calendar


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cal·en·dar

 (kăl′ən-dər)
n.
1. Any of various systems of reckoning time in which the beginning, length, and divisions of a year are defined, sometimes along with multiyear cycles.
2. A table showing the months, weeks, and days in at least one specific year.
3. A schedule of events.
4. An ordered list of matters to be considered: the bills on a legislative calendar.
5. Chiefly British A catalog of a university.
tr.v. cal·en·dared, cal·en·dar·ing, cal·en·dars
To enter in a calendar; schedule.

[Middle English calender, from Old French calendier, from Late Latin kalendārium, from Latin, account book, from kalendae, calends (from the fact that monthly interest was due on the calends); see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

THREE PRINCIPAL CALENDARS

The Gregorian calendar is now in use as the civil calendar throughout most of the world. The Jewish calendar is the official calendar of the Jewish religious community. The Islamic calendar is the official calendar in many Muslim countries. Each calendar listed below begins with the first month of the year and includes the number of days each month contains. Many months have a variable number of days, as described below.

GREGORIANJEWISHISLAMIC
The Gregorian calendar, introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, is a corrected form of the Julian calendar. It is based on a solar year of 365 days. Every fourth year is a leap year of 366 days except for centenary years not evenly divisible by 400.The Jewish year consists of twelve months defined by lunar cycles, with some years having a thirteenth month so that seasonal festivals stay aligned with the solar year. For religious purposes Nisan is the first month, but the New Year is celebrated in Tishri.The Islamic calendar is based on the lunar year and contains 354 or 355 days. The number of days in each month varies with the lunar cycle. The beginning of the year retrogresses through the solar year, completing a full cycle every 32.5 years.
MonthsNumber of DaysMonthsNumber of DaysMonthsNumber of Days
January 31Nisan (Mar-Apr)30Muharram 29 or 30
February 28 or 29Iyar (Apr-May)29Safar 29 or 30
March 31Sivan (May-Jun)30Rabi I 29 or 30
April 30Tammuz (Jun-Jul)29Rabi II 29 or 30
May 31Av (Jul-Aug)30Jumada I 29 or 30
June 30Elul (Aug-Sep)29Jumada II 29 or 30
July 31Tishri (Sep-Oct)30Rajab 29 or 30
August 31Heshvan (Oct-Nov)29 or 30Shaʔban 29 or 30
September 30Kislev (Nov-Dec)29 or 30Ramadan 29 or 30
October 31Tevet (Dec-Jan)29Shawwal 29 or 30
November 30Shevat (Jan-Feb)30Dhu'l-Qa'dah 29 or 30
December31Adar (Feb-Mar)29 or 30Dhu'l-Hijjah 29 or 30
Adar Sheni (leap year only)29

Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

calendar

(ˈkælɪndə)
n
1. a system for determining the beginning, length, and order of years and their divisions. See also Gregorian calendar, Jewish calendar, Julian calendar, Revolutionary calendar, Roman calendar
2. a table showing any such arrangement, esp as applied to one or more successive years
3. a list, register, or schedule of social events, pending court cases, appointments, etc
vb
(tr) to enter in a calendar; schedule; register
[C13: via Norman French from Medieval Latin kalendārium account book, from Kalendae the calends, when interest on debts became due]
calendrical, caˈlendric adj

cal•en•dar

(ˈkæl ən dər)

n.
1. a table or register with the days of each month and week in a year.
2. any of various systems of reckoning time, esp. with reference to the beginning, length, and divisions of the year, as the Gregorian calendar or the Julian calendar.
3. a list or register, esp. one arranged chronologically, as of appointments, cases to be tried in court, or bills to be considered by a legislature.
4. Obs. a guide or example.
v.t.
5. to enter in a calendar; register.
[1175–1225; Middle English calender < Anglo-French < Latin calendārium account book, derivative of Calend(ae) calends (when debts were due)]
ca•len•dri•cal (kəˈlɛn drɪ kəl) ca•len′dric, adj.

