cajoler


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ca·jole

 (kə-jōl′)
v. ca·joled, ca·jol·ing, ca·joles
v.tr.
1. To persuade by flattery, gentle pleading, or insincere language: "He knew how she cajoled him into getting things for her and then would not even let him kiss her" (Theodore Dreiser).
2. To elicit or obtain by flattery, gentle pleading, or insincere language: The athlete cajoled a signing bonus out of the team's owner.
v.intr.
To use flattery, pleading, or insincere language in an attempt to persuade someone to do something: "She complained and he cajoled, bribing her with dollar bills for landing ten [figure skating] jumps in a row" (Joan Ryan).

[French cajoler, possibly blend of Old French cageoler, to chatter like a jay (from geai, jai, jay; see jay2) and Old French gaioler, to lure into a cage (from gaiole, jaiole, cage; see jail).]

ca·jol′er n.
ca·jol′er·y (-jō′lə-rē) n.
ca·jol′ing·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Producer Lovullo saw his role as a combination psychologist, scheduler, talent scout, gofer, cajoler, financial officer and troubleshooter.
The brilliant business lobbyist who served as Jimmy Carter's assistant for public liaison (chief cajoler of interest groups), is now eyeing a cabinetlevel post, most likely Commerce or Transportation, according to friends and associates.