calorically


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ca·lor·ic

 (kə-lôr′ĭk, -lŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to heat: the caloric effect of sunlight.
2. Of or relating to calories: the caloric content of foods.
n.
A hypothetically indestructible, uncreatable, highly elastic, self-repellent, all-pervading fluid formerly thought responsible for the production, possession, and transfer of heat.

[French calorique, from Latin calor, heat; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ca·lor′i·cal·ly adv.

calorically

(kəˈlɒrɪkəlɪ)
adv
in a caloric manner
References in periodicals archive ?
If you want to try treats again, reduce his regular meal size by a quarter and use that food or a calorically equal bunch of treats.
49) Such environmental factors include "unlimited access to highly palatable and very calorically dense foods" and a sedentary lifestyle because of the prevalence of labor-saving devices.
Kamal Husseni said that "after a fasted state, the stomach cannot tolerate calorically dense foods, so lighter meals are a much healthier alternative.
calorically dense food lacking nutrition) and physical inactivity.
The calorically restricted low-fat nutrient-dense diet in Biosphere 2 significantly lowers blood glucose, total leukocyte count, cholesterol, and blood pressure in humans.
59) This matches recommendations published in the US Department of Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 against eating large calorically dense meals.
Some are calorically equal to sucrose, others have fewer calories and some are noncaloric.
From the participants of a research conducted by the International Journal of Obesity, those who had protein packed breakfast ate 26 percent fewer calories at lunch than those who ate a calorically identical meal with less protein.
For example, nutritionally balanced food lists, with calorically equivalent alternatives, in 100 kcal portions or equivalent portions of foods within the same MyPyramide food group [34].
For example, the type or amount of food is likely to be better calorically in captivity than in the wild (Alasalvar et al.