Calendar

See also almanacs; time

a flgure-of-eight-shaped scale, for showing the declination of the sun and the equation of time for every day of the year. — analemmatic, adj.
the twenty-ninth day of February, added to the calendar every four years, except in centenary years evenly divisible by 400, to compensate for the discrepancy between the arbitrary 365-day calendar year and the actual time of the solar year. — bissextile, adj.
Rare. a person who makes calendars.
1. an intercalation of a day or days in the calendar to correct error.
2. the day or days intercalated. — embolic, embolismic, embolismical, adj.
the study of the origin, growth, meaning, and history of Christian religious feasts. — heortological, adj.
in the Roman Empire, the cyclical, fifteen-year fiscal period, used for dating ordinary events. Also called cycle of indiction.indictional. adj.
inserted into the calendar, as the twenty-ninth day of February in a leap year. — intercalation, n.intercalative, adj.
the period of the moon’s synodic revolution, from the time of the new moon to the next new moon; one lunar month or approximately 29 1/2 days.
a period of five years.
1. a list or calendar of months.
2. Eastern Orthodoxy. a calendar of all festivals for martyrs and saints, with brief accounts of their lives. Also Menologion.
2. a church calendar, listing festivals for saints.
the practice of eliminating the bissextile day every 134 years to adjust the date of the new moon. Cf. proemptosis.
1. the time of the new moon or the beginning of the month.
2. a heathen festival at the time of the new moon.
the adding of a day every 300 and again every 2400 years to adjust the date of the new moon. Cf. metemptosis.

Calendar

 an orderly list of persons, things, or events; a list of offenders in the Newgate Calendar or in similar prisons or at Quarter Session Courts; a list or record.
Examples: calendar of academics; of crimes, 1856; of documents; of my past endeavours, 1601; of martyrs, 1781; of saints, 1631; of sins, 1633.

calendar


Past participle: calendared
Gerund: calendaring

Imperative
calendar
calendar
Present
I calendar
you calendar
he/she/it calendars
we calendar
you calendar
they calendar
Preterite
I calendared
you calendared
he/she/it calendared
we calendared
you calendared
they calendared
Present Continuous
I am calendaring
you are calendaring
he/she/it is calendaring
we are calendaring
you are calendaring
they are calendaring
Present Perfect
I have calendared
you have calendared
he/she/it has calendared
we have calendared
you have calendared
they have calendared
Past Continuous
I was calendaring
you were calendaring
he/she/it was calendaring
we were calendaring
you were calendaring
they were calendaring
Past Perfect
I had calendared
you had calendared
he/she/it had calendared
we had calendared
you had calendared
they had calendared
Future
I will calendar
you will calendar
he/she/it will calendar
we will calendar
you will calendar
they will calendar
Future Perfect
I will have calendared
you will have calendared
he/she/it will have calendared
we will have calendared
you will have calendared
they will have calendared
Future Continuous
I will be calendaring
you will be calendaring
he/she/it will be calendaring
we will be calendaring
you will be calendaring
they will be calendaring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been calendaring
you have been calendaring
he/she/it has been calendaring
we have been calendaring
you have been calendaring
they have been calendaring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been calendaring
you will have been calendaring
he/she/it will have been calendaring
we will have been calendaring
you will have been calendaring
they will have been calendaring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been calendaring
you had been calendaring
he/she/it had been calendaring
we had been calendaring
you had been calendaring
they had been calendaring
Conditional
I would calendar
you would calendar
he/she/it would calendar
we would calendar
you would calendar
they would calendar
Past Conditional
I would have calendared
you would have calendared
he/she/it would have calendared
we would have calendared
you would have calendared
they would have calendared
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calendar - a system of timekeeping that defines the beginning and length and divisions of the yearcalendar - a system of timekeeping that defines the beginning and length and divisions of the year
organization, arrangement, organisation, system - an organized structure for arranging or classifying; "he changed the arrangement of the topics"; "the facts were familiar but it was in the organization of them that he was original"; "he tried to understand their system of classification"
embolism, intercalation - an insertion into a calendar
lunar calendar - a calendar based on lunar cycles
lunisolar calendar - a calendar based on both lunar and solar cycles
solar calendar - a calendar based on solar cycles
2.calendar - a list or register of events (appointments or social events or court cases etc); "I have you on my calendar for next Monday"
list, listing - a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)
docket - (law) the calendar of a court; the list of cases to be tried or a summary of the court's activities
3.calendar - a tabular array of the days (usually for one year)
table, tabular array - a set of data arranged in rows and columns; "see table 1"
perpetual calendar - a chart or mechanical device that indicates the days of the week corresponding to any given date over a long period of years
Verb1.calendar - enter into a calendar
schedule - plan for an activity or event; "I've scheduled a concert next week"

