cactus

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cac·tus

 (kăk′təs)
n. pl. cac·ti (-tī′) or cac·tus·es
1. Any of numerous succulent, spiny, usually leafless plants of the family Cactaceae, native chiefly to arid regions of the Americas, having variously colored, often showy flowers with numerous stamens and petals.
2. Any of several similar plants.

[Latin, cardoon, from Greek kaktos.]

cactus

(ˈkæktəs)
n, pl -tuses or -ti (-taɪ)
1. (Plants) any spiny succulent plant of the family Cactaceae of the arid regions of America. Cactuses have swollen tough stems, leaves reduced to spines or scales, and often large brightly coloured flowers
2. (Plants) cactus dahlia a double-flowered variety of dahlia
[C17: from Latin: prickly plant, from Greek kaktos cardoon]
cactaceous adj

cac•tus

(ˈkæk təs)

n., pl. -ti (-tī), -tus•es, -tus.
any of numerous New World flowering plants of the family Cactaceae, of warm and arid regions, with succulent, leafless stems usu. bearing spines.
[1600–10; < Latin < Greek káktos cardoon]
cac′tus•like`, cac′toid, adj.

cac·tus

(kăk′təs)
Plural cacti (kăk′tī′) or cactuses
Any of various plants that have thick, leafless, often spiny stems and grow in hot, dry places, chiefly in North and South America. Photosynthesis takes place in the stems of cacti, as the leaves have evolved into narrow spines to prevent water loss. Some kinds of cacti have brightly colored flowers and edible fruit.
Did You Know? The 2,000 species of cacti are known for living in extremely dry climates, such as the American Southwest. Cacti are excellent at conserving water. Their leaves are sharp spines, which have been known to cause great pain to animals interested in eating them. The spines also help the plant gather scarce water. Water vapor in the air condenses on the spines and then drips to the ground, where it is taken up by the roots. The roots are shallow and widely spread out to take advantage of this condensation and the rare desert rain showers. A cactus can be between 80 and 90 percent water, and its thick walls keep its water from evaporating. In fact, a cactus can be a thousand times better at conserving water than a different kind of plant of the same weight.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cactus - any succulent plant of the family Cactaceae native chiefly to arid regions of the New World and usually having spinescactus - any succulent plant of the family Cactaceae native chiefly to arid regions of the New World and usually having spines
Cactaceae, cactus family, family Cactaceae - constituting the order Opuntiales
Acanthocereus pentagonus, Acanthocereus tetragonus, pitahaya, pitahaya cactus - cactus of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico having edible juicy fruit
Aporocactus flagelliformis, rat's-tail cactus, rattail cactus - commonly cultivated tropical American cactus having slender creeping stems and very large showy crimson flowers that bloom for several days
Ariocarpus fissuratus, living rock - usually unbranched usually spineless cactus covered with warty tubercles and having magenta flowers and white or green fruit; resembles the related mescal; northeastern Mexico and southwestern United States
Carnegiea gigantea, saguaro, sahuaro - extremely large treelike cactus of desert regions of southwestern United States having a thick columnar sparsely branched trunk bearing white flowers and edible red pulpy fruit
night-blooming cereus - any of several cacti of the genus Cereus
coryphantha - a cactus of the genus Coryphantha
echinocactus, barrel cactus - any cactus of the genus Echinocactus; strongly ribbed and very spiny; southwestern United States to Brazil
hedgehog cereus - cactus of the genus Echinocereus
rainbow cactus - a stout cylindrical cactus of the southwest United States and adjacent Mexico
epiphyllum, orchid cactus - any cactus of the genus Epiphyllum having flattened jointed irregularly branching stems and showy tubular flowers
barrel cactus - a cactus of the genus Ferocactus: unbranched barrel-shaped cactus having deep ribs with numerous spines and usually large funnel-shaped flowers followed by dry fruits
Easter cactus, Hatiora gaertneri, Schlumbergera gaertneri - spring-blooming South American cactus with oblong joints and coral-red flowers; sometimes placed in genus Schlumbergera
night-blooming cereus - any of several cacti of the genus Hylocereus
chichipe, Lemaireocereus chichipe - tall treelike Mexican cactus with edible red fruit
Lophophora williamsii, mescal, mezcal, peyote - a small spineless globe-shaped cactus; source of mescal buttons
mammillaria - any cactus of the genus Mammillaria
feather ball, Mammillaria plumosa - a low tuberculate cactus with white feathery spines; northeastern Mexico
garambulla, garambulla cactus, Myrtillocactus geometrizans - arborescent cactus of western Mexico bearing a small oblong edible berrylike fruit
Knowlton's cactus, Pediocactus knowltonii - small clustering cactus of southwestern United States; a threatened species
nopal - any of several cacti of the genus Nopalea resembling prickly pears
prickly pear, prickly pear cactus - cacti having spiny flat joints and oval fruit that is edible in some species; often used as food for stock
cholla, Opuntia cholla - arborescent cacti having very spiny cylindrical stem segments; southwestern United States and Mexico
mistletoe cactus - a plant of the genus Rhipsalis
Christmas cactus, Schlumbergera baridgesii, Schlumbergera buckleyi - epiphytic cactus of Brazilian ancestry widely cultivated as a houseplant having jointed flat segments and usually rose-purple flowers that bloom in winter
night-blooming cereus - any of several night-blooming cacti of the genus Selenicereus
crab cactus, Schlumbergera truncatus, Thanksgiving cactus, Zygocactus truncatus - South American jointed cactus with usually red flowers; often cultivated as a houseplant; sometimes classified as genus Schlumbergera
succulent - a plant adapted to arid conditions and characterized by fleshy water-storing tissues that act as water reservoirs
Translations
صَبَّارصبّـار ، صَبْر
kaktus
kaktus
kakto
صباره خنجری
kaktus
kaktus
kaktusz
kaktus
サボテン
선인장
kaktusas
kaktuss
kaktus
kaktus
kaktus
ตะบองเพชร
cây xương rồng

