang: bloomer, goof.
Translations
يَعْمَلُ بِغَيْر إتْقان
zfušovatzpackat
forkludreforplumre
klúîra
prastai dirbti
pavirši strādātsabojāt darbu
spackať

bungle

[ˈbʌŋgl]
A. Nchapuza f
B. VT [+ work] → hacer chapuceramente
to bungle ithacer una chapuza, amolarlo (Mex)
to bungle an opportunitydesperdiciar una oportunidad

bungle

[ˈbʌŋgəl] vtrater, gâcher

bungle

vtverpfuschen, vermasseln (inf); it was a bungled jobdie Sache war vermasselt (inf)or verpfuscht
vi I see you’ve bungled again, Higginswie ich sehe, haben Sie wieder einmal alles verpfuscht or vermasselt (inf), → Higgins

bungle

[ˈbʌŋgl] (fam)
1. vtfare un pasticcio di
2. vifare pasticci

bungle

(ˈbaŋgl) verb
to do (something) clumsily or badly. Someone has bungled.
References in classic literature ?
Reduced to itself, abandoned by the other arts, because human thought is abandoning it, it summons bunglers in place of artists.
Only a single antagonist could face him at a time upon the narrow stairway, he had the advantage of position and of the defensive, and he was a master of the sword while they were clumsy bunglers by comparison.
I did try, but was presently swept off the stool and denominated "a little bungler.
She had once heard an enthusiastic musician, out of patience with a gifted bungler, declare that a fine voice is really an obstacle to singing properly; and it occurred to her that it might perhaps be equally true that a beautiful face is an obstacle to the acquisition of charming manners.
The Bank fleet pass good seamanship in silence; but a bungler is jeered all along the line.
Am I such a farcical bungler, Watson, that I should erect an obvious dummy, and expect that some of the sharpest men in Europe would be deceived by it.
I had done it with a heavy foot, and by this time was in a rage with both him and myself, but I always was a bungler, and, having adopted this means in a hurry, I could at the time see no other easy way out.
You were a fool and a bungler not to make sure of it.
Lop-Ear, struggling with the second puppy, scowled at me and intimated by a variety of sounds the different kinds of a fool and a bungler that I was.
As the immortal Alexis Soyer can make more delicious soup for a half-penny than an ignorant cook can concoct with pounds of vegetables and meat, so a skilful artist will make a few simple and pleasing phrases go farther than ever so much substantial benefit-stock in the hands of a mere bungler.
Lecoq was a miserable bungler," he said, in an angry voice; "he had only one thing to recommend him, and that was his energy.
But one minute these bunglers were saying it was natural causes then almost a week later it's suddenly murder.