buttoned-down


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

but·ton-down

(bŭt′n-doun′)
adj.
1. Having buttons extending down the front from the collar to the waist: a button-down shirt.
2. Fastened down by buttons: a button-down collar.
3. also but·toned-down (bŭt′nd-) Conservative, conventional, or unimaginative: "a colorful character in the buttoned-down, dull-gray world of business" (Newsweek).
n.
A button-down shirt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.buttoned-down - unimaginatively conventional; "a colorful character in the buttoned-down, dull-grey world of business"- Newsweek
conventional - unimaginative and conformist; "conventional bourgeois lives"; "conventional attitudes"

button-down

also buttoned-down
adjective
Conforming to established practice or standards:
Slang: square.
References in periodicals archive ?
Back in the early '90s when comedy was being referred to as 'the new rock and roll' this pair of geography teacher-a-likes were the buttoned-down, tweed-jacketed square pegs to Baddiel and Newman's slightly more hip and cool counterparts.
Damon (another Boston native) has a perfect buttoned-down intensity, while the angst of DiCaprio's Costigan is palpable.
In 1965, when The Offering was shot, China was a closed country and Toronto a buttoned-down, Anglo Saxon town.
With its potential for serious spills on rough terrain, mountain biking would seem more suited to twentysomething thrill-seekers than buttoned-down executives twice or three times their age.
But rather than trafficking in overt anatomical distortions or historical mannerism, Cerletty prefers a steadier, more buttoned-down, domestic center.
Making executive dressing more user-friendly this season: stretchy microfibers, fine silks and wools, splashes of color and some fun surprises--for example, denim dressed up with crisp derailing or a woman's lace-up shirt that's anything but buttoned-down.
By the late 19605, however, the message movie's buttoned-down pieties, not to mention its confidence in various authority figures to solve social problems, seemed embarrassingly dated.
GEORGE is a buttoned-down Nigerian-American three days away from an arranged marriage.
The plot goes roughly like this: John Oliver Banion, a buttoned-down commentator in his late forties with tortoiseshell glasses, his own Sunday morning TV show and a wife named Bitsey, is at the top of the Washington food chain.