buried


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bur·y

 (bĕr′ē)
tr.v. bur·ied, bur·y·ing, bur·ies
1.
a. To place (a corpse) in a grave, a tomb, or the sea; inter.
b. To dispose of (a corpse) ritualistically by means other than interment or cremation.
2.
a. To place in the ground; cover with earth: The dog buried the bone. The oil was buried deep under the tundra.
b. To place so as to conceal; hide or obscure: buried her face in the pillow; buried the secret deep within himself.
3. To occupy (oneself) with deep concentration; absorb: buried myself in my studies.
4. To put an end to; abandon: buried their quarrel and shook hands.
5. Slang To outdo or defeat by a large margin: The team was buried in the first half by its crosstown rivals.
Idiom:
bury the hatchet
To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.

[Middle English burien, from Old English byrgan; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bur′i·er n.
Word History: Why does bury rhyme with berry and not with jury? The answer goes back to early English times. The late Old English form of the verb bury was byrgan, pronounced approximately (bür′yən). During Middle English times this (ü) sound changed, but with different results in different regions of England: to (o͝o) as in put in the Midlands, to (ĭ) as in pit in southern England, or to (ĕ) as in pet in southeast England. London is located in the East Midlands, but because of its central location and its status as the capital, its East Midlands dialect was influenced by southern (Saxon) and southeastern (Kentish) dialects. The normal East Midlands development of (ü) was (o͝o), spelled u. Because scribes from the East Midlands pronounced the word with this vowel they tended to spell the word with a u, and this spelling became standard when spellings were fixed after the introduction of printing. The word's pronunciation, however, is southeastern. Bury is the only word in Modern English with a Midlands spelling and a southeastern pronunciation. Similarly, the word busy, from Old English bysig, bisig, and its verb bysgian, bisgian, "to employ," is spelled with the East Midlands dialect u, but pronounced with the southern (Saxon) development of (ü), (ĭ).

Bur·y

 (bĕr′ē)
A borough of northwest England north-northwest of Manchester.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.buried - placed in a grave; "the hastily buried corpses"
unburied - not buried

buried

adjective
2. hidden, concealed, covered buried treasure

buried

adjective
Lying beyond what is obvious or avowed:
Idiom: under cover.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It caught in the window, the tower tottered, leaned forward, fell with a crash, and buried the unhappy lovers in the ruins.
When she got into bed she buried her face in the pillow and wept brokenheartedly.
We'll get lost in buried cities, ride down raging torrents on a raft, fall over a cliff maybe and be rescued.
We were talking about what it is like to spend one's childhood in little towns like these, buried in wheat and corn, under stimulating extremes of climate: burning summers when the world lies green and billowy beneath a brilliant sky, when one is fairly stifled in vegetation, in the color and smell of strong weeds and heavy harvests; blustery winters with little snow, when the whole country is stripped bare and gray as sheet-iron.
She buried her face in his neck, and said good-by again.
They came in a large canoe, when my fathers had buried the tomahawk with the red men around them.
It was so feeble and inconsistent a culmination to the beautiful scenery they had passed through, so hopeless and imbecile a conclusion to the preparation of that long picturesque journey, with its glimpses of sylvan and pastoral glades and canyons, that, as the coach swept down the last incline, and the remorseless monotony of the dead level spread out before them, furrowed by ditches and indented by pits, under cover of shielding their cheeks from the impalpable dust that rose beneath the plunging wheels, they buried their faces in their handkerchiefs, to hide a few half-hysterical tears.
His home would include the home of the dead and buried wizard, and would thus afford the ghost of the latter a kind of privilege to haunt its new apartments, and the chambers into which future bridegrooms were to lead their brides, and where children of the Pyncheon blood were to be born.
He now dug into the poor clergyman's heart, like a miner searching for gold; or, rather, like a sexton delving into a grave, possibly in quest of a jewel that had been buried on the dead man's bosom, but likely to find nothing save mortality and corruption.
Only that one I bury; the rest were buried before they died; you sail upon their tomb.
As the sun began to sink into the west they took their way homeward athwart the long shadows of the trees and soon were buried from sight in the forests of Cardiff Hill.
No more can I look into the depths of this unfathomable water, wherein, as momentary lights glanced into it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged.