calling

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call·ing

 (kô′lĭng)
n.
1. An inner urge or a strong impulse, especially one believed to be divinely inspired.
2. An occupation, profession, or career.

calling

(ˈkɔːlɪŋ)
n
1. a strong inner urge to follow an occupation, etc; vocation
2. an occupation, profession, or trade

call•ing

(ˈkɔ lɪŋ)

n.
1. a vocation, profession, or trade.
2. a divine call or summons: a calling to the priesthood.
3. a strong impulse or inclination: an inner calling.
[1200–50]

Calling

 a group of persons following a profession, specifically, the church, medicine, or nursing.
Example: calling house of wits, 1860.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calling - the particular occupation for which you are trainedcalling - the particular occupation for which you are trained
job, line of work, occupation, business, line - the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money; "he's not in my line of business"
specialism, specialization, specialty, speciality, specialisation - the special line of work you have adopted as your career; "his specialization is gastroenterology"
lifework - the principal work of your career
walk of life, walk - careers in general; "it happens in all walks of life"
business life, professional life - a career in industrial or commercial or professional activities

calling

noun profession, work, business, line, trade, career, mission, employment, province, occupation, pursuit, vocation, walk of life, life's work, métier He was a serious man, dedicated to his calling as a physician.

calling

noun
1. An inner urge to pursue an activity or perform a service:
2. Activity pursued as a livelihood:
Slang: racket.
Archaic: employ.
Translations
مِهْنَه، حِرفَه
povolání
kald
köllun; starf

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ]
A. N (= vocation) → vocación f, profesión f
B. CPD calling card N (esp US) → tarjeta f de visita comercial

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ] n
[priest] → vocation f
(= trade, occupation) → métier mcalling card ncarte f de visite

calling

nBerufung f

calling

[ˈkɔːlɪŋ] nvocazione f

call

(koːl) verb
1. to give a name to. My name is Alexander but I'm called Sandy by my friends
2. to regard (something) as. I saw you turn that card over – I call that cheating.
3. to speak loudly (to someone) to attract attention etc. Call everyone over here; She called louder so as to get his attention.
4. to summon; to ask (someone) to come (by letter, telephone etc). They called him for an interview for the job; He called a doctor.
5. to make a visit. I shall call at your house this evening; You were out when I called.
6. to telephone. I'll call you at 6 p.m.
7. (in card games) to bid.
noun
1. an exclamation or shout. a call for help.
2. the song of a bird. the call of a blackbird.
3. a (usually short) visit. The teacher made a call on the boy's parents.
4. the act of calling on the telephone. I've just had a call from the police.
5. (usually with the) attraction. the call of the sea.
6. a demand. There's less call for coachmen nowadays.
7. a need or reason. You've no call to say such things!
ˈcaller noun
ˈcalling noun
a trade or profession. Teaching is a worthwhile calling.
ˈcall-box noun
a public telephone box.
call for
1. to demand or require. This calls for quick action.
2. to collect. I'll call for you at eight o'clock.
call off
to cancel. The party's been called off.
call on
1. to visit. I'll call on him tomorrow.
2. to ask someone to speak at a meeting etc.
3. to ask someone publicly to something. We call on both sides to stop the fighting.
call up
to telephone (someone). He called me up from the airport.
give (someone) a call
to telephone (someone). I'll give you a call tomorrow.
on call
keeping (oneself) ready to come out to an emergency. Which of the doctors is on call tonight?
References in classic literature ?
Now those things in which a city should be one are of different sorts, and in preserving an alternate reciprocation of power between these, the safety thereof consists (as I have already mentioned in my treatise on Morals), for amongst freemen and equals this is absolutely necessary; for all cannot govern at the same time, but either by the year, or according to some other regulation or time, by which means every one in his turn will be in office; as if the shoemakers and carpenters should exchange occupations, and not always be employed in the same calling.
I dreamed that I heard a voice calling me from away down in Uncle Stephen's Walk--
I preferred the disadvantage which I must be at in his eyes, and in the eyes of most of my fellow-citizens; I believe I had the applause of the organ-builder, who thought the law no calling for me.
With a slight inclination of her head she passed, hearing behind her Stepan Arkadyevitch's loud voice calling him to come up, and the quiet, soft, and composed voice of Vronsky refusing.
Four days were spent in thinking what name to give him, because (as he said to himself) it was not right that a horse belonging to a knight so famous, and one with such merits of his own, should be without some distinctive name, and he strove to adapt it so as to indicate what he had been before belonging to a knight-errant, and what he then was; for it was only reasonable that, his master taking a new character, he should take a new name, and that it should be a distinguished and full-sounding one, befitting the new order and calling he was about to follow.