calumniate

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Related to calumniations: slanderer

ca·lum·ni·ate

 (kə-lŭm′nē-āt′)
tr.v. ca·lum·ni·at·ed, ca·lum·ni·at·ing, ca·lum·ni·ates
To make maliciously or knowingly false statements about. See Synonyms at malign.

[Latin calumniārī, calumniāt-, from calumnia, calumny; see calumny.]

ca·lum′ni·a′tion n.
ca·lum′ni·a′tor n.

calumniate

(kəˈlʌmnɪˌeɪt)
vb
(tr) to slander
caˈlumniable adj
caˌlumniˈation n
caˈlumniˌator n

ca•lum•ni•ate

(kəˈlʌm niˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
to make false and malicious statements about; slander.
[1545–55; < Latin calumniātus]
ca•lum`ni•a′tion, n.
ca•lum′ni•a`tor, n.

calumniate


Past participle: calumniated
Gerund: calumniating

Imperative
calumniate
calumniate
Present
I calumniate
you calumniate
he/she/it calumniates
we calumniate
you calumniate
they calumniate
Preterite
I calumniated
you calumniated
he/she/it calumniated
we calumniated
you calumniated
they calumniated
Present Continuous
I am calumniating
you are calumniating
he/she/it is calumniating
we are calumniating
you are calumniating
they are calumniating
Present Perfect
I have calumniated
you have calumniated
he/she/it has calumniated
we have calumniated
you have calumniated
they have calumniated
Past Continuous
I was calumniating
you were calumniating
he/she/it was calumniating
we were calumniating
you were calumniating
they were calumniating
Past Perfect
I had calumniated
you had calumniated
he/she/it had calumniated
we had calumniated
you had calumniated
they had calumniated
Future
I will calumniate
you will calumniate
he/she/it will calumniate
we will calumniate
you will calumniate
they will calumniate
Future Perfect
I will have calumniated
you will have calumniated
he/she/it will have calumniated
we will have calumniated
you will have calumniated
they will have calumniated
Future Continuous
I will be calumniating
you will be calumniating
he/she/it will be calumniating
we will be calumniating
you will be calumniating
they will be calumniating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been calumniating
you have been calumniating
he/she/it has been calumniating
we have been calumniating
you have been calumniating
they have been calumniating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been calumniating
you will have been calumniating
he/she/it will have been calumniating
we will have been calumniating
you will have been calumniating
they will have been calumniating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been calumniating
you had been calumniating
he/she/it had been calumniating
we had been calumniating
you had been calumniating
they had been calumniating
Conditional
I would calumniate
you would calumniate
he/she/it would calumniate
we would calumniate
you would calumniate
they would calumniate
Past Conditional
I would have calumniated
you would have calumniated
he/she/it would have calumniated
we would have calumniated
you would have calumniated
they would have calumniated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.calumniate - charge falsely or with malicious intent; attack the good name and reputation of someone; "The journalists have defamed me!" "The article in the paper sullied my reputation"
accuse, charge - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
assassinate - destroy or damage seriously, as of someone's reputation; "He assassinated his enemy's character"
libel - print slanderous statements against; "The newspaper was accused of libeling him"
badmouth, drag through the mud, malign, traduce - speak unfavorably about; "She badmouths her husband everywhere"

calumniate

verb
To make defamatory statements about:
Law: libel.
Translations

calumniate

[kəˈlʌmnɪeɪt] VT (frm) → calumniar

calumniate

vt (liter)schmähen (geh), → verunglimpfen
References in periodicals archive ?
He painted such charges as slanders and calumniations of the sort true Christians had always faced, now more specifically intended by Elizabeth's councillors to pressure the queen to tighten measures against Catholics, to incense her against the Spanish, and more generally, to make her more pliable to do their bidding through fear.
43) Iago's skill in getting rid of Cassio before Othello awakes, and his subsequent friendly demeanor toward Cassio later in this scene, remind one of a passage in Plutarch: "a flatterer will do what he can to chase away true friends, and not suffer them to approach near; or if he be not able to do so, then openly and in public place he will seem to curry favour with them, to honour and admire them, as far better than himself; but secretly, underhand, and behind their backs, he will not let to raise some privy calumniations, and sow slanderous reports tending to their discredit" (78).
Yet Secker's Autobiography, locked away by him in Lambeth Palace Library with restrictions that it be seen only with permission of the regnant archbishop, was designed, according to Barnard, to defend Secker against calumniations contained in a work by Francis Blackburne entitled The Confessional.