cadence


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Related to cadence: Cadence Design Systems

ca·dence

 (kād′ns)
n. pl. ca·denc·es
1. Balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory.
2. The measure or beat of movement, as in dancing or marching.
3.
a. A falling inflection of the voice, as at the end of a sentence.
b. General inflection or modulation of the voice.
4. Music A progression of chords moving to a harmonic close, point of rest, or sense of resolution.

[Middle English, from Old French *cadence, from Old Italian cadenza, from Vulgar Latin *cadentia, a falling, from Latin cadēns, cadent-, present participle of cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

ca′denced adj.

cadence

(ˈkeɪdəns) or

cadency

n, pl -dences or -dencies
1. the beat or measure of something rhythmic
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) a fall in the pitch of the voice, as at the end of a sentence
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) modulation of the voice; intonation
4. (Poetry) a rhythm or rhythmic construction in verse or prose; measure
5. (Music, other) the close of a musical phrase or section
[C14: from Old French, from Old Italian cadenza, literally: a falling, from Latin cadere to fall]

ca•dence

(ˈkeɪd ns)

n., v. -denced, -denc•ing. n.
1. rhythmic flow of sounds or words.
2. the beat, rate, or measure of any rhythmic movement.
3. the flow or rhythm of events.
4. a slight falling in pitch of the voice in speaking.
5. a sequence of musical chords moving toward a harmonic point of rest or closing.
v.t.
6. to make rhythmical.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Italian cadenza]
ca•den•tial (kəˈdɛn ʃəl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cadence - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of versecadence - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
catalexis - the absence of a syllable in the last foot of a line or verse
scansion - analysis of verse into metrical patterns
common meter, common measure - the usual (iambic) meter of a ballad
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
2.cadence - the close of a musical section
musical passage, passage - a short section of a musical composition
amen cadence, plagal cadence - a cadence (frequently ending church music) in which the chord of the subdominant precedes the chord of the tonic
3.cadence - a recurrent rhythmical series
rhythmicity - the rhythmic property imparted by the accents and relative durations of notes in a piece of music

cadence

noun
1. intonation, accent, inflection, modulation He recognised the Polish cadences in her voice.
2. rhythm, beat, measure (Prosody), metre, pulse, throb, tempo, swing, lilt There was a sudden shift in the cadence of the music.

cadence

noun
The patterned, recurring alternation of contrasting elements, such as stressed and unstressed notes in music:
Translations

cadence

[ˈkeɪdəns] N (Mus) [of voice] → cadencia f; (= rhythm) → ritmo m, cadencia f
the cadences of proseel ritmo de la prosa

cadence

[ˈkeɪdəns] n
(= intonation) [voice] → intonation f
(MUSIC)cadence f

cadence

n (Mus) → Kadenz f; (of voice)Tonfall m, → Melodie f; (= rhythm)Rhythmus m, → Melodie f; the cadences of his proseder Duktus seiner Prosa

cadence

[ˈkeɪdns] ncadenza
References in classic literature ?
The child went singing away, following up the current of the brook, and striving to mingle a more lightsome cadence with its melancholy voice.
Perhaps they were; or perhaps there might have been shoals of them in the far horizon; but lulled into such an opium-like listlessness of vacant, unconscious reverie is this absent-minded youth by the blending cadence of waves with thoughts, that at last he loses his identity; takes the mystic ocean at his feet for the visible image of that deep, blue, bottomless soul, pervading mankind and nature; and every strange, half-seen, gliding, beautiful thing that eludes him; every dimly-discovered, uprising fin of some undiscernible form, seems to him the embodiment of those elusive thoughts that only people the soul by continually flitting through it.
These words, sung by voices of a peculiar and melancholy sweetness, in an air which seemed like the sighing of earthy despair after heavenly hope, floated through the dark prison rooms with a pathetic cadence, as verse after verse was breathed out:
Sometimes, preoccupied with her work, she sang the refrain very low, very lingeringly; "A long time ago" came out like the saddest cadence of a funeral hymn.
Yet, no one could have looked at him twice, without looking again: even though the opportunity of observation had not extended to the mournful cadence of his low grave voice, and to the abstraction that overclouded him fitfully, without any apparent reason.
Father," she said, in a tone of gentle gravity, which sometimes came like a sadder, slower cadence across her playfulness, "we shall take the furze bush into the garden; it'll come into the corner, and just against it I'll put snowdrops and crocuses, 'cause Aaron says they won't die out, but'll always get more and more.
He scarce had finisht, when such murmur filld Th' Assembly, as when hollow Rocks retain The sound of blustring winds, which all night long Had rous'd the Sea, now with hoarse cadence lull Sea-faring men orewatcht, whose Bark by chance Or Pinnace anchors in a craggy Bay After the Tempest: Such applause was heard As MAMMON ended, and his Sentence pleas'd, Advising peace: for such another Field They dreaded worse then Hell: so much the fear Of Thunder and the Sword of MICHAEL Wrought still within them; and no less desire To found this nether Empire, which might rise By pollicy, and long process of time, In emulation opposite to Heav'n.
At length one of them called out in a clear, polite, smooth dialect, not unlike in sound to the Italian: and therefore I returned an answer in that language, hoping at least that the cadence might be more agreeable to his ears.
The mere cadence of the sentences, the subtle monotony of their music, so full as it was of complex refrains and movements elaborately repeated, produced in the mind of the lad, as he passed from chapter to chapter, a form of reverie, a malady of dreaming, that made him unconscious of the falling day and creeping shadows.
Akut was the first to interpret the strange cadence.
Immediately a prelude of pipe, cithern, and viol, touched with practised minstrelsy, began to play from a neighboring thicket, in such a mirthful cadence that the boughs of the Maypole quivered to the sound.
in a melancholy cadence, and over and over and over again.