burst

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burst

 (bûrst)
v. burst, burst·ing, bursts
v.intr.
1.
a. To come open or fly apart suddenly or violently, especially from internal pressure.
b. To explode.
2. To be or seem to be full to the point of breaking open: The sacks were bursting with grain.
3. To emerge, come forth, or arrive suddenly: burst out of the door.
4. To come apart or seem to come apart because of overwhelming emotion: thought his heart would burst with happiness.
5. To give sudden utterance or expression: burst out laughing; burst into tears.
v.tr.
1. To cause to burst: burst the balloon. See Synonyms at break.
2. To exert strong pressure in order to force (something) open.
3. To separate (a continuous form or printout) into individual sheets.
n.
1. A sudden outbreak or outburst; an explosion.
2. The result of bursting, especially the explosion of a projectile or bomb on impact or in the air.
3.
a. The number of bullets fired from an automatic weapon by one pull of the trigger.
b. A volley of bullets fired from an automatic weapon: The machine gunner fired a quick burst.
4. An abrupt, intense increase; a rush: a burst of speed; fitful bursts of wind.
5. A period of intense activity: "I write in very short bursts—10 or 15 minutes" (Zoe Heller).

[Middle English bursten, from Old English berstan.]

burst

(bɜːst)
vb, bursts, bursting or burst
1. to break or cause to break open or apart suddenly and noisily, esp from internal pressure; explode
2. (intr) to come, go, etc, suddenly and forcibly: he burst into the room.
3. (intr) to be full to the point of breaking open
4. (intr) to give vent (to) suddenly or loudly: to burst into song.
5. (Pathology) to cause or suffer the rupture of: to burst a blood vessel.
n
6. a sudden breaking open or apart; explosion
7. a break; breach; rupture
8. a sudden display or increase of effort or action; spurt: a burst of speed.
9. a sudden and violent emission, occurrence, or outbreak: a burst of heavy rain; a burst of applause.
10. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a volley of fire from a weapon or weapons
adj
broken apart; ruptured: a burst pipe.
[Old English berstan; related to Old Norse bresta, Old Frisian bersta, Old High German brestan; compare break]
ˈburster n

burst

(bɜrst)

v. burst, often, burst•ed, burst•ing, v.i.
1. to break, break open, or fly apart with sudden violence.
2. to issue forth suddenly and forcibly.
3. to give sudden expression to or as if to emotion: to burst into tears.
4. to be extremely full, as if ready to break open: a room bursting with people.
5. to appear suddenly: The sun burst through the clouds.
v.t.
6. to cause to break suddenly and violently.
7. to cause or suffer the rupture of: to burst a blood vessel.
8. to separate (the sheets of a multipart copy).
n.
9. an act or instance of bursting.
10. a sudden, intense display, as of energy or effort: a burst of speed.
11. a sudden expression or manifestation, as of emotion: a burst of affection.
12.
a. the explosion of a projectile, esp. in a specified place: an air burst.
b. a rapid sequence of shots: a machine gun burst.
13. breach; gap: to plug a burst in the dike.
Idioms:
burst at the seams, to be filled beyond normal capacity.
[before 1000; Middle English bersten,bursten, Old English berstan]
burst′er, n.
usage: See bust2.

Burst

 a vehement outburst.
Examples: burst of applause; of gratitude, 1775; of ill humour, 1838; of laughter, 1838; of merriment, 1751; of passion; of sunlight, 1854; of thunder, 1671.

Burst

 

See Also: DISINTEGRATION, SUDDENNESS

  1. (Your unexpected letter has just) burst into my existence like a meteor into the sphere of a planet —William James letter from Dresden to Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., May 15, 1868
  2. (My poor head would) burst like a dropped watermelon —Maya Angelou
  3. Burst like a raw egg —William Diehl
  4. Burst like a ripe seedpod —Beryl Markham
  5. Burst like a thunderbolt —Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  6. (Seeds) burst like bullets —Anne Sexton
  7. [Details of an event would] burst open like garbage from a bag dropped from a height —Thomas Keneally
  8. Burst out like a rash —Nadine Gordimer
  9. Bursting like an overdone potato —Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  10. Comes apart like a slow-ripping seam —Sharon Sheehe Stark

    The character coming apart in the author’s story, In the Surprise of Life, is a girl who has been trying to contain her laughter.

