callosity


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cal·los·i·ty

 (kə-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. cal·los·i·ties
1. The condition of being calloused. Also called tylosis.
2. Hardheartedness; insensitivity.
3. See callus.

[Middle English callosite, from Old French, from Late Latin callōsitās, from Latin callōsus, callous; see callous.]

callosity

(kəˈlɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. hardheartedness
2. (Botany) another name for callus1

cal•los•i•ty

(kəˈlɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a callous condition.
2. a hardened or thickened part of a plant.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.callosity - an area of skin that is thick or hard from continual pressure or friction (as the sole of the foot)
hardening - abnormal hardening or thickening of tissue
clavus, corn - a hard thickening of the skin (especially on the top or sides of the toes) caused by the pressure of ill-fitting shoes
2.callosity - devoid of passion or feeling; hardheartedness
insensitiveness, insensitivity - the inability to respond to affective changes in your interpersonal environment
dullness - lack of sensibility; "there was a dullness in his heart"; "without him the dullness of her life crept into her work no matter how she tried to compartmentalize it."
Translations

callosity

[kæˈlɒsɪtɪ] Ncallo m, callosidad f

cal·los·i·ty

n. callosidad tejido endurecido de la epidermis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, high concentrations of auxin may lead to an excessive proliferation of cells, intense callosity, and consequent inhibition of roots and shoot growth.
Anterolateral callosity transverse, projecting forward, with seta bearing pore on upper lateral face; anterior margin of callosity strongly curved (Fig.
The exclusion criterion were: a) deformity with other congenital conditions, b) doubtful infections at the callosity.
The huge variation in the frequency of callosity between herds using similar milking systems suggests that a major genetic influence to susceptibility should not be overlooked (Shearn & Hillerton, 1996).