callous


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cal·lous

 (kăl′əs)
adj.
1. Having calluses; toughened: callous skin on the elbow.
2. Emotionally hardened; unfeeling: a callous indifference to the suffering of others.
tr. & intr.v. cal·loused, cal·lous·ing, cal·lous·es
To make or become callous.

[Middle English, from Old French cailleux, from Latin callōsus, from callum, hard skin.]

cal′lous·ly adv.
cal′lous·ness n.
Usage Note: Do not confuse the adjective callous, as in Years of dealing with criminals had left her callous, with the noun callus, as in I have a callus on my thumb. Also, do not confuse the verb callous, which means "to make or become callous," with the verb callus "to form or develop hardened tissue."

callous

(ˈkæləs)
adj
1. unfeeling; insensitive
2. (Pathology) (of skin) hardened and thickened
vb
(Pathology) pathol to make or become callous
[C16: from Latin callōsus; see callus]
ˈcallously adv
ˈcallousness n

cal•lous

(ˈkæl əs)

adj.
1. made hard; hardened.
2. insensitive; indifferent; unsympathetic.
3. having a callus; indurated, as parts of the skin exposed to friction.
v.t., v.i.
4. to make or become hard or callous.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin callōsus hard-skinned, tough]
cal′lous•ly, adv.
cal′lous•ness, n.

callous


Past participle: calloused
Gerund: callousing

Imperative
callous
callous
Present
I callous
you callous
he/she/it callouses
we callous
you callous
they callous
Preterite
I calloused
you calloused
he/she/it calloused
we calloused
you calloused
they calloused
Present Continuous
I am callousing
you are callousing
he/she/it is callousing
we are callousing
you are callousing
they are callousing
Present Perfect
I have calloused
you have calloused
he/she/it has calloused
we have calloused
you have calloused
they have calloused
Past Continuous
I was callousing
you were callousing
he/she/it was callousing
we were callousing
you were callousing
they were callousing
Past Perfect
I had calloused
you had calloused
he/she/it had calloused
we had calloused
you had calloused
they had calloused
Future
I will callous
you will callous
he/she/it will callous
we will callous
you will callous
they will callous
Future Perfect
I will have calloused
you will have calloused
he/she/it will have calloused
we will have calloused
you will have calloused
they will have calloused
Future Continuous
I will be callousing
you will be callousing
he/she/it will be callousing
we will be callousing
you will be callousing
they will be callousing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been callousing
you have been callousing
he/she/it has been callousing
we have been callousing
you have been callousing
they have been callousing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been callousing
you will have been callousing
he/she/it will have been callousing
we will have been callousing
you will have been callousing
they will have been callousing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been callousing
you had been callousing
he/she/it had been callousing
we had been callousing
you had been callousing
they had been callousing
Conditional
I would callous
you would callous
he/she/it would callous
we would callous
you would callous
they would callous
Past Conditional
I would have calloused
you would have calloused
he/she/it would have calloused
we would have calloused
you would have calloused
they would have calloused
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.callous - make insensitive or callous; deaden feelings or morals
inure, indurate, harden - cause to accept or become hardened to; habituate; "He was inured to the cold"
Adj.1.callous - emotionally hardened; "a callous indifference to suffering"; "cold-blooded and indurate to public opinion"
insensitive - deficient in human sensibility; not mentally or morally sensitive; "insensitive to the needs of the patients"
2.callous - having calluses; having skin made tough and thick through wear; "calloused skin"; "with a workman's callous hands"
toughened, tough - physically toughened; "the tough bottoms of his feet"

callous

callous

adjective
Translations
قاسي القلب، غَليظ
bezcitnýnecitlivý
følelseskoldhårdhudethjerteløs
keményszívűkérges
tilfinningalaus, harîgeîja; fólskulegur
žiauriai
bezjūtīgscietsir-dīgs
duygusuzvurdumduymaz

callous

[ˈkæləs]
A. ADJ
1. [person, remark] → insensible, cruel; [treatment, murder, crime, attack] → despiadado, cruel
his callous disregard for their safetysu cruel indiferencia ante su seguridad
2. (Med) → calloso
B. N (Med) → callo m

callous

[ˈkæləs] adj [person] → dur(e), insensible; [disregard, indifference] → total(e); [treatment] → dur(e)

callous

adj
(= cruel)gefühllos, herzlos
(Med) → schwielig, kallös

callous

[ˈkæləs] adj (person) → insensibile; (remark) → crudele

callous

(ˈkӕləs) adjective
unfeeling; cruel. a callous person/attack.
ˈcallously adverb
ˈcallousness noun
References in classic literature ?
In many cases, it is a gradual hardening process on both sides,--the owner growing more and more cruel, as the servant more and more callous.
The callous palms of the laborer are conversant with finer tissues of self-respect and heroism, whose touch thrills the heart, than the languid fingers of idleness.
Think what overwrought reverence that shows for the turnip, and what callous disrespect for the girl.
Pity, Jane, from some people is a noxious and insulting sort of tribute, which one is justified in hurling back in the teeth of those who offer it; but that is the sort of pity native to callous, selfish hearts; it is a hybrid, egotistical pain at hearing of woes, crossed with ignorant contempt for those who have endured them.
And couldn't Uncle Pumblechook, being always considerate and thoughtful for us - though you may not think it, Joseph," in a tone of the deepest reproach, as if he were the most callous of nephews, "then mention this boy, standing Prancing here" - which I solemnly declare I was not doing - "that I have for ever been a willing slave to?
This was rather a coarse mode of estimating Silas's relation to Eppie; but we must remember that many of the impressions which Godfrey was likely to gather concerning the labouring people around him would favour the idea that deep affections can hardly go along with callous palms and scant means; and he had not had the opportunity, even if he had had the power, of entering intimately into all that was exceptional in the weaver's experience.
But, indeed, from what I saw, all these buccaneers were as callous as the sea they sailed on.
It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his "natural superiors," and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous "cash payment.
Much of his past was unearthed, indeed, and all disreputable: tales came out of the man's cruelty, at once so callous and violent; of his vile life, of his strange associates, of the hatred that seemed to have surrounded his career; but of his present whereabouts, not a whisper.
With a careless motion, she flung to the ground, callous as a devil, the child that up to now she had clutched strenuously to her breast, growling over it as a dog growls over a bone.
His heart would soon be rendered callous, for, as he ran about begging, people would pass him by and give him nothing.
Pleasure may turn a heart to stone, riches may make it callous, but sorrow - oh, sorrow cannot break it.