cadence

(redirected from cadences)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to cadences: plagal cadence

ca·dence

 (kād′ns)
n. pl. ca·denc·es
1. Balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory.
2. The measure or beat of movement, as in dancing or marching.
3.
a. A falling inflection of the voice, as at the end of a sentence.
b. General inflection or modulation of the voice.
4. Music A progression of chords moving to a harmonic close, point of rest, or sense of resolution.

[Middle English, from Old French *cadence, from Old Italian cadenza, from Vulgar Latin *cadentia, a falling, from Latin cadēns, cadent-, present participle of cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

ca′denced adj.

cadence

(ˈkeɪdəns) or

cadency

n, pl -dences or -dencies
1. the beat or measure of something rhythmic
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) a fall in the pitch of the voice, as at the end of a sentence
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) modulation of the voice; intonation
4. (Poetry) a rhythm or rhythmic construction in verse or prose; measure
5. (Music, other) the close of a musical phrase or section
[C14: from Old French, from Old Italian cadenza, literally: a falling, from Latin cadere to fall]

ca•dence

(ˈkeɪd ns)

n., v. -denced, -denc•ing. n.
1. rhythmic flow of sounds or words.
2. the beat, rate, or measure of any rhythmic movement.
3. the flow or rhythm of events.
4. a slight falling in pitch of the voice in speaking.
5. a sequence of musical chords moving toward a harmonic point of rest or closing.
v.t.
6. to make rhythmical.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Italian cadenza]
ca•den•tial (kəˈdɛn ʃəl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cadence - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of versecadence - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
catalexis - the absence of a syllable in the last foot of a line or verse
scansion - analysis of verse into metrical patterns
common meter, common measure - the usual (iambic) meter of a ballad
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
2.cadence - the close of a musical section
musical passage, passage - a short section of a musical composition
amen cadence, plagal cadence - a cadence (frequently ending church music) in which the chord of the subdominant precedes the chord of the tonic
3.cadence - a recurrent rhythmical series
rhythmicity - the rhythmic property imparted by the accents and relative durations of notes in a piece of music

cadence

noun
1. intonation, accent, inflection, modulation He recognised the Polish cadences in her voice.
2. rhythm, beat, measure (Prosody), metre, pulse, throb, tempo, swing, lilt There was a sudden shift in the cadence of the music.

cadence

noun
The patterned, recurring alternation of contrasting elements, such as stressed and unstressed notes in music:
Translations

cadence

[ˈkeɪdəns] N (Mus) [of voice] → cadencia f; (= rhythm) → ritmo m, cadencia f
the cadences of proseel ritmo de la prosa

cadence

[ˈkeɪdəns] n
(= intonation) [voice] → intonation f
(MUSIC)cadence f

cadence

n (Mus) → Kadenz f; (of voice)Tonfall m, → Melodie f; (= rhythm)Rhythmus m, → Melodie f; the cadences of his proseder Duktus seiner Prosa

cadence

[ˈkeɪdns] ncadenza
References in classic literature ?
And his cadences were their cadences, the cadences which voiced their woe and what to them was the meaning of the stiffness, and the cold, and dark.
The books he liked were queer; sometimes I would find him poring over the poems of Mallarme, and he read them as a child reads, forming the words with his lips, and I wondered what strange emotion he got from those subtle cadences and obscure phrases; and again I found him absorbed in the detective novels of Gaboriau.
At one or two favourite cadences, he threw in a little assistance of his own, where the knight's voice seemed unable to carry the air so high as his worshipful taste approved.
He takes, indeed, the old themes, and manages them better than their old masters, with more delicate cadences, more delicate transitions of thought, through long dwelling on earlier practice.