calendar

noun
An organized list, as of procedures, activities, or events:
Translations
تَقْوِيـمتَقْويم ، روزنامهقائِمَه، جَدْوَل
kalendářrozpis
kalender
kalenteritoimintakalenteriaikataulu
kalendar
naptárelõjegyzések
dagatallisti, skrátímataltímatal, dagatal
カレンダー
달력
kalendoriustvarkaraštiskalendorinis planas
kalendārais plānskalendārs
koledarrokovnik
kalendarкалендар
kalenderagenda
ปฏิทิน
takvimfaaliyet programı
lịch

calendar

[ˈkæləndəʳ]
A. N
1. (= chart) → calendario m
2. (= year) → calendario m
the Church calendarel calendario eclesiástico
the university calendar (Brit) → el calendario universitario
the most important event in the sporting calendarel acontecimiento más importante del año or calendario deportivo
3. (Jur) → lista f (de pleitos)
B. CPD calendar month Nmes m civil
calendar year Naño m civil

calendar

[ˈkælɪndər] n
(= chart) → calendrier m
(= programme of events) → programme mcalendar month nmois m (de calendrier)calendar year nannée f civile

calendar

n
Kalender m
(= schedule)Terminkalender m; (Jur) → Prozessregister nt; calendar of eventsVeranstaltungskalender m

calendar

[ˈkælɪndəʳ] ncalendario
the Church calendar → il calendario ecclesiastico

calendar

(ˈkӕləndə) noun
1. a table showing the months and days of the year. Look at the calendar and tell me which day of the week November 22nd is.
2. a list of important dates or events. The football team's calendar is complete now.

calendar ends in -ar (not -er).

calendar

تَقْوِيـم kalendář kalender Kalender ημερολόγιο calendario kalenteri calendrier kalendar calendario カレンダー 달력 kalender kalender kalendarz calendário календарь kalender ปฏิทิน takvim lịch 日历

calendar

n. calendario, almanaque.
References in classic literature ?
The Mayas had a peculiar civilization of their own, thousands of years ago, and their calendar system was so involved "
For blacks, the year's calendar should show naught but three hundred and sixty-five Fourth of Julys and New Year's Days.
The room is about thirty feet square, with whitewashed walls, bare save for a calendar.
This was, indeed, a bad failure, for this animal would now be dubbed a martyr, and would take his place among the saints of the Roman calendar.
I made no notes, and have forgotten the details, but the construction of the floral calendar was very entertaining while it lasted.
She had not been able, however, to borrow her parents' virtues and those of other generous ancestors and escape all the weaknesses in the calendar.
THE morning of her husband's return to North Shingles was a morning memorable forever in the domestic calendar of Mrs.
And it was he, without doubt, who scratched a calendar on this stone.
But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round -- apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that -- as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time: the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys.
She kept a calendar of the holidays in this way, and every morning checked a day off in exactly the same manner.
When he fell asleep of an evening, with his knotted hands clenching the sides of the easy-chair, and his bald head tattooed with deep wrinkles falling forward on his breast, I would sit and look at him, wondering what he had done, and loading him with all the crimes in the Calendar, until the impulse was powerful on me to start up and fly from him.
The inhabitants of Raveloe were not severely regular in their church-going, and perhaps there was hardly a person in the parish who would not have held that to go to church every Sunday in the calendar would have shown a greedy desire to stand well with Heaven, and get an undue advantage over their neighbours-- a wish to be better than the "common run", that would have implied a reflection on those who had had godfathers and godmothers as well as themselves, and had an equal right to the burying-service.