by hook or by crook


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hook

 (ho͝ok)
n.
1.
a. A curved or sharply bent device, usually of metal, used to catch, drag, suspend, or fasten something else.
b. A fishhook.
2. Something shaped like a hook, especially:
a. A curved or barbed plant or animal part.
b. A short angled or curved line on a letter.
c. A sickle.
3.
a. A sharp bend or curve, as in a river.
b. A point or spit of land with a sharply curved end.
4. A means of catching or ensnaring; a trap.
5. Slang
a. A means of attracting interest or attention; an enticement: a sales hook.
b. Music A catchy motif or refrain: "sugary hard rock melodies [and] ear candy hooks" (Boston Globe).
6. Sports
a. A short swinging blow in boxing delivered with a crooked arm.
b. The course of a ball that curves in a direction away from the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the left of a right-handed player.
c. A stroke that sends a ball on such a course.
d. A ball propelled on such a course.
e. In surfing, the lip of a breaking wave.
7. Baseball A curve ball.
8. Basketball A hook shot.
v. hooked, hook·ing, hooks
v.tr.
1.
a. To catch, suspend, or connect with a hook.
b. Informal To snare.
c. Slang To steal; snatch.
2. To fasten by a hook.
3. To pierce or gore with a hook.
4. Slang
a. To take strong hold of; captivate: a novel that hooked me on the very first page.
b. To cause to become addicted.
5. To make (a rug) by looping yarn through canvas with a type of hook.
6. Sports
a. To hit with a hook in boxing.
b. To hit (a golf ball) in a hook.
7. Baseball To pitch (a ball) with a curve.
8. Basketball To shoot (a ball) in a hook shot.
9. Sports To impede the progress of (an opponent in ice hockey) by holding or restraining the player with one's stick, in violation of the rules.
v.intr.
1. To bend like a hook.
2. To fasten by means of a hook or a hook and eye.
3. Slang To work as a prostitute.
Phrasal Verb:
hook up
1. To assemble or wire (a mechanism).
2. To connect a mechanism and a source of power.
3. Slang
a. To meet or associate: We agreed to hook up after class. He hooked up with the wrong crowd.
b. To become sexually involved with someone, especially casually.
c. To marry or get married.
Idioms:
by hook or by crook
By whatever means possible, fair or unfair.
get the hook Slang
To be unceremoniously dismissed or terminated.
hook, line, and sinker Informal
Without reservation; completely: swallowed the excuse hook, line, and sinker.
off the hook Informal
Freed, as from blame or a vexatious obligation: let me off the hook with a mild reprimand.
on (one's) own hook
By one's own efforts.

[Middle English hok, from Old English hōc; see keg- in Indo-European roots.]

by hook or by crook

By any means necessary; from the idea of using any tool that comes to hand.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.by hook or by crook - in any way necessary; "I'll pass this course by hook or by crook"
Translations
بأيَّة وسيلَه، مَهْما كَلَّف الأمْر
za každou cenu
auf Teufel komm rausso oder so
meî öllum tiltækum ráîum
ne yapıp edipşöyle ya da böyle

hook

(huk) noun
1. a small piece of metal shaped like a J fixed at the end of a fishing-line used for catching fish etc. a fish-hook.
2. a bent piece of metal etc used for hanging coats, cups etc on, or a smaller one sewn on to a garment, for fastening it. Hang your jacket on that hook behind the door; hooks and eyes.
3. in boxing, a kind of punch with the elbow bent. a left hook.
verb
1. to catch (a fish etc) with a hook. He hooked a large salmon.
2. to fasten or to be fastened by a hook or hooks. He hooked the ladder on (to the branch); This bit hooks on to that bit; Could you hook my dress up down the back?
3. in golf, to hit (the ball) far to the left of where it should be (or to the right if one is left-handed).
hooked adjective
1. curved like a hook. a hooked nose.
2. (with on) slang for very interested in, or showing a great liking for; addicted to. He's hooked on modern art; He's hooked on marijuana.
by hook or by crook
by some means or another; in any way possible. I'll get her to marry me, by hook or by crook.
off the hook
free from some difficulty or problem. If he couldn't keep the terms of the contract, he shouldn't have signed it – I don't see how we can get him off the hook now.
References in classic literature ?
It was not a manorial home in the ordinary sense, with fields, and pastures, and a grumbling farmer, out of whom the owner had to squeeze an income for himself and his family by hook or by crook.
the end of a rope that had been fresh cut; so I took leave to make another jerk, and, by hook or by crook, I got to the rope.
said Baisemeaux, and he poured out a great glass of wine and drank it off at a draught, trembling with joy at the idea of being, by hook or by crook, in the secret of some high archiepiscopal misdemeanor.