burdock


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Related to burdock: milk thistle

bur·dock

 (bûr′dŏk′)
n.
Any of several plants of the genus Arctium of the composite family, having edible roots and pink or purplish flower heads surrounded by prickly bracts that form burs.

[bur + dock.]

burdock

(ˈbɜːˌdɒk)
n
(Plants) a coarse weedy Eurasian plant of the genus Arctium, having large heart-shaped leaves, tiny purple flowers surrounded by hooked bristles, and burlike fruits: family Asteraceae (composites). Also called: hardoke
[C16: from bur + dock4]

bur•dock

(ˈbɜr dɒk)

n.
a composite plant of the genus Arctium, esp. A. lappa, a coarse broad-leaved weed bearing prickly heads of burs that stick to clothing.
[1590–1600; bur + dock4]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burdock - any of several erect biennial herbs of temperate Eurasia having stout taproots and producing bursburdock - any of several erect biennial herbs of temperate Eurasia having stout taproots and producing burs
Arctium minus, common burdock, lesser burdock - a plant that is ubiquitous in all but very acid soil; found in most of Europe and North Africa
Arctium lappa, great burdock, greater burdock, cocklebur - burdock having heart-shaped leaves found in open woodland, hedgerows and rough grassland of Europe (except extreme N) and Asia Minor; sometimes cultivated for medicinal and culinary use
subshrub, suffrutex - low-growing woody shrub or perennial with woody base
Translations
lapo
takiainen
bojtorján
brusture

burdock

[ˈbɜːdɒk] N (Bot) → bardana f

burdock

nKlette f

burdock

n (bot) bardana, lampazo (esp. Esp)
References in classic literature ?
Before this ugly edifice, and between it and the wheel-track of the street, was a grass-plot, much overgrown with burdock, pig-weed, apple-pern, and such unsightly vegetation, which evidently found something congenial in the soil that had so early borne the black flower of civilised society, a prison.
Here in soap boxes hidden among the trees were stored all their treasures: wee baskets and plates and cups made of burdock balls, bits of broken china for parties, dolls, soon to be outgrown, but serving well as characters in all sorts of romances enacted there,--deaths, funerals, weddings, christenings.
Running down the long hall, she peeped out at both doors, but saw nothing feathered except a draggle-tailed chicken under a burdock leaf.
The burdock never grows alone, but where there grows one there always grow several: it is a great delight, and all this delightfulness is snails' food.
We are provided with a house from our birth, and the burdock forest is planted for our sakes
Do you not think that there are some of our species at a great distance in the interior of the burdock forest?
And the rain beat on the dock-leaves to make drum-music for their sake, and the sun shone in order to give the burdock forest a color for their sakes; and they were very happy, and the whole family was happy; for they, indeed were so.
Now, there was an old manor-house, where they no longer ate snails, they were quite extinct; but the burdocks were not extinct, they grew and grew all over the walks and all the beds; they could not get the mastery over them--it was a whole forest of burdocks.
Or the burdocks have grown up over it, so that they cannot come out.
In Allan Water, near by where it falls into the Forth, we found a little sandy islet, overgrown with burdock, butterbur and the like low plants, that would just cover us if we lay flat.
On either side extended a ruinous wooden fence of open lattice-work, through which could be seen a grassy yard, and, especially in the angles of the building, an enormous fertility of burdocks, with leaves, it is hardly an exaggeration to say, two or three feet long.
Stubbornly, as though insisting on its rights, the wind stopped Levin, and tearing the leaves and flowers off the lime trees and stripping the white birch branches into strange unseemly nakedness, it twisted everything on one side--acacias, flowers, burdocks, long grass, and tall tree-tops.