calling


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Related to calling: calling card

call·ing

 (kô′lĭng)
n.
1. An inner urge or a strong impulse, especially one believed to be divinely inspired.
2. An occupation, profession, or career.

calling

(ˈkɔːlɪŋ)
n
1. a strong inner urge to follow an occupation, etc; vocation
2. an occupation, profession, or trade

call•ing

(ˈkɔ lɪŋ)

n.
1. a vocation, profession, or trade.
2. a divine call or summons: a calling to the priesthood.
3. a strong impulse or inclination: an inner calling.
[1200–50]

Calling

 a group of persons following a profession, specifically, the church, medicine, or nursing.
Example: calling house of wits, 1860.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calling - the particular occupation for which you are trainedcalling - the particular occupation for which you are trained
job, line of work, occupation, business, line - the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money; "he's not in my line of business"
specialism, specialization, specialty, speciality, specialisation - the special line of work you have adopted as your career; "his specialization is gastroenterology"
lifework - the principal work of your career
walk of life, walk - careers in general; "it happens in all walks of life"
business life, professional life - a career in industrial or commercial or professional activities

calling

noun profession, work, business, line, trade, career, mission, employment, province, occupation, pursuit, vocation, walk of life, life's work, métier He was a serious man, dedicated to his calling as a physician.

calling

noun
1. An inner urge to pursue an activity or perform a service:
2. Activity pursued as a livelihood:
Slang: racket.
Archaic: employ.
Translations
مِهْنَه، حِرفَه
povolání
kald
köllun; starf

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ]
A. N (= vocation) → vocación f, profesión f
B. CPD calling card N (esp US) → tarjeta f de visita comercial

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ] n
[priest] → vocation f
(= trade, occupation) → métier mcalling card ncarte f de visite

calling

nBerufung f

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ] nvocazione f

call

(koːl) verb
1. to give a name to. My name is Alexander but I'm called Sandy by my friends
2. to regard (something) as. I saw you turn that card over – I call that cheating.
3. to speak loudly (to someone) to attract attention etc. Call everyone over here; She called louder so as to get his attention.
4. to summon; to ask (someone) to come (by letter, telephone etc). They called him for an interview for the job; He called a doctor.
5. to make a visit. I shall call at your house this evening; You were out when I called.
6. to telephone. I'll call you at 6 p.m.
7. (in card games) to bid.
noun
1. an exclamation or shout. a call for help.
2. the song of a bird. the call of a blackbird.
3. a (usually short) visit. The teacher made a call on the boy's parents.
4. the act of calling on the telephone. I've just had a call from the police.
5. (usually with the) attraction. the call of the sea.
6. a demand. There's less call for coachmen nowadays.
7. a need or reason. You've no call to say such things!
ˈcaller noun
ˈcalling noun
a trade or profession. Teaching is a worthwhile calling.
ˈcall-box noun
a public telephone box.
call for
1. to demand or require. This calls for quick action.
2. to collect. I'll call for you at eight o'clock.
call off
to cancel. The party's been called off.
call on
1. to visit. I'll call on him tomorrow.
2. to ask someone to speak at a meeting etc.
3. to ask someone publicly to something. We call on both sides to stop the fighting.
call up
to telephone (someone). He called me up from the airport.
give (someone) a call
to telephone (someone). I'll give you a call tomorrow.
on call
keeping (oneself) ready to come out to an emergency. Which of the doctors is on call tonight?
References in classic literature ?
They adopted Jo's plan of dividing the long seams into four parts, and calling the quarters Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, and in that way got on capitally, especially when they talked about the different countries as they stitched their way through them.
Calling Adolph Myers into the school yard he began to beat him with his fists.
Professor Bumper seemed to fall backward as the grip of the serpent relaxed, but Tom, dropping his rifle, and calling to Ned to keep an eye on the snake, leaped forward and caught his friend.
While we were disputing `about the ring, I heard a mournful voice calling, `Antonia, Antonia
Edna took him in her arms, and seating herself in the rocker, began to coddle and caress him, calling him all manner of tender names, soothing him to sleep.
The loyal servants of the British crown had given to one of these forest-fastnesses the name of William Henry, and to the other that of Fort Edward, calling each after a favorite prince of the reigning family.
And Isaacs & Sons were delighted at the great man's pleasantry, and afterward repeated it many times, calling upon each other to bear witness, and Spear felt as though some one had given him a new backbone, and Andrews, who was guiding Thorndike out of the building, was thinking to himself what a great confidence man had been lost when Thorndike became a banker.
I suppose they'll be calling US by our Christian names next.
Her scowl,--as the world, or such part of it as sometimes caught a transitory glimpse of her at the window, wickedly persisted in calling it,--her scowl had done Miss Hepzibah a very ill office, in establishing her character as an ill-tempered old maid; nor does it appear improbable that, by often gazing at herself in a dim looking-glass, and perpetually encountering her own frown with its ghostly sphere, she had been led to interpret the expression almost as unjustly as the world did.
Before the barn door strutted the gallant cock, that pattern of a husband, a warrior and a fine gentleman, clapping his burnished wings and crowing in the pride and gladness of his heart, --sometimes tearing up the earth with his feet, and then generously calling his ever-hungry family of wives and children to enjoy the rich morsel which he had discovered.