  11. Flashed [a remark] like a sheet of heat lightning —Rita Mae Brown
  12. (The cursing and grumbling) flashed like a storm —Enid Bagnold
  13. Like the buds let us burst —Ogden Nash
  14. (He had a real gift for those flaring exclamations, those raucous) outbursts, like wounds suddenly opened —Romain Gary
  15. Sputtering like a leaky valve —John Peter Toohey
  16. (Our imaginations seem to have been) torn open … as by a charge of dynamite —Dorothy Canfield Fisher

burst

When something bursts or when you burst it, it suddenly splits open, and air or some other substance comes out. The past tense and past participle of burst is burst, not 'bursted'.

As he braked, a tyre burst.

If you burst into tears, you suddenly begin to cry.

When the news was broken to Meehan he burst into tears.

Be Careful!
Don't say that someone 'bursts in tears'.

Be Careful!
Do not confuse burst with bust. If you bust something, you break or damage it so badly that it cannot be used.

See bust

burst


Past participle: burst
Gerund: bursting

Imperative
burst
burst
Present
I burst
you burst
he/she/it bursts
we burst
you burst
they burst
Preterite
I burst
you burst
he/she/it burst
we burst
you burst
they burst
Present Continuous
I am bursting
you are bursting
he/she/it is bursting
we are bursting
you are bursting
they are bursting
Present Perfect
I have burst
you have burst
he/she/it has burst
we have burst
you have burst
they have burst
Past Continuous
I was bursting
you were bursting
he/she/it was bursting
we were bursting
you were bursting
they were bursting
Past Perfect
I had burst
you had burst
he/she/it had burst
we had burst
you had burst
they had burst
Future
I will burst
you will burst
he/she/it will burst
we will burst
you will burst
they will burst
Future Perfect
I will have burst
you will have burst
he/she/it will have burst
we will have burst
you will have burst
they will have burst
Future Continuous
I will be bursting
you will be bursting
he/she/it will be bursting
we will be bursting
you will be bursting
they will be bursting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bursting
you have been bursting
he/she/it has been bursting
we have been bursting
you have been bursting
they have been bursting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bursting
you will have been bursting
he/she/it will have been bursting
we will have been bursting
you will have been bursting
they will have been bursting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bursting
you had been bursting
he/she/it had been bursting
we had been bursting
you had been bursting
they had been bursting
Conditional
I would burst
you would burst
he/she/it would burst
we would burst
you would burst
they would burst
Past Conditional
I would have burst
you would have burst
he/she/it would have burst
we would have burst
you would have burst
they would have burst
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burst - the act of exploding or burstingburst - the act of exploding or bursting; "the explosion of the firecrackers awoke the children"; "the burst of an atom bomb creates enormous radiation aloft"
change of integrity - the act of changing the unity or wholeness of something
detonation - the act of detonating an explosive
fulmination - the act of exploding with noise and violence; "his fulminations frightened the horses"
2.burst - rapid simultaneous discharge of firearmsburst - rapid simultaneous discharge of firearms; "our fusillade from the left flank caught them by surprise"
firing, fire - the act of firing weapons or artillery at an enemy; "hold your fire until you can see the whites of their eyes"; "they retreated in the face of withering enemy fire"
3.burst - a sudden flurry of activity (often for no obvious reason); "a burst of applause"; "a fit of housecleaning"
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
fits and starts - repeated bursts of activity; "they worked in fits and starts"
4.burst - a sudden intense happening; "an outburst of heavy rain"; "a burst of lightning"
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
salvo - an outburst resembling the discharge of firearms or the release of bombs
rush - a sudden burst of activity; "come back after the rush"
Verb1.burst - come open suddenly and violently, as if from internal pressure; "The bubble burst"
pop - burst open with a sharp, explosive sound; "The balloon popped"; "This popcorn pops quickly in the microwave oven"
blow - burst suddenly; "The tire blew"; "We blew a tire"
stave, stave in - burst or force (a hole) into something
come apart, break, split up, fall apart, separate - become separated into pieces or fragments; "The figurine broke"; "The freshly baked loaf fell apart"
2.burst - force out or release suddenly and often violently something pent up; "break into tears"; "erupt in anger"
express emotion, express feelings - give verbal or other expression to one's feelings
3.burst - burst outward, usually with noiseburst - burst outward, usually with noise; "The champagne bottle exploded"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
crump - explode heavily or with a loud dull noise
go off - be discharged or activated; "the explosive devices went off"
belch, extravasate, erupt - become active and spew forth lava and rocks; "Vesuvius erupts once in a while"
4.burst - move suddenly, energetically, or violently; "He burst out of the house into the cool night"
bound, jump, leap, spring - move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
5.burst - be in a state of movement or actionburst - be in a state of movement or action; "The room abounded with screaming children"; "The garden bristled with toddlers"
feature, have - have as a feature; "This restaurant features the most famous chefs in France"
6.burst - emerge suddenly; "The sun burst into view"
emerge - come out into view, as from concealment; "Suddenly, the proprietor emerged from his office"
7.burst - cause to burst; "The ice broke the pipe"
pop - cause to burst with a loud, explosive sound; "The child popped the balloon"
cave in, collapse, fall in, give way, founder, give, break - break down, literally or metaphorically; "The wall collapsed"; "The business collapsed"; "The dam broke"; "The roof collapsed"; "The wall gave in"; "The roof finally gave under the weight of the ice"
8.burst - break open or apart suddenly and forcefully; "The dam burst"
shatter - break into many pieces; "The wine glass shattered"
come apart, break, split up, fall apart, separate - become separated into pieces or fragments; "The figurine broke"; "The freshly baked loaf fell apart"

