bureaucratic


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bu·reau·crat

 (byo͝or′ə-krăt′)
n.
1. An official of a bureaucracy.
2. An official who is rigidly devoted to the details of administrative procedure.

bu′reau·crat′ic adj.
bu′reau·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

bureaucratic

(ˌbjʊərəˈkrætɪk)
adj
of or relating to bureaucrats; characterized by bureaucracy
ˌbureauˈcratically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bureaucratic - of or relating to or resembling a bureaucrat or bureaucracy; "his bureaucratic behavior annoyed his colleagues"; "a bureaucratic nightmare"

bureaucratic

adjective
1. administrative, political, official, ministerial, governmental, red-tape The school is free from bureaucratic control.
2. rigid, complex, strict, stringent, uncompromising, unadaptable The GPs complain that the system has become too bureaucratic.
Translations
بيروقراطي
byrokratický
bureaukratisk
bürokratikus
skrifstofustjórnkerfis-; skrifræîis-
byrokratický

bureaucratic

[ˌbjʊərəʊˈkrætɪk] ADJburocrático

bureaucratic

[ˌbjʊərəˈkrætɪk] adjbureaucratique

bureaucratic

adj, bureaucratically

bureaucratic

[ˌbjʊərəˈkrætɪk] adjburocratico/a

bureaucracy

(bjuˈrokrəsi) noun
1. a system of government by officials working for a government.
2. a country having such a government which uses such officials.
ˌbureauˈcratic adjective
References in classic literature ?
While in the midst of this bureaucratic house- cleaning he met Hubbard, who had just been appointed by President Hayes as the head of a commission on mail transportation.
This bureaucratic decision had something blighting about it; in a few words it contained the whole story.
Formerly, under the monarchy, the bureaucratic armies did not exist.
There is more liberty of action in England, but for liberty of thought go to bureaucratic Prussia.
deposited in his patriotic breast, a display of bureaucratic stoicism in a Russian official's ineradicable, almost sublime contempt for truth; stoicism of silence understood only by the very few of the initiated, and not without a certain cynical grandeur of self-sacrifice on the part of a sybarite.
After five years without a home for the museum, and after much bureaucratic wrangling, work is at last under way for the stunning new facility: a treasure for families throughout the Southland - and the San Fernando Valley's first major cultural attraction.
First he puzzles over the bureaucratic inflexibility and reaction of his own secret world, then the usefulness and ethics of what he is doing, and finally, when the Soviet empire collapses, his own place as a Kazakh, a foreigner, in the new Russian state.
Eva Osterberg, in "Criminality, Social Control, and the Early Modern State: Evidence and Interpretations in Scandanavian Historiography" has some reservations about the "civilizing process;" the changing function of the courts, from forums for the settlement of individual disputes to bureaucratic agencies of social control, is her main focus.
Not because it is particularly virulent or sinister, but because it is just one more irrelevant, useless bureaucratic excrescence that does more for its employees and the industry surrounding it than it does for the world it is meant to serve.
Since the 1970s, there have been numerous attempts to replace or enrich the thin visual fare offered by arid bureaucratic Modernism.
UK) examines the Rwandan genocide and the Western failure to intervene in terms of political and bureaucratic decision-making.
Arnold Schwarzenegger's administration is that his beloved California Performance Review now risks becoming a monument to what it was supposed to counter - bureaucratic inefficiency.