burglar


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Related to burglar: burglar alarm

bur·glar

 (bûr′glər)
n.
One who commits burglary.

[Anglo-Norman burgler (alteration of burgesur, probably from Old French burg, borough) and Medieval Latin burgulātor (alteration of burgātor, from burgāre, to commit burglary in, from Late Latin burgus, fortified town), both of Germanic origin; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

burglar

(ˈbɜːɡlə)
n
(Professions) a person who commits burglary; housebreaker
[C15: from Anglo-French burgler, from Medieval Latin burglātor, probably from burgāre to thieve, from Latin burgus castle, fortress, of Germanic origin]

bur•glar

(ˈbɜr glər)

n.
a person who commits burglary.
[1535–45; < Anglo-French burgler (compare Anglo-Latin burg(u)lātor), of obscure orig.; see -ar2]

thief

robberburglar

Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A robber often uses violence or the threat of violence to steal things from places such as banks or shops.

They caught the armed robber who raided a supermarket.

A burglar breaks into houses or other buildings and steals things.

The average burglar spends just two minutes inside your house.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to stealburglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to steal
cat burglar, housebreaker - a burglar who unlawfully breaks into and enters another person's house
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it

burglar

noun housebreaker, thief, robber, pilferer, filcher, cat burglar, sneak thief, picklock burglars broke into their home

burglar

noun
Translations
لَصّ الـمَنازِللِصُّ المنازِلِ لَيْلا
lupič
indbrudstyvtyv
murtovaras
provalnik
innbrotsòjófur
不法侵入者
강도
įsilaužėlisįsilaužimassignalizacija
kramplauzis
vlomilec
inbrottstjuv
ขโมย
ev soyan hırsızhırsız
kẻ trộm

burglar

[ˈbɜːgləʳ]
A. Nladrón/ona m/f
B. CPD burglar alarm Nalarma f antirrobo

burglar

[ˈbɜːrglər] ncambrioleur/euse m/fburglar alarm n(système m d') alarme f

burglar

nEinbrecher(in) m(f)

burglar

[ˈbɜːgləʳ] nladro/a, scassinatore/trice

burglar

(ˈbəːglə) noun
a person who enters a house etc illegally to steal. The burglar stole her jewellery.
ˈburglar alarm noun
an alarm against burglaries.
ˈburglaryplural ˈburglaries noun
(an act of) illegally entering a house etc to steal. He has been charged with burglary.
ˈburgle verb
Our house has been burgled.

burglar

لَصّ الـمَنازِل lupič tyv Einbrecher διαρρήκτης ladrón murtovaras cambrioleur provalnik scassinatore 不法侵入者 강도 inbreker innbruddstyv włamywacz assaltante взломщик inbrottstjuv ขโมย hırsız kẻ trộm 夜贼
References in classic literature ?
What can you expect, when you take one's breath away, creeping in like a burglar, and letting cats out of bags like that?
most contemptible and worthy of all scorn; with slouched hat and guilty eye, skulking from his God; prowling among the shipping like a vile burglar hastening to cross the seas.
But one night, under cover of darkness, and further concealed in a most cunning disguisement, a desperate burglar slid into his happy home, and robbed them all of everything.
Then he had another ride in the patrol wagon, along with the drunken wife-beater and the maniac, several "plain drunks" and "saloon fighters," a burglar, and two men who had been arrested for stealing meat from the packing houses.
Well, I have been waiting for you long, and listening: yet not one movement have I heard, nor one sob: five minutes more of that death-like hush, and I should have forced the lock like a burglar.
Perhaps he is a burglar, come down to steal the college plate.
The thought flashed across me that I might have before me a burglar or cut-throat, some monstrous Irregular Isosceles, who, by feigning the voice of a Circle, had obtained admission somehow into the house, and was now preparing to stab me with his acute angle.
In the far corner of the room something moved--moved with a silent stealthiness which transcended even the trained silence of the burglar.
I have read of a gentleman who owned a so fine house in London, and when he went for months of summer to Switzerland and lock up his house, some burglar come and broke window at back and got in.
Vidocq = Francois Vidocq (1775-1857), a senior French police official who was secretly a burglar, and who "investigated" his own crimes for a long time before being exposed}
This was no common thief that turned over letters, bills, and saddles - no mere burglar who ran a little knife sideways into the soles of Mahbub's slippers, or picked the seams of the saddle-bags so deftly.
Muldoon's broomstick, in a corner, to tempt the burglar.