cactus

[ˈkæktəs] (cactuses, cacti (pl)) [ˈkæktaɪ] Ncacto m, cactus m inv

cactus

[ˈkæktəs] [cacti] [ˈkæktaɪ] (pl) ncactus m

cactus

nKaktus m

cactus

[ˈkæktəs] n (cactuses or cacti (pl)) [ˈkæktaɪ]cactus m inv

cactus

(ˈkӕktəs) plurals ˈcacti (-tӕi) ˈcactuses noun
a prickly plant whose stem stores water.

cactus

صَبَّار kaktus kaktus Kaktus κάκτος cactus kaktus cactus kaktus cactus サボテン 선인장 cactus kaktus kaktus cacto, cato кактус kaktus ตะบองเพชร kaktüs cây xương rồng 仙人掌

cactus

n (pl -ti) cactus m, cacto
References in classic literature ?
Few western wonders are more inspiring than the beauties of an Arizona moonlit landscape; the silvered mountains in the distance, the strange lights and shadows upon hog back and arroyo, and the grotesque details of the stiff, yet beautiful cacti form a picture at once enchanting and inspiring; as though one were catching for the first time a glimpse of some dead and forgotten world, so different is it from the aspect of any other spot upon our earth.
The Mediterranean, the blue sea par excellence, "the great sea" of the Hebrews, "the sea" of the Greeks, the "mare nostrum" of the Romans, bordered by orange-trees, aloes, cacti, and sea-pines; embalmed with the perfume of the myrtle, surrounded by rude mountains, saturated with pure and transparent air, but incessantly worked by underground fires; a perfect battlefield in which Neptune and Pluto still dispute the empire of the world!
There was not a blade of grass to be seen in the paths, or a weed in the flower-beds; no fine lady ever trained and watered her geraniums, her cacti, and her rhododendrons, with more pains than this hitherto unseen gardener bestowed upon his little enclosure.
Yonder," said Purun Bhagat, breasting the lower slopes of the Sewaliks, where the cacti stand up like seven-branched candlesticks-"yonder I shall sit down and get knowledge"; and the cool wind of the Himalayas whistled about his ears as he trod the road that led to Simla.
They were larger, the colors more brilliant and the shapes startling, some almost to grotesqueness, though even such added to the charm and romance of the landscape as the giant cacti render weirdly beautiful the waste spots of the sad Mohave.
A few hedges, made of cacti and agave, mark out where some wheat or Indian corn has been planted.
If we don't reduce the demand for wild plants, especially cacti, from the Chihuahuan Desert, we run the risk of jeopardizing populations and losing species," says TRAFFIC botanist Christopher Robbins.
The cacti I found at "Texas Hollywood," as the film set is now called for the benefit of tourists, were a strange grouping of agaves and other succulents, many prickly pear cacti, plus a number of cereus cacti, which are native to much of Central and South America.
WARREN WITHERS first became interested in cacti and succulents during an eight-month stay in hospital recovering from tuberculosis and losing a kidney.
The black market cacti can fetch as much as $100 per foot with extra bonuses for each" "arm," says Ted Cordery, the endangered species coordinator for the Bureau of Land Management in Arizona.
Cacti are succulents, plants with fleshy stems and/or leaves containing large amounts of water.
com), the leader in commercial open source systems and network management software, announced today that it will be hosting the 3rd annual Cacti developers meeting at its headquarters in San Francisco during this year's LinuxWorld show, Aug.