burst

verb
1. explode, blow up, break, split, crack, shatter, fragment, shiver, disintegrate, puncture, rupture, rend asunder The driver lost control when a tyre burst. She burst the balloon with a pin.
2. rush, run, break, pour, jet, surge, spill, break out, erupt, cascade, spout, gush forth Water burst through the dam and flooded their villages.
3. barge, charge, rush, tear, plunge, dash, shove, hurtle Gunmen burst into his home and opened fire.
4. explode, go off, blow up, detonate, go bang (informal) Every now and then you hear some bombs bursting.
noun
1. rush, surge, fit, outbreak, outburst, spate, gush, torrent, eruption, spurt, outpouring short bursts of activity
2. explosion, crack, blast, blasting, bang, discharge a burst of machine-gun fire
adjective
1. ruptured, flat, punctured, split, rent a burst tyre
burst into tears break down in tears, suddenly start crying She burst into tears and ran from the kitchen.
burst out
1. exclaim, cry, call, declare, shout, proclaim, yell, utter, call out, cry out, ejaculate, vociferate 'I want to be just like you,' she burst out.
2. begin, start, happen, appear, emerge, occur, arise, set in, commence, spring up Then war burst out.

burst

verb
1. To come open or fly apart suddenly and violently, as from internal pressure:
blow (out), explode, pop.
Slang: bust.
2. To release or cause to release energy suddenly and violently, especially with a loud noise:
3. To become manifest suddenly and in full force.Forth or out:
phrasal verb
burst out
To speak suddenly or sharply, as from surprise or emotion:
blurt (out), cry (out), ejaculate, exclaim, rap out.
noun
1. A violent release of confined energy, usually accompanied by a loud sound and shock waves:
2. A sudden violent expression, as of emotion:
3. A concentrated outpouring, as of missiles, words, or blows:
Translations
إنْفِجارإنْفِجارٌ بِيَطْفَحُ، يَفيضُيَنْدَفِعُ إلى الغُرفَه، يَقْتَحِميَنْفَجِر
prasknoutpropuknout vprotrhnout seroztrhnout sesalva
udbrudbrase indbriste i grådgå over sine bredderrevne
haljetahalkaistapuhjetapuhkaistapuhkeaminen
puknuti
szétrobbanás
bresta, brotna, rifna, springarjúfa, sprengjaryîjast inn ; fara allt í einu aîsprengingútbrot, kast, kviîa
破裂する
폭발하다
įlėktiišsilieti perprasiveržtiprotrūkissprogti
aplausu vētraeksplodēteksplozijaiedrāztiesizplūst
pretrhnúť
bruhnitiizbruhizbruhnitipočitirazpočiti se
spricka
ระเบิด
patlamakpatlatmaktaşmakbirden bire başlamakcoşma

