but


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but

(bŭt; bət when unstressed)
conj.
1. On the contrary: the plan caused not prosperity but ruin.
2. Contrary to expectation; yet: She organized her work but accomplished very little. He is tired but happy.
3. Usage Problem Used to indicate an exception: No one but she saw the prowler.
4. With the exception that; except that. Often used with that: would have joined the band but he couldn't spare the time; would have resisted but that they lacked courage.
5. Informal Without the result that: It never rains but it pours.
6. Informal That. Often used after a negative: There is no doubt but right will prevail.
7. That ... not. Used after a negative or question: There never is a tax law presented but someone will oppose it.
8. Informal Than: They had no sooner arrived but they turned around and left.
prep.
Usage Problem Except.
adv.
1. Merely; just; only: hopes that lasted but a moment.
2. Used as an intensive: Get out of here but fast!
n.
A concern or objection: My offer is final, no ifs, ands, or buts.
Idiom:
but for
Were it not for: except for: We would have reached the summit but for the weather.

[Middle English, from Old English būtan; see ud- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Should it be No one but I has read it or No one but me has read it? The traditional argument for I is that but is a conjunction in these sentences, coordinating the two parallel subjects of read ("no one" and the speaker), and thus should be followed by the subjective form I. A problem for this analysis is that the objective form me is appropriate when the but phrase occurs at the end of a sentence, as in No one has read it but me. In fact, but is a preposition in both of these constructions. If but were truly a conjunction, the verb would agree in person and number with the noun or pronoun following but, yielding No one but the students have read it, which is clearly wrong. Furthermore, but me in these sentences acts just like a prepositional phrase in being detachable from the rest of its phrase: No one but me has left / No one has left but me is similar to the alternation between John, along with everyone else in the class, left and John left, along with everyone else in the class—both of which contrast with a similar sentence using a conjunction such as and: one can say John and everyone else in the class left, but not John left and everyone else in the class. For these reasons but should be treated as a preposition in these constructions, taking the objective pronouns me and them in all positions. A large majority of the Usage Panel agreed with this analysis in our 2016 survey; only 46 percent accepted No one has read it but I and only 36 accepted No one but I has read it, whereas at least 92 percent accepted the same sentences with me. · But is generally not followed by a comma. Correct written style requires Kim wanted to go, but we stayed, not Kim wanted to go, but, we stayed. · Some people believe that but may not be used to begin a sentence, but in fact this usage is acceptable in all levels of style. See Usage Notes at and, cannot, doubt, however, I1.

but

(bʌt; unstressed bət)
conj (coordinating)
1. contrary to expectation: he cut his knee but didn't cry.
2. in contrast; on the contrary: I like opera but my husband doesn't.
3. (usually used after a negative) other than: we can't do anything but wait.
conj (subordinating)
4. (usually used after a negative) without it happening or being the case that: we never go out but it rains.
5. (foll by that) except that: nothing is impossible but that we live forever.
6. archaic if not; unless
sentence connector
informal used to introduce an exclamation: my, but you're nice.
prep
7. except; save: they saved all but one of the pigs.
8. but for were it not for: but for you, we couldn't have managed.
adv
9. just; merely; only: he was but a child; I can but try.
10. informal Scot and Austral and NZ though; however: it's a rainy day: warm, but.
11. all but almost; practically: he was all but dead when we found him.
n
an objection (esp in the phrase ifs and buts)
[Old English būtan without, outside, except, from be by + ūtan out; related to Old Saxon biūtan, Old High German biūzan]

but

(bʌt)
n
(Architecture) the outer room of a two-roomed cottage: usually the kitchen
prep, adv
(Architecture) in or into the outer part (of a house). Compare ben1
[C18: from but (adv) outside, hence, outer room; see but1]

but

(bʌt; unstressed bət)

conj.
1. on the contrary: My brother went, but I did not.
2. and yet; nevertheless: strange but true.
3. except; save: did nothing but complain.
4. without the circumstance that: It never rains but it pours.
5. otherwise than: There is no hope but by prayer.
6. that (used esp. after doubt, deny, etc., with a negative): I don't doubt but you'll do it.
7. that … not: No leaders ever existed but they were optimists.
8. (used to introduce an exclamatory expression): But that's wonderful!
9. Informal. than: It no sooner started raining but it stopped.
prep.
10. with the exception of: No one replied but me.
11. other than: nothing but trouble.
adv.
12. only; just: There is but one answer.
n.
13. buts, reservations or objections: You'll do as you're told, no buts about it.
Idioms:
but for, except for; were it not for.
[before 900; Middle English buten, Old English būtan for phrase be ūtan on the outside, without]
usage: When but is understood as a conjunction and the pronoun following it is understood as the subject of an incompletely expressed clause, the pronoun is in the subjective case: Everyone lost faith in the plan but she (did not lose faith). In virtually identical contexts, when but is understood as a preposition, the pronoun following it is in the objective case: Everyone lost faith but her. The prepositional use is more common. When but and its following pronoun occur near the beginning of a sentence, the subjective case often appears: Everyone but she lost faith in the plan. See also and, doubt, than.

but

You use but to introduce something that contrasts with what you have just said.

