calling

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call·ing

 (kô′lĭng)
n.
1. An inner urge or a strong impulse, especially one believed to be divinely inspired.
2. An occupation, profession, or career.

calling

(ˈkɔːlɪŋ)
n
1. a strong inner urge to follow an occupation, etc; vocation
2. an occupation, profession, or trade

call•ing

(ˈkɔ lɪŋ)

n.
1. a vocation, profession, or trade.
2. a divine call or summons: a calling to the priesthood.
3. a strong impulse or inclination: an inner calling.
[1200–50]

Calling

 a group of persons following a profession, specifically, the church, medicine, or nursing.
Example: calling house of wits, 1860.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calling - the particular occupation for which you are trainedcalling - the particular occupation for which you are trained
job, line of work, occupation, business, line - the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money; "he's not in my line of business"
specialism, specialization, specialty, speciality, specialisation - the special line of work you have adopted as your career; "his specialization is gastroenterology"
lifework - the principal work of your career
walk of life, walk - careers in general; "it happens in all walks of life"
business life, professional life - a career in industrial or commercial or professional activities

calling

noun profession, work, business, line, trade, career, mission, employment, province, occupation, pursuit, vocation, walk of life, life's work, métier He was a serious man, dedicated to his calling as a physician.

calling

noun
1. An inner urge to pursue an activity or perform a service:
2. Activity pursued as a livelihood:
Slang: racket.
Archaic: employ.
Translations
مِهْنَه، حِرفَه
povolání
kald
köllun; starf

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ]
A. N (= vocation) → vocación f, profesión f
B. CPD calling card N (esp US) → tarjeta f de visita comercial

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ] n
[priest] → vocation f
(= trade, occupation) → métier mcalling card ncarte f de visite

calling

nBerufung f

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ] nvocazione f

call

(koːl) verb
1. to give a name to. My name is Alexander but I'm called Sandy by my friends
2. to regard (something) as. I saw you turn that card over – I call that cheating.
3. to speak loudly (to someone) to attract attention etc. Call everyone over here; She called louder so as to get his attention.
4. to summon; to ask (someone) to come (by letter, telephone etc). They called him for an interview for the job; He called a doctor.
5. to make a visit. I shall call at your house this evening; You were out when I called.
6. to telephone. I'll call you at 6 p.m.
7. (in card games) to bid.
noun
1. an exclamation or shout. a call for help.
2. the song of a bird. the call of a blackbird.
3. a (usually short) visit. The teacher made a call on the boy's parents.
4. the act of calling on the telephone. I've just had a call from the police.
5. (usually with the) attraction. the call of the sea.
6. a demand. There's less call for coachmen nowadays.
7. a need or reason. You've no call to say such things!
ˈcaller noun
ˈcalling noun
a trade or profession. Teaching is a worthwhile calling.
ˈcall-box noun
a public telephone box.
call for
1. to demand or require. This calls for quick action.
2. to collect. I'll call for you at eight o'clock.
call off
to cancel. The party's been called off.
call on
1. to visit. I'll call on him tomorrow.
2. to ask someone to speak at a meeting etc.
3. to ask someone publicly to something. We call on both sides to stop the fighting.
call up
to telephone (someone). He called me up from the airport.
give (someone) a call
to telephone (someone). I'll give you a call tomorrow.
on call
keeping (oneself) ready to come out to an emergency. Which of the doctors is on call tonight?
References in classic literature ?
The Doctor occupied two floors of a large stiff house, where several callings purported to be pursued by day, but whereof little was audible any day, and which was shunned by all of them at night.
I could not help laughing again, at his balancing all callings and professions so equally; and I told him so.
Whether common ones as to callings and earnings," pursued Joe, reflectively, "mightn't be the better of continuing for a keep company with common ones, instead of going out to play with oncommon ones - which reminds me to hope that there were a flag, perhaps?
At the same time he should encourage his citizens to practise their callings peaceably, both in commerce and agriculture, and in every other following, so that the one should not be deterred from improving his possessions for fear lest they be taken away from him or another from opening up trade for fear of taxes; but the prince ought to offer rewards to whoever wishes to do these things and designs in any way to honour his city or state.
There are deferential people in a dozen callings whom my Lady Dedlock suspects of nothing but prostration before her, who can tell you how to manage her as if she were a baby, who do nothing but nurse her all their lives, who, humbly affecting to follow with profound subservience, lead her and her whole troop after them; who, in hooking one, hook all and bear them off as Lemuel Gulliver bore away the stately fleet of the majestic Lilliput.
Doubtless; but I fear that my young relative Will Ladislaw is chiefly determined in his aversion to these callings by a dislike to steady application, and to that kind of acquirement which is needful instrumentally, but is not charming or immediately inviting to self-indulgent taste.
He came to me at once to make sure of this, and remained to walk the floor gloriously as he told me what recognition means to gentlemen of the artistic callings.
Fortunate indeed are those in which there is combined a little good and a little bad, a little knowledge of many things outside their own callings, a capacity for love and a capacity for hate, for such as these can look with tolerance upon all, unbiased by the egotism of him whose head is so heavy on one side that all his brains run to that point.
It was furnished with the cast-off possessions of his bachelor days and with odd things which he sheltered for friends of his who followed itinerant and more or less artistic callings.
The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling are so suited to their different educations, humours, and callings, that each of them would be improper in any other mouth.
He was not quite so certain of the callings and stations of two smart young ladies who were in conversation with the fat lady before the fire, until--having sat himself down in a corner, and remarked that he would wait until the other customers had been served--the fat lady resumed the dialogue which his entrance had interrupted.
Now will the city have to fill and swell with a multitude of callings which are not required by any natural want; such as the whole tribe of hunters and actors, of whom one large class have to do with forms and colours; another will be the votaries of music--poets and their attendant train of rhapsodists, players, dancers, contractors; also makers of divers kinds of articles, including women's dresses.