buying


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buy

 (bī)
v. bought (bôt), buy·ing, buys
v.tr.
1. To acquire in exchange for money or its equivalent; purchase. See Note at boughten.
2. To be capable of purchasing: "Certainly there are lots of things in life that money won't buy" (Ogden Nash).
3. To acquire by sacrifice, exchange, or trade: wanted to buy love with gifts.
4. To bribe: tried to buy a judge.
5. Informal To accept the truth or feasibility of: The officer didn't buy my lame excuse for speeding.
v.intr.
To purchase something; act as a purchaser.
n.
1. Something bought or for sale; a purchase.
2. An act of purchasing: a drug buy.
3. Something that is underpriced; a bargain.
Phrasal Verbs:
buy down
To pay an upfront fee to reduce (an interest rate) over part or all of the term of a loan.
buy into
1. To acquire a stake or interest in: bought into a risky real estate venture.
2. Informal To believe in, especially wholeheartedly or uncritically: couldn't buy into that brand of conservatism.
buy off
To bribe (an official, for example) in order to secure improper cooperation or gain exemption from a regulation or legal consequence.
buy out
To purchase the entire stock, business rights, or interests of.
buy up
To purchase all that is available of.
Idioms:
buy it Slang
To be killed.
buy the farm Slang
To die, especially suddenly or violently.
buy time
To increase the time available for a specific purpose: "A moderate recovery thus buys time for Congress and the Administration to whittle the deficit" (G. David Wallace).

[Middle English bien, beyen, from Old English bycgan, byg-; akin to Gothic bugjan, from Germanic *bugjanan, of unknown origin.]

buy′a·ble adj.

buying

(ˈbaɪɪŋ)
n
1.
a. the action or an instance of purchasing something
b. (as modifier): buying patterns.
2. (Economics) (as modifier): buying patterns.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buying - the act of buyingbuying - the act of buying; "buying and selling fill their days"; "shrewd purchasing requires considerable knowledge"
purchase - the acquisition of something for payment; "they closed the purchase with a handshake"
shopping - searching for or buying goods or services; "went shopping for a reliable plumber"; "does her shopping at the mall rather than down town"
catalog buying, mail-order buying - buying goods to be shipped through the mail
viatication, viaticus - purchasing insurance policies for cash from terminally ill policy holders
Translations

buying

[ˈbaɪɪŋ]
A. Ncompra f
B. CPD buying power Npoder m adquisitivo
References in classic literature ?
Why, you see, the girls are always buying them, and unless you want to be thought mean, you must do it too.
When my fa- ther died I prayed all night, just as I did sometimes when my brother was in town drinking and going about buying the things for us.
AFTER LENA CAME To Black Hawk, I often met her downtown, where she would be matching sewing silk or buying `findings' for Mrs.
A little harmless gossip ensued on various themes, such as where old Aunt Sally got her new red headkerchief, and how "Missis was a going to give Lizzy that spotted muslin gown, when she'd got her new berage made up;" and how Mas'r Shelby was thinking of buying a new sorrel colt, that was going to prove an addition to the glories of the place.
I won their gratitude by buying out all the hogs at the lump sum of sixteen pennies, which was rather above latest quotations.
She said, don't say nothing about the Proc- tors, but only about the Apthorps -- which 'll be per- fectly true, because she is going there to speak about their buying the house; I know it, because she told me so herself.
He waylaid other boys as they came, and went on buying tickets of various colors ten or fifteen minutes longer.
Having now said enough to make his poverty clear, and to do away the necessity of buying a pair of ear-rings for each of his sisters, in his next visit at Gray's his thoughts took a cheerfuller turn, and he began to congratulate Elinor on having such a friend as Mrs.
Hiring a mistress is the next worse thing to buying a slave: both are often by nature, and always by position, inferior: and to live familiarly with inferiors is degrading.
At six in the morning, I was in Covent Garden Market, buying a bouquet for Dora.
Joe made occasional trips with Uncle Pumblechook on market-days, to assist him in buying such household stuffs and goods as required a woman's judgment; Uncle Pumblechook being a bachelor and reposing no confidences in his domestic servant.
But I shall keep Wildfire, now I've got him, though I'd a bid of a hundred and fifty for him the other day, from a man over at Flitton--he's buying for Lord Cromleck--a fellow with a cast in his eye, and a green waistcoat.