callous


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cal·lous

 (kăl′əs)
adj.
1. Having calluses; toughened: callous skin on the elbow.
2. Emotionally hardened; unfeeling: a callous indifference to the suffering of others.
tr. & intr.v. cal·loused, cal·lous·ing, cal·lous·es
To make or become callous.

[Middle English, from Old French cailleux, from Latin callōsus, from callum, hard skin.]

cal′lous·ly adv.
cal′lous·ness n.
Usage Note: Do not confuse the adjective callous, as in Years of dealing with criminals had left her callous, with the noun callus, as in I have a callus on my thumb. Also, do not confuse the verb callous, which means "to make or become callous," with the verb callus "to form or develop hardened tissue."

callous

(ˈkæləs)
adj
1. unfeeling; insensitive
2. (Pathology) (of skin) hardened and thickened
vb
(Pathology) pathol to make or become callous
[C16: from Latin callōsus; see callus]
ˈcallously adv
ˈcallousness n

cal•lous

(ˈkæl əs)

adj.
1. made hard; hardened.
2. insensitive; indifferent; unsympathetic.
3. having a callus; indurated, as parts of the skin exposed to friction.
v.t., v.i.
4. to make or become hard or callous.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin callōsus hard-skinned, tough]
cal′lous•ly, adv.
cal′lous•ness, n.

callous


Past participle: calloused
Gerund: callousing

Imperative
callous
callous
Present
I callous
you callous
he/she/it callouses
we callous
you callous
they callous
Preterite
I calloused
you calloused
he/she/it calloused
we calloused
you calloused
they calloused
Present Continuous
I am callousing
you are callousing
he/she/it is callousing
we are callousing
you are callousing
they are callousing
Present Perfect
I have calloused
you have calloused
he/she/it has calloused
we have calloused
you have calloused
they have calloused
Past Continuous
I was callousing
you were callousing
he/she/it was callousing
we were callousing
you were callousing
they were callousing
Past Perfect
I had calloused
you had calloused
he/she/it had calloused
we had calloused
you had calloused
they had calloused
Future
I will callous
you will callous
he/she/it will callous
we will callous
you will callous
they will callous
Future Perfect
I will have calloused
you will have calloused
he/she/it will have calloused
we will have calloused
you will have calloused
they will have calloused
Future Continuous
I will be callousing
you will be callousing
he/she/it will be callousing
we will be callousing
you will be callousing
they will be callousing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been callousing
you have been callousing
he/she/it has been callousing
we have been callousing
you have been callousing
they have been callousing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been callousing
you will have been callousing
he/she/it will have been callousing
we will have been callousing
you will have been callousing
they will have been callousing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been callousing
you had been callousing
he/she/it had been callousing
we had been callousing
you had been callousing
they had been callousing
Conditional
I would callous
you would callous
he/she/it would callous
we would callous
you would callous
they would callous
Past Conditional
I would have calloused
you would have calloused
he/she/it would have calloused
we would have calloused
you would have calloused
they would have calloused
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.callous - make insensitive or callous; deaden feelings or morals
inure, indurate, harden - cause to accept or become hardened to; habituate; "He was inured to the cold"
Adj.1.callous - emotionally hardened; "a callous indifference to suffering"; "cold-blooded and indurate to public opinion"
insensitive - deficient in human sensibility; not mentally or morally sensitive; "insensitive to the needs of the patients"
2.callous - having calluses; having skin made tough and thick through wear; "calloused skin"; "with a workman's callous hands"
toughened, tough - physically toughened; "the tough bottoms of his feet"

callous

callous

adjective
Translations
قاسي القلب، غَليظ
bezcitnýnecitlivý
følelseskoldhårdhudethjerteløs
keményszívűkérges
tilfinningalaus, harîgeîja; fólskulegur
žiauriai
bezjūtīgscietsir-dīgs
duygusuzvurdumduymaz

callous

[ˈkæləs]
A. ADJ
1. [person, remark] → insensible, cruel; [treatment, murder, crime, attack] → despiadado, cruel
his callous disregard for their safetysu cruel indiferencia ante su seguridad
2. (Med) → calloso
B. N (Med) → callo m

callous

[ˈkæləs] adj [person] → dur(e), insensible; [disregard, indifference] → total(e); [treatment] → dur(e)

callous

adj
(= cruel)gefühllos, herzlos
(Med) → schwielig, kallös

callous

[ˈkæləs] adj (person) → insensibile; (remark) → crudele

callous

(ˈkӕləs) adjective
unfeeling; cruel. a callous person/attack.
ˈcallously adverb
ˈcallousness noun
References in classic literature ?
He who ever bestoweth is in danger of losing his shame; to him who ever dispenseth, the hand and heart become callous by very dispensing.
Callous as they were to my suffering, they were equally callous to their own when anything befell them.
But perhaps this is very fanciful; and it may be that she was merely bored with her husband and went to Strickland out of a callous curiosity.
In the corporal's changed face, in the sound of his voice, in the stirring and deafening noise of the drums, he recognized that mysterious, callous force which compelled people against their will to kill their fellow men- that force the effect of which he had witnessed during the executions.
In a battlefield," he observed slowly, "one naturally becomes a little callous, but here it is different.
The hearts of many throb at the very breathings of wealth through a flute, who would remain callous to the bitterest sighs of poverty.
But, indeed, from what I saw, all these buccaneers were as callous as the sea they sailed on.
Much of his past was unearthed, indeed, and all disreputable: tales came out of the man's cruelty, at once so callous and violent; of his vile life, of his strange associates, of the hatred that seemed to have surrounded his career; but of his present whereabouts, not a whisper.
Meanwhile, the callous hands of Pierrat Torterue's assistants had bared that charming leg, that tiny foot, which had so often amazed the passers-by with their delicacy and beauty, in the squares of Paris.
What was extraordinary was that everyone not only liked him, but even people previously unsympathetic, cold, and callous, were enthusiastic over him, gave way to him in everything, treated his feeling with tenderness and delicacy, and shared his conviction that he was the happiest man in the world because his betrothed was beyond perfection.
The whole object of the training to which the negro is put, from the time he is sold in the northern market till he arrives south, is systematically directed towards making him callous, unthinking, and brutal.
He may be weak, but he is not callous, not coldly selfish.