caliver


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caliver

(ˈkælɪvə)
n
a light musket introduced in the early 16th century
[C16: variant of calibre]
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall length was 54 inches, and its 10-pound weight was closer to a caliver than a musket.
Recoil with the matchlock caliver was light, due to the gun's weight and the distribution of shock provided by the generous fishtail butt.
Robert Golding desirous to understand what might be done at Shamakie, which is a daies journey from Backow, went thither, from whence returning, he was set on by theeves, and was shot into the knee with an arrow, who had verie hardly escaped with his life and goodes, but that by good hap he killed one of the theeves horses with his caliver, and shot a Turke thorow both cheeks with a dag.
This matchlock would best be termed a caliver or light musket.
Through the Office of Education in the Department of the Interior, the government sponsored programs like Freedom's People, a 1941-1942 series created by Ambrose Caliver, a black employee in the Office of Education.
Ambrose Caliver, Postwar Education of Negroes: Educational Implications of Army Data and Experiences of Negro Veterans and War Workers (Washington, D.
50 caliver Hawken produced an average of 1-1/4 to 1-1/2-inch groups, benched at 50 yards.
For example, in 1606 William Walton of Cannington brought suit in the court of Star Chamber accusing John Parham of Poyntington and his son, Sir Edward Parham of Milborne Port, with procuring 300 'Rioutous and Routous' men--their friends, tenants, popish recusants, and Papists--armed with muskets, calivers, pikes, long staffs with blades, and armour in Milborne Port, where they marched and skirmished in 'tumultious and warlicke order' with trumpets, drums, and ensigns, to the house of John Parham two miles distant in Poyntington, and skirmished again.