caesalpinoid

caesalpinoid

(sɛzˈælpɪnˌɔɪd) or

caesalpiniaceous

adj
(Botany) of, relating to, or belonging to the Caesalpinoideae, a mainly tropical subfamily of leguminous plants that have irregular flowers: includes carob, senna, brazil, cassia, and poinciana
[from New Latin Caesalpinia type genus, named after Andrea Cesalpino (1519–1603), Italian botanist]
References in periodicals archive ?
Different species grow on mobile dunes, such as the caesalpinoid Cassia [= Chamaecrista] chamaecristoides, or grasses like Trachypogon gouini, or species of the genus Schizachyrium, all of which tolerate different levels of sand accumulation.
Other abundant plants include creosote bushes (Larrea, Zygophyllaceae), mimosoid legumes such as mesquites (Prosopis), acacias (Acacia), caesalpinoid legumes such as Jerusalem thorn (Parkinsonia), palo verde (Cercidium), Fabaceae such as chanar (Geoffroea), desert ironwood (Olneya), tarbrush, (Flourensia, Aster-aceae), and frankenias (Frankenia, Frankeniaceae).
The vegetation consists of espinares (spiny forests of small-leaved mimosoid and caesalpinoid members of the Leguminosae that shed their leaves during the six months or more when there are no rains) and cardonales (thickets of columnar or candelabra-form cacti to 26 ft [8 m] tall) accompanied by some trees from the espinares and a low layer of smaller cacti.
In tropical biomes, the trees--especially mimosoid legumes such as Acacia, Albizia, and Prosopis and caesalpinoid legumes such as Cassia--play a major role in the recycling of the biogeochemical elements.
In the wettest climates of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo and of Cameroon, the trees of Caesalpinoid legumes are abundant and sometimes dominant.
Most caesalpinoids and mimosoids present wet stigma (see Fig.
Buzz-pollinated caesalpinoids, such as Cassia grandis (present study) and other members of the subtribe Cassiinae, tribe Cassieae (Dulberger et al.