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Related to burying: burying beetle, interred


tr.v. bur·ied, bur·y·ing, bur·ies
a. To place (a corpse) in a grave, a tomb, or the sea; inter.
b. To dispose of (a corpse) ritualistically by means other than interment or cremation.
a. To place in the ground; cover with earth: The dog buried the bone. The oil was buried deep under the tundra.
b. To place so as to conceal; hide or obscure: buried her face in the pillow; buried the secret deep within himself.
3. To occupy (oneself) with deep concentration; absorb: buried myself in my studies.
4. To put an end to; abandon: buried their quarrel and shook hands.
5. Slang To outdo or defeat by a large margin: The team was buried in the first half by its crosstown rivals.
bury the hatchet
To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.

[Middle English burien, from Old English byrgan; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bur′i·er n.
Word History: Why does bury rhyme with berry and not with jury? The answer goes back to early English times. The late Old English form of the verb bury was byrgan, pronounced approximately (bür′yən). During Middle English times this (ü) sound changed, but with different results in different regions of England: to (o͝o) as in put in the Midlands, to (ĭ) as in pit in southern England, or to (ĕ) as in pet in southeast England. London was located in the East Midlands dialect zone, but because of its status as the capital, its East Midlands dialect was influenced by southern (Saxon) and southeastern (Kentish) dialects. The normal East Midlands development of (ü) was (o͝o), spelled u. Because scribes from the East Midlands pronounced the word with this vowel they tended to spell the word with a u, and this spelling became standard when spellings were fixed after the introduction of printing. The word's pronunciation, however, is southeastern. Bury is the only word in Modern English with a Midlands spelling and a southeastern pronunciation. Similarly, the word busy, from Old English bysig, bisig, and its verb bysgian, bisgian, "to employ," is spelled with the East Midlands dialect u, but pronounced with the southern (Saxon) development of (ü), (ĭ).


A borough of northwest England north-northwest of Manchester.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burying - concealing something under the groundburying - concealing something under the ground
concealing, hiding, concealment - the activity of keeping something secret
reburial, reburying - the act of burying again
References in classic literature ?
He turned over, burying his face in his arm and there he lay, still and motionless.
His companions were not long in comprehending his wishes, and laying aside their firearms, they parted, taking opposite sides of the path, and burying themselves in the thicket, with such cautious movements, that their steps were inaudible.
groaned Bildad, glancing up from the book in which he had again been burying himself.
She caught herself at the side of the bed, and then sank down, burying her face in her hands and bursting into frantic weeping.
The baby employed the intervals in pulling Tom's nose, scratching his face, and burying her fat hands in his woolly hair, which last operation seemed to afford her special content.
She said that this composer had made a complete revolution in music and was burying the old masters one by one.
Yes, that's it, Huck -- that's it; though when you're burying it if you say 'Down bean; off wart; come no more to bother me
A man out in the moonlight DID see a murdered person put under ground in the tobacker field--but it wasn't Uncle Silas that done the burying.
Nothing could show more clearly the kind of child she was than the fact that she instantly perceived the symbolism of the rose, and laid it in the drawer with the dress as if she were burying the whole episode with all its sad memories.