1. used to link clauses

But is usually used to link clauses.

It was a long walk but it was worth it.
I try to understand, but I can't.

You can put but at the beginning of a sentence when you are replying to someone, or writing in a conversational style.

'Somebody wants you on the telephone.' – 'But nobody knows I'm here.'
I always thought that. But then I'm probably wrong.
2. used to link adjectives or adverbs

You can use but to link adjectives or adverbs that contrast with each other.

We stayed in a small but comfortable hotel.
Quickly but silently she ran out of the room.
3. used with negative words to mean 'only'

But is sometimes used after negative words such as nothing, no-one, nowhere, or none. A negative word followed by but means 'only'. For example, 'We have nothing but carrots' means 'We only have carrots'.

John had lived nowhere but the farm.
He cared about no one but himself.
4. meaning 'except'

But is also used after all and after words beginning with every- or any-. When but is used after one of these words, it means 'except'. For example, 'He enjoyed everything but maths' means 'He enjoyed everything except maths'.

There was no time for anything but work.
Could anyone but Wilhelm have done it?
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.but - and nothing more; "I was merely asking"; "it is simply a matter of time"; "just a scratch"; "he was only a child"; "hopes that last but a moment"

but

conjunction yet, however, though, although, nevertheless, even so, all the same, for all that, in spite of that, despite that, be that as it may You are awful. But I like you.
1. however, still, yet, nevertheless 'But,' he added, 'the vast majority must accept a common future.'
preposition
1. except (for), save, bar, barring, excepting, other than, excluding, omitting, with the exception of He was forced to wind up everything but the hotel business.
adverb
1. only, just, simply, merely St Anton is but a snowball's throw away from Lech.

but

adverb
To the exclusion of anyone or anything else:
Translations
إلا، باستثناء، ما عدالكنلَكِن
alekroměvyjma
menden næste igenmed undtagelse af
sedtamen
entkuidpeale
muttapaitsivaan
aliosim
azonbandehanemviszont
namuntapitetapi
aî frátöldum, nemaen
しかし
그러나
beto
betizņemot
dar
aleavšak
ampakrazentodačeprava
sem
fastförutommenutanutom
แต่
fakatamaancak-den/dan başkahariç
nhưng

but

[bʌt]
A. CONJ
1. (contrasting) → pero
she was poor but she was honestera pobre pero honrada
I want to go but I can't afford itquiero ir, pero no tengo el dinero
but it does move!¡pero sí se mueve!
2. (in direct contradiction) → sino
he's not Spanish but Italianno es español sino italiano
he didn't sing but he shoutedno cantó sino que gritó
3. (subordinating)
we never go out but it rainsnunca salimos sin que llueva
I never go there but I think of younunca voy allá sin pensar en ti
it never rains but it poursllueve sobre mojado
4. (as linker)
but then he couldn't have knownpor otro lado, no podía saber or haberlo sabido
but then you must be my cousin!¡entonces tú debes ser mi primo!
B. ADVsólo, solamente, no más que
she's but a childno es más que una niña
all but nakedcasi desnudo
you can but trycon intentar no se pierde nada
if I could but speak to himsi solamente pudiese hablar con él
one cannot but admire himno se puede sino admirarle
had I but knownde haberlo sabido (yo), si lo hubiera sabido
C. PREP (= except) → menos, excepto, salvo
anything but thatcualquier cosa menos eso
everyone but himtodos menos él
but for yousi no fuera por ti
the last but oneel/la penúltimo/a
the last but threeel tercero antes del último
there is nothing for it but to pay upno hay más remedio que pagar
who but she could have said something like that?¿quién sino ella podría haber dicho semejante cosa?
D. Npero m, objeción f
no buts about it!¡no hay pero que valga!
come on, no buts, off to bed with you!¡vale ya! no hay pero que valga, ¡a la cama!
BUT
There are three main ways of translating the conjunction but: pero, sino and sino que.
Contrasting
 To introduce a contrast or a new idea, use pero:
Strange but interesting Extraño pero interesante I thought he would help me but he refused Creí que me ayudaría, pero se negó
 In informal language, pero can be used at the start of a comment:
But where are you going to put it? Pero ¿dónde lo vas a poner?
! In formal language, sin embargo or no obstante may be preferred:
But, in spite of the likely benefits, he still opposed the idea Sin embargo or No obstante, a pesar de las probables ventajas, todavía se oponía a la idea
Correcting a previous negative
 When but or but rather introduces a noun phrase, prepositional phrase or verb in the infinitive which corrects a previous negative, translate but using sino:
Not wine, but vinegar No vino, sino vinagre They aren't from Seville, but from Bilbao No son de Sevilla, sino de Bilbao His trip to London was not to investigate the case but to hush it up Su viaje a Londres no fue para investigar el caso sino para taparlo
 When but or but rather introduces a verb clause (or requires a verb clause in Spanish) which corrects a previous negative, translate using sino que:
He's not asking you to do what he says but (rather) to listen to him No te pide que hagas lo que él dice, sino que le escuches
Not only ... but also
 When the but also part of this construction contains ((SUBJECT)) + ((VERB)), translate using no sólo or no solamente ... sino que también or sino que además:
It will not only cause tension, but it will also damage the economy No sólo or No solamente provocará tensiones, sino que además or sino que también dañará la economía
 When the but also part does not contain ((SUBJECT)) + ((VERB)), translate using no sólo or no solamente ... sino también or sino además:
Not only rich but also powerful No sólo or No solamente rico sino también or sino además poderoso We don't only want to negotiate but also to take decisions No queremos sólo or solamente negociar, sino también tomar decisiones

