buppie


Also found in: Acronyms.
Related to buppie: yuppie

bup·pie

 (bŭp′ē)
n. Informal
A young black city or suburban resident with a well-paid professional job and an affluent lifestyle.

buppie

(ˈbʌpɪ)
n
(Sociology) informal (sometimes capital) an affluent young Black person
[C20: from B(lack) + (y)uppie]
Translations

buppie

, buppy
References in periodicals archive ?
The jacket copy boasts that Lamar "evokes the ironies of integration and the struggles of the black middle class to succeed in white America," and you fear you're in for a lamentation on the once highly prized Buppie track.
Amiri Baraka is only exaggerating a bit when he calls Lee "the quintessential buppie, almost the spirit of the young, upwardly mobile, Black, petit bourgeois professional" (146).
The Short-Sighted Woman of the title is Victoria, a thirty-something Buppie who, like her counterpart, The Man in The Colored Museum's vingnette "Symbiosis," believes that getting rid of all vestiges of negritude is the key to black progress.
The "Drummin'/Taxi" scene uses the irony of Black Humor to express the common condition of present-day African-Americans: Four Black men of diverse style try to hail a taxi on a New York City street: a B-Boy, a student, a Buppie, and a general carrying Colin Powell's autobiography.
What Would Dylan Do is a new comedy for the BET network and boasts a plethora of well-known names attached to the project including The Bernie Mac Show's Warren Hutcherson, who will be the executive producer with Julian Breece, known for Buppies, as the writer and co-executive producer.
There is a school of Buppies around the Village Voice who speak of the "New Black Culture".
com's third original web series after the highly successful BUPPIES (Tatyana Ali) and SHOP TALK (Malik Yoba).
com has also entered the fray with the launch earlier this month of Buppies, its first original scripted Web drama.
20) Nelson George, Buppies, B-Boys, Baps and Bohos: Notes on Post-Soul Black Culture (New York: Harper, 1992), 6.
She attacks BUPPIES (black urban professionals) as having a white consciousness and, in a radical extension of Dyson's discussion, contends that it is the rap generation that has a fully black consciousness.
Both Ellis and Tate were eagerly trumpeting the arrival of this new aesthetic, and they were followed, chiefly, by Nelson George with his 1992 Buppies, B-boys, Baps and Bohos: Notes on Post-Soul Black Culture (the book that coined the term and that features an introduction less eager and more skeptical than Tate's and Ellis's essays).
The baps, b-boys, bohos, and buppies in whose honor he named one of his books all listen to different kinds of music, wear different clothes, and so on; and though all are black, this means principally that their diverse identities have common roots in a generation of more uniformly black people, and in the soul-era black struggles, both cultural and political to which they owe their freedom.