burying


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Related to burying: burying beetle, interred

bur·y

 (bĕr′ē)
tr.v. bur·ied, bur·y·ing, bur·ies
1.
a. To place (a corpse) in a grave, a tomb, or the sea; inter.
b. To dispose of (a corpse) ritualistically by means other than interment or cremation.
2.
a. To place in the ground; cover with earth: The dog buried the bone. The oil was buried deep under the tundra.
b. To place so as to conceal; hide or obscure: buried her face in the pillow; buried the secret deep within himself.
3. To occupy (oneself) with deep concentration; absorb: buried myself in my studies.
4. To put an end to; abandon: buried their quarrel and shook hands.
5. Slang To outdo or defeat by a large margin: The team was buried in the first half by its crosstown rivals.
Idiom:
bury the hatchet
To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.

[Middle English burien, from Old English byrgan; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bur′i·er n.
Word History: Why does bury rhyme with berry and not with jury? The answer goes back to early English times. The late Old English form of the verb bury was byrgan, pronounced approximately (bür′yən). During Middle English times this (ü) sound changed, but with different results in different regions of England: to (o͝o) as in put in the Midlands, to (ĭ) as in pit in southern England, or to (ĕ) as in pet in southeast England. London was located in the East Midlands dialect zone, but because of its status as the capital, its East Midlands dialect was influenced by southern (Saxon) and southeastern (Kentish) dialects. The normal East Midlands development of (ü) was (o͝o), spelled u. Because scribes from the East Midlands pronounced the word with this vowel they tended to spell the word with a u, and this spelling became standard when spellings were fixed after the introduction of printing. The word's pronunciation, however, is southeastern. Bury is the only word in Modern English with a Midlands spelling and a southeastern pronunciation. Similarly, the word busy, from Old English bysig, bisig, and its verb bysgian, bisgian, "to employ," is spelled with the East Midlands dialect u, but pronounced with the southern (Saxon) development of (ü), (ĭ).

Bur·y

 (bĕr′ē)
A borough of northwest England north-northwest of Manchester.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burying - concealing something under the groundburying - concealing something under the ground
concealing, hiding, concealment - the activity of keeping something secret
reburial, reburying - the act of burying again
Translations
References in classic literature ?
1] So much for burying a man at sea without saying prayers over him.
Already he could almost feel those strong, white fangs burying themselves in his neck.
Sire," I said, "I am more astonished than I can express to you at the strange custom which exists in your dominions of burying the living with the dead.