burst

[bɜːst] (burst (vb: pt, pp))
A. N
1. (in pipe) → reventón m
2. [of shell etc] → estallido m, explosión f; [of shots] → ráfaga f
a burst of activityun arranque repentino de actividad
in a burst of angeren un arranque de cólera
a burst of applauseuna salva de aplausos
a burst of laughteruna carcajada
he put on a burst of speedaceleró bruscamente
B. ADJ a burst blood vesselun derrame
a burst pipeuna tubería reventada
a burst tyreun neumático reventado, una llanta pinchada (LAm)
C. VT [+ pipe, balloon, bag, tyre, bubble] → reventar; [+ banks, dam] → romper
the river has burst its banksel río se ha desbordado
to burst open a doorabrir una puerta de golpe
D. VI [balloon, tyre, boil, boiler, bubble, pipe] → reventar(se); [dam] → romperse; [shell, firework] → explotar, estallar; [storm] → desatarse, desencadenarse (fig) [heart] → partirse
bursting at the seamslleno a reventar
I'm bursting for the loo (Brit) → estoy que reviento, tengo que ir al wáter
the door burst openla puerta se abrió de golpe
I was bursting to tell youreventaba de ganas de decírtelo
to be bursting with prideno caber dentro de sí de orgullo
he was bursting with impatiencereventaba de impaciencia
London is bursting with young peopleLondres está que bulle de juventud
burst forth VI + ADV [plants, buds] → brotar; [water] → salir a chorro; [sun] → aparecer de repente; [anger, violence] → estallar
burst in VI + ADVentrar violentamente
he burst in on the meetingirrumpió en la reunión
burst into VI + PREP
1. to burst into a roomirrumpir en un cuarto
2. to burst into flamesestallar en llamas
to burst into songromper or ponerse a cantar
to burst into tearsecharse a llorar
burst out VI + ADV
1. to burst out of a roomsalir repentinamente de un cuarto
to be bursting out of a dressno caber en un vestido
2. to burst out laughingecharse a reir
to burst out singingromper or ponerse a cantar
"no!" he burst out-¡no!, -gritó con pasión
burst through VI + PREP [+ barrier] → romper (violentamente)
the sun burst through the cloudsel sol apareció de repente entre las nubes

burst

[ˈbɜːrst]
vb [burst] [ˈbɜːrst] (pt, pp)
vt
[+ balloon, paper bag] → faire éclater
to burst a balloon → faire éclater un ballon
[+ tyre] → éclater
[+ pipe] → faire éclater
[+ blister] → percer
to burst its banks [river] → sortir de son lit
The river has burst its banks → Le cours d'eau est sorti de son lit.
vi
éclater
The balloon burst → Le ballon a éclaté.
[tyre] → éclater
[pipe] → éclater
n
(= sudden rush) a burst of energy → une énergie soudaine
a burst of activity → une poussée d'activité
a burst of enthusiasm → un accès d'enthousiasme
a burst of laughter → un éclat de rire
a burst of applause → une salve d'applaudissement
a burst of speed → une pointe de vitesse
a burst of gunfire → une rafale
to do sth in bursts (= sporadically) → faire qch sporadiquement
(= burst pipe) → fuite f (due à une rupture)
adj
a burst pipe → la rupture d'une canalisation
a flood caused by a burst pipe → une inondation causée par la rupture d'une canalisation
burst blood vessel → éclatement m d'un vaisseau sanguin
burst in on
vtinterrompre brutalement
burst into
vt fus (= enter suddenly) [+ room, building] → faire irruption dans
to burst into tears → fondre en larmes
to burst into flames → s'enflammer soudainement
burst open
vis'ouvrir violemment, s'ouvrir soudainement
burst out
vi (= start) to burst out laughing → éclater de rire
burst out of
vtse précipiter hors de

burst

vb: pret, ptp <burst>
n
(of shell etc)Explosion f
(in pipe etc) → Bruch m
(of anger, enthusiasm, activity etc)Ausbruch m; (of flames)(plötzliches) Auflodern; burst of laughterLachsalve f; burst of applauseBeifallssturm m; burst of speedSpurt m; (of cars etc)Riesenbeschleunigung f (inf); a burst of automatic gunfireeine Maschinengewehrsalve; give them another burstverpass ihnen noch eine Salve
vi
(balloon, bubble, tyre)platzen; to burst open (box, door etc)aufspringen; (buds)aufbrechen; (abscess)aufplatzen; (wound)aufbrechen, aufplatzen
(= be full to overflowing: sack etc) → platzen, bersten; to fill something to bursting pointetw bis zum Platzen or Bersten füllen; to be full to burstingzum Platzen or Bersten voll sein; to be bursting with healthvor Gesundheit strotzen; to be bursting with a desire to do somethingvor Begierde brennen, etw zu tun; to be bursting with pridevor Stolz platzen; if I eat any more, I’ll burst (inf)wenn ich noch mehr esse, platze ich (inf); I’m bursting (inf: = need the toilet) → ich muss ganz dringend (inf); he was bursting to tell us (inf)er brannte darauf, uns das zu sagen ? seam
(= start, go suddenly) to burst into tearsin Tränen ausbrechen; to burst into flamesin Flammen aufgehen; he burst past meer schoss an mir vorbei; he burst into the roomer platzte ins Zimmer; we burst through the enemy lineswir durchbrachen die feindlichen Linien; the sun burst through the cloudsdie Sonne brach durch die Wolken; sunlight burst into the roomSonnenlicht fiel plötzlich ins Zimmer; the oil burst from the welldas Öl brach aus der Quelle; to burst into viewplötzlich in Sicht kommen; to burst into songlossingen; to burst into bloomplötzlich aufblühen
vt balloon, bubble, tyrezum Platzen bringen, platzen lassen; (person)kaputtmachen (inf); boiler, pipe, dykesprengen; the river has burst its banksder Fluss ist über die Ufer getreten ? blood vessel

