bushel


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bush·el 1

 (bo͝osh′əl)
n.
1. Abbr. bu.
a. A unit of volume or capacity in the US Customary System, used in dry measure and equal to 4 pecks, 2,150.42 cubic inches, or 35.24 liters.
b. A unit of volume or capacity in the British Imperial System, used in dry and liquid measure and equal to 2,219.36 cubic inches or 36.37 liters.
2. A container with the capacity of a bushel.
3. Informal A large amount; a great deal: We have bushels of time, so relax.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman bussel, variant of Old French boissiel, from boisse, one sixth of a bushel, of Celtic origin.]

bush·el 2

 (bo͝osh′əl)
tr.v. bush·eled, bush·el·ing, bush·els or bush·elled or bush·el·ling
To alter or mend (clothing).

[Probably from German bosseln, to do odd jobs, alteration (perhaps influenced by bosseln, to emboss) of basteln, to rig up, mend, probably from Bast, bast fiber (used to make rope), from Middle High German bast, from Old High German.]

bush′el·er, bush′el·ler n.
bush′el·man (-mən) n.

bushel

(ˈbʊʃəl)
n
1. (Units) (formerly) a Brit unit of dry or liquid measure equal to 8 Imperial gallons. 1 Imperial bushel is equivalent to 0.036 37 cubic metres
2. (Units) a US unit of dry measure equal to 64 US pints. 1 US bushel is equivalent to 0.035 24 cubic metres
3. a container with a capacity equal to either of these quantities
4. informal US a large amount; great deal
5. hide one's light under a bushel to conceal one's abilities or good qualities
[C14: from Old French boissel, from boisse one sixth of a bushel, of Gaulish origin]

bushel

(ˈbʊʃəl)
vb, -els, -elling, -elled, -els, -eling or -eled
(Knitting & Sewing) (tr) US to alter or mend (a garment)
[C19: probably from German bosseln to do inferior work, patch, from Middle High German bōzeln to beat, from Old High German bōzan]
ˈbusheller, ˈbusheler, ˈbushelman n

bush•el1

(ˈbʊʃ əl)

n.
1. a unit of dry measure containing 4 pecks, the U.S. bushel being equal to 2150.42 cubic inches or 35.24 liters, and the British imperial bushel being equal to 2219.36 cubic inches or 36.38 liters Abbr.: bu., bush.
2. a container of this capacity.
3. a unit of weight equal to the weight of a bushel of a given commodity.
4. a large, unspecified amount or number: a bushel of kisses.
[1250–1300; Middle English bu(i)sshel < Middle French boissel, derivative of boisse unit of measure]

bush•el2

(ˈbʊʃ əl)

v.t. -eled, -el•ing (esp. Brit.) -elled, el•ling.
to alter or repair.
[1875–80, Amer.; < German bosseln to patch < French bosseler to emboss; see boss2]
bush′el•er; esp. Brit., bush′el•ler, n.

Bushel

 loosely, a large quantity or number.
Examples: bushel of curled hair on his head, 1718; of girls, 1873; of honours, 1680; of money, 1683; of venom, 1374.

bushel


Past participle: busheled/bushelled
Gerund: busheling/bushelling

Imperative
bushel
bushel
Present
I bushel
you bushel
he/she/it bushels
we bushel
you bushel
they bushel
Preterite
I busheled/bushelled
you busheled/bushelled
he/she/it busheled/bushelled
we busheled/bushelled
you busheled/bushelled
they busheled/bushelled
Present Continuous
I am busheling/bushelling
you are busheling/bushelling
he/she/it is busheling/bushelling
we are busheling/bushelling
you are busheling/bushelling
they are busheling/bushelling
Present Perfect
I have busheled/bushelled
you have busheled/bushelled
he/she/it has busheled/bushelled
we have busheled/bushelled
you have busheled/bushelled
they have busheled/bushelled
Past Continuous
I was busheling/bushelling
you were busheling/bushelling
he/she/it was busheling/bushelling
we were busheling/bushelling
you were busheling/bushelling
they were busheling/bushelling
Past Perfect
I had busheled/bushelled
you had busheled/bushelled
he/she/it had busheled/bushelled
we had busheled/bushelled
you had busheled/bushelled
they had busheled/bushelled
Future
I will bushel
you will bushel
he/she/it will bushel
we will bushel
you will bushel
they will bushel
Future Perfect
I will have busheled/bushelled
you will have busheled/bushelled
he/she/it will have busheled/bushelled
we will have busheled/bushelled
you will have busheled/bushelled
they will have busheled/bushelled
Future Continuous
I will be busheling/bushelling
you will be busheling/bushelling
he/she/it will be busheling/bushelling
we will be busheling/bushelling
you will be busheling/bushelling
they will be busheling/bushelling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been busheling/bushelling
you have been busheling/bushelling
he/she/it has been busheling/bushelling
we have been busheling/bushelling
you have been busheling/bushelling
they have been busheling/bushelling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been busheling/bushelling
you will have been busheling/bushelling
he/she/it will have been busheling/bushelling
we will have been busheling/bushelling
you will have been busheling/bushelling
they will have been busheling/bushelling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been busheling/bushelling
you had been busheling/bushelling
he/she/it had been busheling/bushelling
we had been busheling/bushelling
you had been busheling/bushelling
they had been busheling/bushelling
Conditional
I would bushel
you would bushel
he/she/it would bushel
we would bushel
you would bushel
they would bushel
Past Conditional
I would have busheled/bushelled
you would have busheled/bushelled
he/she/it would have busheled/bushelled
we would have busheled/bushelled
you would have busheled/bushelled
they would have busheled/bushelled

bushel

(bu) A measure of dry volume. In the US, 1 bu = 8 gal (64 US pt); in the UK, 1 bu = 8 gal (64 UK pt). The measures are not to be confused: 1.03 US bu = 1 UK bu.

