burgher


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burgh·er

 (bûr′gər)
n.
1. A citizen of a town or borough.
2. A comfortable or complacent member of the middle class.
3.
a. A member of the mercantile class of a medieval European city.
b. A citizen of a medieval European city.

[German Bürger or Dutch burger, both from Middle High German burgaere, from Old High German burgārī, from burg, city; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

burgher

(ˈbɜːɡə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the trading or mercantile class of a medieval city
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a respectable citizen; bourgeois
3. (Historical Terms) archaic a citizen or inhabitant of a corporate town, esp on the Continent
4. (Historical Terms) history
a. a citizen of the Cape Colony or of one of the Transvaal and Free State republics
b. (as modifier): burgher troops.
[C16: from German Bürger, or Dutch burger freeman of a borough]

burgh•er

(ˈbɜr gər)

n.
an inhabitant of a town or borough, esp. a well-to-do member of the middle class.
[1560–70; < Middle Dutch < Middle High German burger=burg borough + -er -er1]
burgh′er•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burgher - a citizen of an English borough
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
2.burgher - a member of the middle class
bourgeoisie, middle class - the social class between the lower and upper classes
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
petit bourgeois - a member of the lower middle class
Translations

burgher

[ˈbɜːgəʳ] N (archaic or liter) (= bourgeois) → burgués/esa m/f; (= citizen) → ciudadano/a m/f

burgher

[ˈbɜːrr] n (old-fashioned)citoyen(ne) m/f

burgher

n (old)Bürger(in) m(f)

burgher

[ˈbɜːgəʳ] ncittadino/a
References in classic literature ?
The old knights were so proud of these names that if a burgher called them by their right ones they would correct them.
As when a prowling Wolfe, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt for prey, Watching where Shepherds pen thir Flocks at eeve In hurdl'd Cotes amid the field secure, Leaps o're the fence with ease into the Fould: Or as a Thief bent to unhoord the cash Of some rich Burgher, whose substantial dores, Cross-barrd and bolted fast, fear no assault, In at the window climbes, or o're the tiles; So clomb this first grand Thief into Gods Fould: So since into his Church lewd Hirelings climbe.
Tourists in Normandy, Brittany, Maine, and Anjou must all have seen in the capitals of those provinces many houses which resemble more or less that of the Cormons; for it is, in its way, an archetype of the burgher houses in that region of France, and it deserves a place in this history because it serves to explain manners and customs, and represents ideas.
To speak plainly, the fellow had, in spite of his grinning, an audacious and sinister kind of face; and as he curvetted right into the village, the old stumpy appearance of his pumps excited no little suspicion; and many a burgher who beheld him that day would have given a trifle for a peep beneath the white cambric handkerchief which hung so obtrusively from the pocket of his swallow-tailed coat.
Now he met a fair buxom lass in a shady lane, and each gave the other a merry word and passed their way; now he saw a fair lady upon an ambling pad, to whom he doffed his cap, and who bowed sedately in return to the fair youth; now he saw a fat monk on a pannier-laden ass; now a gallant knight, with spear and shield and armor that flashed brightly in the sunlight; now a page clad in crimson; and now a stout burgher from good Nottingham Town, pacing along with serious footsteps; all these sights he saw, but adventure found he none.
Rostopchin's broadsheets, headed by woodcuts of a drink shop, a potman, and a Moscow burgher called Karpushka Chigirin, "who- having been a militiaman and having had rather too much at the pub- heard that Napoleon wished to come to Moscow, grew angry, abused the French in very bad language, came out of the drink shop, and, under the sign of the eagle, began to address the assembled people," were read and discussed, together with the latest of Vasili Lvovich Pushkin's bouts rimes.
This troop, the only defence of the prison, overawed by its firm attitude not only the disorderly riotous mass of the populace, but also the detachment of the burgher guard, which, being placed opposite the Buytenhof to support the soldiers in keeping order, gave to the rioters the example of seditious cries, shouting, --
lay hand on his wool-bales, or trifle with his velvet of Bruges, and out buzzes every stout burgher, like bees from the tee-hole, ready to lay on as though it were his one business in life.
Gayer sallies, more merry mirth, better jokes, and brighter repartees, you never heard over your mahogany, than you will hear over the half-inch white cedar of the whale-boat, when thus hung in hangman's nooses; and, like the six burghers of Calais before King Edward, the six men composing the crew pull into the jaws of death, with a halter around every neck, as you may say.
They were the voices of old burghers that I heard in the streets.
The lower and interior space was soon filled by substantial yeomen and burghers, and such of the lesser gentry, as, from modesty, poverty, or dubious title, durst not assume any higher place.
From the serfs of the Middle Ages sprang the chartered burghers of the earliest towns.