buttressed

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Related to buttresse: contrefort

but·tress

 (bŭt′rĭs)
n.
1. A structure, usually brick or stone, built against a wall for support or reinforcement.
2. Something resembling a buttress, as:
a. The flared base of certain tree trunks.
b. A horny growth on the heel of a horse's hoof.
3. Something that serves to support, prop, or reinforce: "The law is by its very nature a buttress of the status quo" (J. William Fulbright).
tr.v. but·tressed, but·tress·ing, but·tress·es
1. To support or reinforce with a buttress.
2. To sustain, prop, or bolster: "The author buttresses her analysis with lengthy dissections of several of Moore's poems" (Warren Woessner).

[Middle English buteras, from Old French bouterez, from bouter, to strike against, of Germanic origin; see bhau- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.buttressed - held up by braces or buttresses
supported - held up or having the weight borne especially from below; "supported joints in a railroad track have ties directly under the rail ends"
References in classic literature ?
Daylight knew also his history, the prime old American stock from which he had descended, his own war record, the John Dowsett before him who had been one of the banking buttresses of the Cause of the Union, the Commodore Dowsett of the War of 1812 the General Dowsett of Revolutionary fame, and that first far Dowsett, owner of lands and slaves in early New England.
The wall is of immense thickness, and is propped or defended by six huge external buttresses which project from the circle, and rise up against the sides of the tower is if to strengthen or to support it.
At the far side of the outer court a narrow door let into the angle made by one of the buttresses with the wall.
They stood awhile consulting under the buttresses of Saint Giles; thence they adjourned to the lodgings of one of the number in North Castle Street, where (for that matter) they might have had quite as good a supper, and far better drink, than in the dangerous paradise from which they had been routed.
I saw little of the mischief wrought by the Martians until I reached Welling- ton Street, and there I saw the red weed clambering over the buttresses of Waterloo Bridge.
At Notre-Dame it was a tiny cell situated on the roof of the side aisle, beneath the flying buttresses, precisely at the spot where the wife of the present janitor of the towers has made for herself a garden, which is to the hanging gardens of Babylon what a lettuce is to a palm-tree, what a porter's wife is to a Semiramis.
They slipped through the buttresses, the rafters, the joists; they ran from beam to beam as they might have run from tree to tree in a forest.
In one place the road was tunneled through a shoulder of the mountain; from there one looked down into a gorge with a rushing torrent in it, and on every hand was a charming view of rocky buttresses and wooded heights.
His beautiful countess and her young daughter waved him a tearful adieu from the battering-rams and buttresses of the fortress, and he galloped away with a happy heart.
We left the old town of Sonoma to the right and rode up a canyon that lay between outlying buttresses of the mountain.
though exceedingly fractured, yet remained standing; but the vast buttresses (at right angles to them, and therefore parallel to the walls that fell) were in many cases cut clean off, as if by a chisel, and hurled to the ground.
The other issue is that both Hoddom and Brydekirk bridges over the River Annan have small but ineffectual buttresses on the downstream wall of the roadway.