cajolery


Also found in: Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

ca·jole

 (kə-jōl′)
v. ca·joled, ca·jol·ing, ca·joles
v.tr.
1. To persuade by flattery, gentle pleading, or insincere language: "He knew how she cajoled him into getting things for her and then would not even let him kiss her" (Theodore Dreiser).
2. To elicit or obtain by flattery, gentle pleading, or insincere language: The athlete cajoled a signing bonus out of the team's owner.
v.intr.
To use flattery, pleading, or insincere language in an attempt to persuade someone to do something: "She complained and he cajoled, bribing her with dollar bills for landing ten [figure skating] jumps in a row" (Joan Ryan).

[French cajoler, possibly blend of Old French cageoler, to chatter like a jay (from geai, jai, jay; see jay2) and Old French gaioler, to lure into a cage (from gaiole, jaiole, cage; see jail).]

ca·jol′er n.
ca·jol′er·y (-jō′lə-rē) n.
ca·jol′ing·ly adv.

Cajolery

 of taverners—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cajolery - flattery intended to persuade
flattery - excessive or insincere praise
Translations

cajolery

[kəˈdʒəʊlərɪ] Nzalamerias fpl

cajolery

nUberredung f, → Beschwatzen nt (inf)

cajolery

[kəˈdʒəʊlərɪ] n (see vb) → opera di convincimento, lusinghe fpl
References in classic literature ?
And they enslaved you over again - but not frankly, as the true, noble men would do with weight of their own right arms, but secretly, by spidery machinations and by wheedling and cajolery and lies.
Dunstan felt as if there must be a little frightening added to the cajolery, for his own arithmetical convictions were not clear enough to afford him any forcible demonstration as to the advantages of interest; and as for security, he regarded it vaguely as a means of cheating a man by making him believe that he would be paid.
It came to him curiously that it was his destiny ever to stand on this high place, looking down on unending hordes of black trouble that required control, bullying, and cajolery.