Bushel

A measure of volume and usually considered four pecks (eight gallons). However, in the days when bushels and pecks were commonly used, U.S. dry measure, U.S. liquid measure, and British Imperial liquid and dry measure were all likely to be encountered. As an example of how these different standards can affect calculations, consider the old saying “a pint is a pound the world around.” At the beginning of the twenty-first century, if one weighed a pint of water from a kitchen measuring cup, it would be found to weigh quite close to one pound. Since a bushel contains eight gallons, or sixty-four pints, then a bushel of water should weigh around sixty-four pounds, which is about what a cubic foot of water weighs. One would then conclude that the volume of a bushel is about one cubic foot. However, a bushel is really a dry measure and contains 2150.42 cubic inches (1.24 cubic feet). The “pint is a pound” assumes a liquid measure in which a pint is one-eighth of a wine, or U.S. liquid gallon, and contains 28.875 cubic inches, whereas a dry measure pint contains 33.6 cubic inches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bushel - a United States dry measure equal to 4 pecks or 2152.42 cubic inches
United States dry unit - a unit of measurement of capacity for dry substances officially adopted in the United States Customary System
peck - a United States dry measure equal to 8 quarts or 537.605 cubic inches
2.bushel - a British imperial capacity measure (liquid or dry) equal to 4 pecksbushel - a British imperial capacity measure (liquid or dry) equal to 4 pecks
British capacity unit, Imperial capacity unit - a unit of measure for capacity officially adopted in the British Imperial System; British units are both dry and wet
congius, Imperial gallon, gallon - a British imperial capacity measure (liquid or dry) equal to 4 quarts or 4.545 liters
peck - a British imperial capacity measure (liquid or dry) equal to 2 gallons
quarter - a quarter of a hundredweight (28 pounds)
Verb1.bushel - restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or brokenbushel - restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please"
ameliorate, improve, meliorate, amend, better - to make better; "The editor improved the manuscript with his changes"
tinker, fiddle - try to fix or mend; "Can you tinker with the T.V. set--it's not working right"; "She always fiddles with her van on the weekend"
fill - plug with a substance; "fill a cavity"
patch, piece - repair by adding pieces; "She pieced the china cup"
cobble - repair or mend; "cobble shoes"
repoint, point - repair the joints of bricks; "point a chimney"
troubleshoot, trouble-shoot - solve problems; "He is known to be good at trouble-shooting"
patch up, patch - mend by putting a patch on; "patch a hole"
resole, sole - put a new sole on; "sole the shoes"
revamp, vamp - provide (a shoe) with a new vamp; "revamp my old boots"
reheel, heel - put a new heel on; "heel shoes"
darn - repair by sewing; "darn socks"

bushel

noun
Informal. An indeterminately great amount or number:
jillion, million (often used in plural), multiplicity, ream, trillion.
Informal: gob (often used in plural), heap (often used in plural), load (often used in plural), lot, oodles, passel, peck, scad (often used in plural), slew, wad, zillion.
Translations

bushel

[ˈbʊʃəl] nboisseau m

bushel

nScheffel m; to hide one’s light under a bushel (prov) → sein Licht unter den Scheffel stellen (prov)

bushel

[ˈbʊʃl] nstaio
References in classic literature ?
You shall have the wizard for a bushel of money, but I must have full measure.
There's a man by the name of Perry--lives just across the Missouri line--who has thrashed fifteen hundred bushel and he'll lend you three hundred or so.
Tracle, me darlint, and I wish I may be drownthed dead in a bog, if it's not mesilf, Sir Pathrick O'Grandison, Barronitt, that'll make a houl bushel o' love to yur leddyship, in the twinkling o' the eye of a Londonderry purraty.
Spenlow solemnly, in conclusion; but when the price of wheat per bushel had been highest, the Commons had been busiest; and a man might lay his hand upon his heart, and say this to the whole world, - 'Touch the Commons, and down comes the country
If his notions of hidden treasure had been analyzed, they would have been found to consist of a handful of real dimes and a bushel of vague, splen- did, ungraspable dollars.
The twenty-six officers were at the lower end of the table, and the Lion and the Tiger also had seats, and were served on golden platters, that held a half a bushel at one time.
From the extravagant value placed upon the article, I verily believe, that with a bushel of common Liverpool salt all the real estate in Typee might have been purchased.
The Jewish money-changers have their dens close at hand, and all day long are counting bronze coins and transferring them from one bushel basket to another.
As if your true politician's hat were not a bushel under which he always hides his light!
she hath scarce lain in a week, and there was she, this dreadful weather, in a cold room, without any curtains to her bed, and not a bushel of coals in her house to supply her with fire; her second son, that sweet little fellow, lies ill of a quinzy in the same bed with his mother; for there is no other bed in the house.
The million workers in the nation's wheat fields have worked a hundred days each, and the total product of the labor is a billion bushels, so the value of a bushel of wheat is the tenth part of a farm labor-day.
They boasted about the number of bushels they had picked in a day, but they complained you could not make money now as in former times: then they paid you a shilling for five bushels, but now the rate was eight and even nine bushels to the shilling.