buried


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bur·y

 (bĕr′ē)
tr.v. bur·ied, bur·y·ing, bur·ies
1.
a. To place (a corpse) in a grave, a tomb, or the sea; inter.
b. To dispose of (a corpse) ritualistically by means other than interment or cremation.
2.
a. To place in the ground; cover with earth: The dog buried the bone. The oil was buried deep under the tundra.
b. To place so as to conceal; hide or obscure: buried her face in the pillow; buried the secret deep within himself.
3. To occupy (oneself) with deep concentration; absorb: buried myself in my studies.
4. To put an end to; abandon: buried their quarrel and shook hands.
5. Slang To outdo or defeat by a large margin: The team was buried in the first half by its crosstown rivals.
Idiom:
bury the hatchet
To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.

[Middle English burien, from Old English byrgan; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bur′i·er n.
Word History: Why does bury rhyme with berry and not with jury? The answer goes back to early English times. The late Old English form of the verb bury was byrgan, pronounced approximately (bür′yən). During Middle English times this (ü) sound changed, but with different results in different regions of England: to (o͝o) as in put in the Midlands, to (ĭ) as in pit in southern England, or to (ĕ) as in pet in southeast England. London was located in the East Midlands dialect zone, but because of its status as the capital, its East Midlands dialect was influenced by southern (Saxon) and southeastern (Kentish) dialects. The normal East Midlands development of (ü) was (o͝o), spelled u. Because scribes from the East Midlands pronounced the word with this vowel they tended to spell the word with a u, and this spelling became standard when spellings were fixed after the introduction of printing. The word's pronunciation, however, is southeastern. Bury is the only word in Modern English with a Midlands spelling and a southeastern pronunciation. Similarly, the word busy, from Old English bysig, bisig, and its verb bysgian, bisgian, "to employ," is spelled with the East Midlands dialect u, but pronounced with the southern (Saxon) development of (ü), (ĭ).

Bur·y

 (bĕr′ē)
A borough of northwest England north-northwest of Manchester.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.buried - placed in a grave; "the hastily buried corpses"
unburied - not buried

buried

adjective
2. hidden, concealed, covered buried treasure

buried

adjective
Lying beyond what is obvious or avowed:
Idiom: under cover.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He bade him hold his tongue, and the Distressed One went on to say: "At length, after much questioning and answering, as the princess held to her story, without changing or varying her previous declaration, the Vicar gave his decision in favour of Don Clavijo, and she was delivered over to him as his lawful wife; which the Queen Dona Maguncia, the Princess Antonomasia's mother, so took to heart, that within the space of three days we buried her.
No more can I look into the depths of this unfathomable water, wherein, as momentary lights glanced into it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged.
My boys, there is a great treasure buried in the vineyard.
Bushy and grandmother were sure that a man who had killed himself could not be buried in a Catholic graveyard.
Only that one I bury; the rest were buried before they died; you sail upon their tomb.
And did Sam never find out what was buried by the red-caps?
With deep reverence and solemnity the bodies of the late Lord and Lady Greystoke were buried beside their little African cabin, and between them was placed the tiny skeleton of the baby of Kala, the ape.
Tarzan seemed little interested, after Werper had assured him that that which they buried was not good to eat; but Werper was intensely interested.
And it is supposed to be in a buried city named Kurzon, somewhere in the Sierra de Merendon range of mountains, in the vicinity of the Copan valley.
The Amazon Penthesileia, the daughter of Ares and of Thracian race, comes to aid the Trojans, and after showing great prowess, is killed by Achilles and buried by the Trojans.
He now dug into the poor clergyman's heart, like a miner searching for gold; or, rather, like a sexton delving into a grave, possibly in quest of a jewel that had been buried on the dead man's bosom, but likely to find nothing save mortality and corruption.
We had to go to our work, but Paddy was not to be buried in any such off-hand fashion as that.