but

[ˈbʌt](STRONG) [bət]
conj (= however) → mais
I'd like to come, but I'm busy → J'aimerais venir mais je suis occupé.
but then again (= on the other hand) → mais d'un autre coté
but then (= but of course) → mais (à vrai dire)
prep
(= apart from, except)
Nobody but him can do it → Lui seul peut le faire.
nothing but → rien d'autre que
We've had nothing but trouble → Nous n'avons eu que des ennuis.
but for you → sans toi
but for your help → sans ton aide
anything but that → tout sauf or excepté ça, tout mais pas ça
the last but one (British)l'avant-dernier/ière
I cannot help but think, I cannot but think → je ne peux pas m'empêcher de penser
adv (= just, only) → ne ... que
She's but a child → Elle n'est qu'une enfant.
had I but known → si seulement j'avais su
all but finished → pratiquement terminé
anything but finished → tout sauf fini, très loin d'être fini

but

conj
aber; but you must know that …Sie müssen aber wissen, dass …, aber Sie müssen wissen, dass …; but HE didn’t know thataber er hat das nicht gewusst, er hat das aber nicht gewusst; but he didn’t know thater aber hat das nicht gewusst; they all went but I didn’tsie sind alle gegangen, nur ich nicht
not X but Ynicht X sondern Y
(subordinating) → ohne dass; never a week passes but she is illkeine Woche vergeht, ohne dass sie krank ist; I would have helped but that I was ill (old, liter)ich hätte geholfen, wäre ich nicht krank gewesen (old)
but then he couldn’t have known thataber er hat das ja gar nicht wissen können; but then you must be my brother!dann müssen Sie ja mein Bruder sein!; but then do you mean to say …wollen Sie dann etwa sagen; but then it is well paidaber dafür wird es gut bezahlt
adv she’s but a childsie ist doch noch ein Kind; I cannot (help) but think that …ich kann nicht umhin zu denken, dass …; one cannot but admire him/suspect that …man kann ihn nur bewundern/nur annehmen, dass …; you can but trydu kannst es immerhin versuchen; I had no alternative but to leavemir blieb keine andere Wahl als zu gehen; she left but a few minutes agosie ist erst vor ein paar Minuten gegangen; Napoleon, to name but one, lived hereNapoleon, um nur einen zu nennen, hat hier gelebt
prep no one but me could do itniemand außer mir or nur ich konnte es tun; who but Fred would …?wer außer Fred würde …?; anything but that!(alles,) nur das nicht!; it was anything but simpledas war alles andere als einfach; he/it was nothing but troubleer/das hat nichts als or nur Schwierigkeiten gemacht; the last house but one/two/threedas vorletzte/vorvorletzte/drittletzte Haus; the first but oneder/die/das Zweite; the next street but one/two/threedie übernächste/überübernächste Straße/vier Straßen weiter; but for you I would be deadohne Sie wäre ich tot, wenn Sie nicht gewesen wären, wäre ich tot; I could definitely live in Scotland, but for the weatherich könnte ganz bestimmt in Schottland leben, wenn das Wetter nicht wäre
n no buts about itkein Aber nt

but

(bat) conjunction
used to show a contrast between two or more things. John was there, but Peter was not.
preposition
except (for). no-one but me; the next road but one.

but

لَكِن ale men aber αλλά pero mutta mais ali ma しかし 그러나 maar men ale mas но men แต่ fakat nhưng 但是
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Keogh confirmed: "There was always a number of ifs and buts - mostly buts, when Paul agreed to join, but it does give us another option.
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Heinlein was a kind of socialist, no ifs, ands, or buts about it, during the period that he wrote For Us, the Living," Silver says.
Le Raja devra au moins s'inspirer du nouveau promu, le Mouloudia d'Oujda, qu'il a battu difficilement lors de la journee ecoulee sur un but marque dans les derniers moments de la rencontre.
L'equipe representant la region du Gharb-Chrarda-Beni Hssen a remporte, samedi, la premiere edition du "Tournoi national de la sante 2013", en battant en finale l'equipe de la region du Grand Casablanca sur le score de 5 buts a 2.
I would have liked us not to have lost the 10 points and had another go but that's ifs and buts and there's no use in looking back now.
I recall a friend telling me one day that I was fond of the word "but", as in "that was a good something-or-other but.