burst

[bɜːst] (burst (vb: pt, pp))
1. n (of shell) → scoppio, esplosione f; (in pipe) → rottura; (of shots) → raffica, scarica
a burst of applause → uno scroscio d'applausi
a burst of laughter/activity → uno scoppio di risa/attività
a burst of speed → uno scatto (di velocità)
2. vt (gen) → far scoppiare or esplodere; (bag) → sfondare, spaccare
the river has burst its banks → il fiume ha rotto gli argini or ha straripato
3. vi
a. (gen) → scoppiare; (tyre, blow out) → scoppiare; (puncture) → bucarsi; (shell, firework) → scoppiare, esplodere; (bag) → sfondarsi, spaccarsi; (dam) → cedere; (blood vessel) → rompersi
the door burst open → la porta si è spalancata di colpo
filled to bursting point → pieno/a da scoppiare
to be bursting with (health, energy) → scoppiare di
to be bursting with pride → sprizzare soddisfazione da tutti i pori
to be bursting at the seams (with) → essere pieno/a zeppo/a (di), traboccare (di)
the room was bursting at the seams → la stanza rigurgitava di persone
I was bursting to tell you (fam) → morivo dalla voglia di dirtelo
b. (go suddenly) to burst out of the roomscappare precipitosamente dalla stanza
the sun burst through the clouds → è sbucato il sole
burst into vi + prep (room) → irrompere in
to burst into flames → prendere fuoco, andare in fiamme
to burst into tears → scoppiare a piangere
burst out vi + adv
a. (exclaim) → esclamare
b. (start) to burst out laughingscoppiare a ridere
to burst out singing → mettersi (improvvisamente) a cantare

burst

(bəːst) past tense, past participle burst verb
1. to break open or in pieces suddenly. The bag/balloon burst.
2. (with in, ~into, ~through etc) to come or go suddenly or violently. He burst in without knocking; He burst into the room; She burst into tears.
3. (of rivers) to overflow or flood (the banks). The river has burst its banks.
noun
1. a break or explosion. a burst in the pipes.
2. an (often sudden and short) outbreak. a burst of applause.
burst open
to open suddenly or violently. The door burst open and she rushed in.

burst

يَنْفَجِر prasknout udbrud platzen σκάω reventar haljeta éclater puknuti scoppiare 破裂する 폭발하다 barsten revne wybuchnąć estourar лопнуть spricka ระเบิด patlamak 爆裂

burst

n. [a sudden outbreak] reventón;
vt. reventar, reventarse, abrirse;
___ into laughterecharse a reír;
___ into tearsdeshacerse en lágrimas;
to ___ outbrotar, reventar;
to ___ openabrirse, reventarse; ___in tearsecharse a llorar.

burst

vt, vi (pret & pp burst) reventar(se)
References in classic literature ?
What attracted Challenger, on the other hand, was a bubbling, gurgling mud geyser, where some strange gas formed great bursting bubbles upon the surface.
The Nexen sale may be a good way to protect a lot of American investors from a bursting bubble.
el e e But as those blocks of empty Old Trafford seats show, we may be witnessing the beginning of a bursting bubble.
Even as economists seek solutions to the threat of another bursting bubble, politicians are praying for one to help get us out of debt and back to double-digit gross domestic product growth.
But the central government must be responsible for inflation in times of overheating, lest a bursting bubble fuel unemployment.
The bursting bubble in these sectors was what started this recession, and it will likely take another few quarters to get these sectors back to something akin to normal.
Well, come on - who doesn't like bursting bubble wrap?
The current financial and economic crisis is probably the worst since the war, a product of a bursting bubble of excessive household borrowing and house prices in Britain, combined with a big global financial crisis.