bungling


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bun·gle

 (bŭng′gəl)
v. bun·gled, bun·gling, bun·gles
v.tr.
To carry out badly or ruin through ineptitude; botch. See Synonyms at botch.
v.intr.
To work or act ineptly or inefficiently.
n.
A clumsy or inept performance; a botch: made a bungle of the case due to inexperience.

[Perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

bun′gler n.
bun′gling·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bungling - showing lack of skill or aptitude; "a bungling workman"; "did a clumsy job"; "his fumbling attempt to put up a shelf"
unskilled - not having or showing or requiring special skill or proficiency; "unskilled in the art of rhetoric"; "an enthusiastic but unskillful mountain climber"; "unskilled labor"; "workers in unskilled occupations are finding fewer and fewer job opportunities"; "unskilled workmanship"
2.bungling - lacking physical movement skills, especially with the hands; "a bumbling mechanic"; "a bungling performance"; "ham-handed governmental interference"; "could scarcely empty a scuttle of ashes, so handless was the poor creature"- Mary H. Vorse
maladroit - not adroit; "a maladroit movement of his hand caused the car to swerve"; "a maladroit translation"; "maladroit propaganda"

bungling

adjective incompetent, blundering, awkward, clumsy, inept, botching, cack-handed (informal), maladroit, ham-handed (informal), unskilful, ham-fisted (informal) a bungling burglar
Translations
hálfkák

bungling

[ˈbʌŋglɪŋ] ADJtorpe, desmañado

bungling

[ˈbʌŋgəlɪŋ] adjmaladroit(e)

bungling

adj personunfähig, trottelhaft, dusselig (inf); attemptstümperhaft; some bungling idiot has …irgendein Trottel hat … (inf)
nStümperei f, → Dusseligkeit f (inf)

bungling

[ˈbʌŋglɪŋ]
1. adjimbranato/a
2. nincompetenza
References in classic literature ?
And when ordinary fellows like you and me attempt to cope with their idiosyncrasies the result is bungling.
There was a fair proportion of kindness in Raveloe; but it was often of a beery and bungling sort, and took the shape least allied to the complimentary and hypocritical.
The slow service and the bungling are the natural results of treating the telephone as though it were a road or a fire department; and any nation that rises to a proper conception of the telephone, that dares to put it into competent hands and to strengthen it with enough capital, can secure as alert and brisk a service as heart can wish.
It is true that the enemies of the cardinal said that it was he himself who set these bungling assassins to work, in order to have, if wanted, the right of using reprisals; but we must not believe everything ministers say, nor everything their enemies say.
He who is frequently successful, gains much applause and popularity; but the clumsy thief, who is detected in some bungling attempt, is scoffed at and despised, and sometimes severely punished.
He was evidently doing his utmost, with a kind of jovial tenderness, to make life agreeable to Valentin to the last, and help him as little as possible to miss the Boulevard des Italiens; but what chiefly occupied his mind was the mystery of a bungling brewer's son making so neat a shot.
I have often felt since I have been in Rome that most of our lives would look much uglier and more bungling than the pictures, if they could be put on the wall.
The black had learned his lesson sufficiently well so that the motor was started without bungling and the machine was soon under way across the meadowland.
He was warm, and bungling of speech, and very happy, as he replied to her, and there was dancing in his mind, throughout the telephone conversation, the memory of Browning and of sickly Elizabeth Barrett.
It is inconceivable to us of to-day--the bungling, dilatory processes of justice a generation ago.
Yes,' rejoined the manager, scratching his head with an air of some vexation; 'three is not enough, and it's very bungling and irregular not to have more, but if we can't help it we can't, so there's no use in talking.
But I am so far from desiring to exhibit such pictures to the public, that I would wish to draw a curtain over those that have been lately set forth in certain French novels; very bungling copies of which have been presented us here under the name of translations.