burglary


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bur·gla·ry

 (bûr′glə-rē)
n. pl. bur·gla·ries
1. The act of entering another's premises without authorization in order to commit a crime, such as theft.
2. An instance of this: There were 10 burglaries in the area last month.

burglary

(ˈbɜːɡlərɪ)
n, pl -ries
(Law) English criminal law the crime of either entering a building as a trespasser with the intention of committing theft, rape, grievous bodily harm, or damage, or, having entered as a trespasser, of committing one or more of these offences
burglarious adj
burˈglariously adv

bur•gla•ry

(ˈbɜr glə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
the felony of breaking into and entering the house, office, etc., of another with intent to steal.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Anglo-French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable propertyburglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
break-in, breaking and entering, housebreaking - trespassing for an unlawful purpose; illegal entrance into premises with criminal intent

burglary

noun breaking and entering, housebreaking, break-in He's been arrested for burglary.

burglary

noun
The act of entering a building or room with the intent to commit theft:
Translations
vloupáníloupež
indbrudindbrudstyveri
murtomurtovarkaus
provala
innbrot
住居侵入罪
강도죄
vlom
inbrott
การบุกเข้ามาขโมยของในอาคารหรือบ้าน
hırsızlıkev soyma
trộm cắp

burglary

[ˈbɜːglərɪ] Nrobo m (en una casa) (Jur) → allanamiento m de morada

burglary

[ˈbɜːrgləri] ncambriolage m
to commit a burglary → commettre un cambriolage

burglary

nEinbruch m; (= offence)(Einbruchs)diebstahl m

burglary

[ˈbɜːglərɪ] nfurto (con scasso)

burglar

(ˈbəːglə) noun
a person who enters a house etc illegally to steal. The burglar stole her jewellery.
ˈburglar alarm noun
an alarm against burglaries.
ˈburglaryplural ˈburglaries noun
(an act of) illegally entering a house etc to steal. He has been charged with burglary.
ˈburgle verb
Our house has been burgled.

burglary

سَطْو vloupání indbrudstyveri Einbruch διάρρηξη robo con allanamiento murtovarkaus cambriolage provala furto 住居侵入罪 강도죄 inbraak innbrudd włamanie assalto кража со взломом inbrott การบุกเข้ามาขโมยของในอาคารหรือบ้าน hırsızlık trộm cắp 行窃
References in classic literature ?
stealing cattle and such things ain't rob- bery; it's burglary," says Tom Sawyer.
You young jade, you've committed burglary -- that's what you've done.
Not that the idea of being robbed presented itself often or strongly to his mind: hoarding was common in country districts in those days; there were old labourers in the parish of Raveloe who were known to have their savings by them, probably inside their flock-beds; but their rustic neighbours, though not all of them as honest as their ancestors in the days of King Alfred, had not imaginations bold enough to lay a plan of burglary.
Murder, burglary, intemperance, or the minor vices you could have borne; but deceit you cannot abide.
he thought, and he was moved as by a slight, and began at once to recollect that he was here an interloper, in a strange house, which he had entered almost by a burglary, and where at any moment he might be scandalously challenged.
It will be a mighty different thing to commit burglary in Piccadilly, either by day or night.
Well, it seems to me that it is just possible that the arrival of this poor fellow William was not before, but after, the entrance of the burglary into the house.
He threw the cruet in the dustbin-- where I found it, along with other silver--for the sake of a burglary blind.
An audacious burglary and dastardly assault have been committed on the premises of the City and Suburban Bank in Sloane Street, W.
The expedition sent to Jerusalem to seize it got into trouble and could not accomplish the burglary, and so the centre of the mausoleum is vacant now.
But then, when the man commits burglary in order to break images which are not his own, that brings it away from the doctor and on to the policeman.
Such a domiciliary invasion may be called, not only (as they say in police reports) an attack on privacy, but a burglary, a robbery of all that is most precious, namely, CREDIT.