cabaret


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cab·a·ret

 (kăb′ə-rā′)
n.
1. A restaurant or nightclub providing short programs of live entertainment.
2. The floor show presented by such a restaurant or nightclub.

[French, tap-room, from Middle Dutch cabret, from Old North French camberette, from Late Latin camera, room; see chamber.]

cabaret

(ˈkæbəˌreɪ)
n
1. a floor show of dancing, singing, or other light entertainment at a nightclub or restaurant
2. chiefly US a nightclub or restaurant providing such entertainment
[C17: from Norman French: tavern, probably from Late Latin camera an arched roof, chamber]

cab•a•ret

(ˌkæb əˈreɪ)

n.
1. a restaurant providing food, drink, and often a floor show or other entertainment; nightclub or café.
2. the entertainment at a cabaret.
3. Archaic. a shop selling wines and liquors.
[1625–35; < French: tap-room, Middle French dial.]

cabaret

Musical entertainment offered in a nightclub or restaurant usually inolving singing and dancing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cabaret - a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drinkcabaret - a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club"
dive, honkytonk - a cheap disreputable nightclub or dance hall
spot - a business establishment for entertainment; "night spot"
supper club - usually a small luxurious nightclub
2.cabaret - a series of acts at a night club
show - the act of publicly exhibiting or entertaining; "a remarkable show of skill"
Translations
مَلْهى لَيْلي
kabaret
kabaret
kabaré
kabarett
kabaretas
kabarejs

cabaret

[ˈkæbəreɪ] Ncabaret m

cabaret

[ˈkæbəreɪ] n (= show) → spectacle m de cabaret

cabaret

nVarieté nt, → Varietee nt; (satirical) → Kabarett nt

cabaret

[ˈkæbəreɪ] ncabaret m inv

cabaret

(ˈkӕbərei) noun
an entertainment given in a restaurant etc. a singer in a cabaret.
References in classic literature ?
answered the abbe; "Edmond related to me everything until the moment when he was arrested in a small cabaret close to Marseilles.
The sign Notre Dame; it is an old cabaret, which I have transformed into a private house in two days.
At ten years' purchase, my dear Raoul; a superb affair, I bought the house for thirty thousand livres; it has a garden which opens to the Rue de la Mortillerie; the cabaret lets for a thousand livres, with the first story; the garret, or second floor, for five hundred livres.
Nevertheless, there were people of the Cabaret les Vantes, who said that they had seen her pass along the road to Paris, walking on the pebbles with her bare feet.
He told her about the Cabaret du Neant, the Abbaye, and the various haunts to which foreigners go.
It was quite the custom, after dinner, for many of the better classes of society, especially when entertaining curious Easterners, to spend an hour or several in motoring from dance-hall to dance-hall and cheap cabaret to cheap cabaret.
They fawned upon him for an invitation to sit at his table and buy beer for him in whatever garish cabaret Michael was performing.
It may be a cabaret in the Latin Quarter, a cafe in some obscure Italian village, a boozing ken in sailor-town, and it may be up at the club over Scotch and soda; but always it will be where John Barleycorn makes fellowship that I get immediately in touch, and meet, and know.
But no small cabaret for a straitened traveller being within sight, he had to seek one round the dark corner, where the cabbage leaves lay thickest, trodden about the public cistern at which women had not yet left off drawing water.
de Treville's, spread themselves about in the cabarets, in the public walks, and the public sports, shouting, twisting their mustaches, clanking their swords, and taking great pleasure in annoying the Guards of the cardinal whenever they could fall in with them; then drawing in the open streets, as if it were the best of all possible sports; sometimes killed, but sure in that case to be both wept and avenged; often killing others, but then certain of not rotting in prison, M.
The little cabarets and sutlers' shops along the bay resounded with the scraping of fiddles, with snatches of old French songs, with Indian whoops and yells, while every plumed and feathered vagabond had his troop of loving cousins and comrades at his heels.
We have so many beautiful and talented performers," said Shaun Kevlin, Regional Manager for Rick's Cabaret New York and Vivid Cabaret New York.