butler


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but·ler

 (bŭt′lər)
n.
The head servant in a household who is usually in charge of food service, the care of silverware, and the deportment of the other servants.

[Middle English, from Old French bouteillier, bottle bearer, from bouteille, botele, bottle; see bottle.]

butler

(ˈbʌtlə)
n
(Professions) the male servant of a household in charge of the wines, table, etc: usually the head servant
[C13: from Old French bouteillier, from bouteille bottle1]

Butler

(ˈbʌtlə)
n
1. (Biography) Joseph. 1692–1752, English bishop and theologian, author of Analogy of Religion (1736)
2. (Biography) Josephine (Elizabeth). 1828–1906, British social reformer, noted esp for her campaigns against state regulation of prostitution
3. (Biography) Reg, full name Reginald Cotterell Butler. 1913–81, British metal sculptor; his works include The Unknown Political Prisoner (1953)
4. (Biography) R(ichard) A(usten), Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, known as Rab Butler. 1902–82, British Conservative politician: Chancellor of the Exchequer (1951–55); Home Secretary (1957–62); Foreign Secretary (1963–64)
5. (Biography) Samuel. 1612–80, English poet and satirist; author of Hudibras (1663–78)
6. (Biography) Samuel. 1835–1902, British novelist, noted for his satirical work Erewhon (1872) and his autobiographical novel The Way of All Flesh (1903)

but•ler

(ˈbʌt lər)

n.
the chief male servant of a household, usu. in charge of wines and liquors, the serving of meals, and the supervision of other servants.
[1250–1300; Middle English buteler < Anglo-French butuiller; see bottle]

But•ler

(ˈbʌt lər)

n.
1. Benjamin Franklin, 1818–93, U.S. politician and Union general in the Civil War.
2. Nicholas Murray, 1862–1947, U.S. educator; Nobel peace prize 1931.
3. Samuel, 1612–80, English poet.
4. Samuel, 1835–1902, English novelist and satirist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.butler - a manservant (usually the head servant of a household) who has charge of wines and the tablebutler - a manservant (usually the head servant of a household) who has charge of wines and the table
manservant - a man servant
2.Butler - English novelist who described a fictitious land he called Erewhon (1835-1902)
3.Butler - English poet (1612-1680)
Translations
Mundschenk

butler

[ˈbʌtləʳ] Nmayordomo m

butler

[ˈbʌtlər] nmaître m d'hôtel

butler

nButler m

butler

[ˈbʌtləʳ] nmaggiordomo
References in classic literature ?
Butler," she said one afternoon, when grammar and arithmetic and poetry had been put aside.
Gerald Arbuthnot Farquhar, Butler Francis, Footman Lady Hunstanton Lady Caroline Pontefract Lady Stutfield Mrs.
Any man under thirty years of age who tells you he is not afraid of an English butler lies.
Lights," commanded Master Freddie; and the butler pressed a button, and a flood of brilliant incandescence streamed from above, half-blinding Jurgis.
Altogether there are eight maids, the cook, the butler, two footmen, and a boy.
She was not fond of letter-writing and she had allowed her correspondence to accumulate; but she was disposing of it in an energetic and conscientious way, when the entrance of Wrench, the butler, interrupted her.
LORD HOLCHESTER'S servants--with the butler at their head--were on the look-out for Mr.
The newly married pair, on their arrival in Harley Street, Cavendish Square, London, were received by the Chief Butler.
An easy-going, free-handed gentleman," said Ames, the butler.
And now," continued the butler, addressing the knife-boy, "reach me a candle, and we'll get this through hands at once.
Then, brother Ned took the head of the table, and brother Charles the foot; and Tim Linkinwater's sister sat on the left hand of brother Ned, and Tim Linkinwater himself on his right: and an ancient butler of apoplectic appearance, and with very short legs, took up his position at the back of brother Ned's armchair, and, waving his right arm preparatory to taking off the covers with a flourish, stood bolt upright and motionless.
My lady is served," says the butler in black, in an immense white shirt-frill, that looked as if it had been one of the Queen Elizabeth's ruffs depicted in the hall; and so, taking Mr.

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