buzzing


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buzz

 (bŭz)
v. buzzed, buzz·ing, buzz·es
v.intr.
1. To make a low droning or vibrating sound like that of a bee.
2.
a. To talk, often excitedly, in low tones.
b. To be abuzz; hum: The department was buzzing with rumors.
3. To move quickly and busily; bustle.
4. To make a signal with a buzzer.
v.tr.
1. To cause to buzz.
2. To utter in a rapid, low voice: "What is he buzzing in my ears?" (Robert Browning).
3. Informal To fly low over: The plane buzzed the control tower.
4. To call or signal with a buzzer.
5. To make a telephone call to.
6. To give a buzzcut to.
n.
1. A vibrating, humming, or droning sound.
2. A low murmur: a buzz of talk.
3. A telephone call: Give me a buzz at nine.
4. Slang
a. A state of pleasant intoxication, as from alcohol.
b. A state of stimulation or overstimulation, as from caffeine.
5. Slang
a. Excited interest or attention: "The biggest buzz surrounds the simplest antioxidants: vitamins" (Carol Turkington).
b. Rumor; gossip: the latest buzz from Hollywood.
6. A buzzcut.
Phrasal Verb:
buzz off Informal
To leave quickly; go away: I told them in no uncertain terms to buzz off.

[Middle English bussen, of imitative origin.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.buzzing - noisy like the sound of a beebuzzing - noisy like the sound of a bee; "the room was abuzz over the latest scandal"
noisy - full of or characterized by loud and nonmusical sounds; "a noisy cafeteria"; "a small noisy dog"
Translations

buzzing

[ˈbʌzɪŋ] Nzumbido m

buzzing

[ˈbʌzɪŋ] n [machine] → vrombissement m

buzzing

[ˈbʌzɪŋ] nronzio

buzzing

n zumbido
References in classic literature ?
But the little buzzing things that lived in the grass were all dead--all but one.
The little stinging, buzzing imps succeeded in dispelling a mood which might have held her there in the darkness half a night longer.
When Clifford heard their sunny, buzzing murmur, in the heart of the great yellow blossoms, he looked about him with a joyful sense of warmth, and blue sky, and green grass, and of God's free air in the whole height from earth to heaven.
Apparently there had been some appalling act of justice recently inflicted, for his scholars were all busily intent upon their books, or slyly whispering behind them with one eye kept upon the master; and a kind of buzzing stillness reigned throughout the schoolroom.
The air was full of the smell of flowers, and the buzzing of insects, and the twittering of birds, and there were no people, no wagons, there was no stir of life, nothing going on.
Seventy or eighty years ago Napoleon was the only man in Europe who could really be called a traveler; he was the only man who had devoted his attention to it and taken a powerful interest in it; he was the only man who had traveled extensively; but now everybody goes everywhere; and Switzerland, and many other regions which were unvisited and unknown remotenesses a hundred years ago, are in our days a buzzing hive of restless strangers every summer.