calembour

calembour

(ˌkæləmˈbʊə; French kalɑ̃bur)
n
a pun
[C19: from French]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Martin Amis and I have always called him S--t Arthur Goat Mama, if we may be permitted such a calembour in these dark, PC times.
Leherisse et Cullembourg, Me Hareng; ils cachent souvent un calembour : l'Hirondelle conduite par Hiver; Boulanger habite la Huchette ; Hippolyte soigne les chevaux ; ils ont un sens ironique : Lieuvain, Lheureux ; de l'aveu meme de son createur, Homais est a rapprocher de Homo (l'homme).
His Calembour line was the first well-known one in this country and still is a dominant bloodline in French Brittany circles.
Comme nous le savons, Proust est excellent pasticheur, il l'est de Balzac, des Goncourt, de Saint-Simon; son pastiche antisemite est fait a travers le calembour sodomisme-sionisme.
Il titolo consta di un calembour costituito da tre termini: "Dream", "Image" e "Age", lessemi che costituiscono anche precisi leitmotiv di tutta la successiva opera soldiniana.
Al di la della riuscita dei singoli testi, le macerie del gia visto e gia letto sembrano presupporre la coscienza di un'originale un tempo forse intatto e ora necessariamente frantumato: in breve, anche il riconoscimento di una tradizione da fare a pezzi o fare evaporare in calembour.
L'horreur qu'il inspirait aux chretiens provoqua un calembour facile: on decomposa le mot en bufo horridus," 35.
D'ailleurs, la musique et les vers, e'est deux chansons qui cherchent vainement a s'accorder, meme dans les cas ties rares ou cela s'accorde, ga fait l'effet d'un mauvais calembour.
Consequently, since a sub-title allows authors room to add some explanation of what their work is about, some of them have felt empowered to use puns (some better than others), Wortspiele and calembours in the main titles of their works, knowing that they can rely on the sub-title to give the reader some idea of what these works are really about.
In the introduction to Alien Cantica Alberto Granese, quoting Luigi Fontanella, writes that Rimanelli's poems have "stressed the author's particular 'centrifugal lexicon,' with 'a gratified, sarcastic and freewheeling use of many rhetorical devices, with a predominance of antiphrasis, alliteration, calembours, metonymy, epanalepsis, hyperbaton; thus running over a wide expressive gamut, from the plebeian to the sublime, from specialized technical terms to classical literary language, obtaining, at times, a pastiche of burgeoning intensity.